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Old 18th January 2010, 15:52   #31
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adzegeek,

None of these are new trails made specifically for offroading. There isn't so much money in the sport that can build new trails for us. These are estate/plantation trails, some are current, some are old abandoned ones. In fact, offroaders prefer abandoned trails since they are more challenging than regularly used trails.

Cutting trees and growing trees is everyday part of any plantation life. I have lived around farm houses and coffee estates while growing up. It is funny sometimes to see city folks getting alarmed at trees being cut, they don't notice it is also being grown. It is all part of managing a plantation.

Now, I wouldn't say offroading is totally in harmony with nature. No human activity generally is in harmony with nature. Sometimes people do runover young plants and destroy them. However, this activity does bring city folks and their families closer to nature and develop a love towards them. Offroading gives you more insight into nature than watching it on Nat Geo or Discovery channel. Yeah, the channels may give you more trivia, but it can't tell you how it feels to stand on the top of a mountain or in the middle of jungle where no normal vehicle would reach.
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Old 18th January 2010, 16:13   #32
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Now, I wouldn't say offroading is totally in harmony with nature. No human activity generally is in harmony with nature. Sometimes people do runover young plants and destroy them. However, this activity does bring city folks and their families closer to nature and develop a love towards them. Offroading gives you more insight into nature than watching it on Nat Geo or Discovery channel. Yeah, the channels may give you more trivia, but it can't tell you how it feels to stand on the top of a mountain or in the middle of jungle where no normal vehicle would reach.
couldnt agree more. I can see that in some of your earlier threads, you were reaching somewhere - mountain top/peak etc. If I look at the off road guides abroad, that seems to be the idea.

But this one - see more like the journey itself having the thrill - rather than reaching anywhere. I do understand the camping and the camaraderie part of it at the jungle base.

regarding the city folks - nature linkage - your point is well taken - but I have seen this work other way around as well esp when people are not sensitized enough - In Abu dhabi, saw some locals run over two desert snakes (I would like to believe in panic, but didnt seem like that) during Gulf Times annual fun drive. Saw some guys reverse into rare plant life in Wadi Bih (another offroader trail close to Dubai). and wash off oil leaks in pristine pure waters near Mussandam. Idiots will be idiots, however ignorance can be handled to some extent by good guidance upfront.
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Old 18th January 2010, 22:56   #33
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Superb writeup as usual samurai. Thanks for sharing the experience. I so badly wanted to come to this event, but could not. Let me see if I can get some more pics of your jeep from the local Kakkabe boys. I think lots of them took pictures on their cams and mobiles.
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Old 19th January 2010, 12:17   #34
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Superb writeup as usual samurai. Thanks for sharing the experience. I so badly wanted to come to this event, but could not. Let me see if I can get some more pics of your jeep from the local Kakkabe boys. I think lots of them took pictures on their cams and mobiles.
Thanks Nidhi, let's hope they find something. This trail will be really formidable in the monsoon. You can join up then.
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Old 22nd January 2010, 12:32   #35
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Superb writeup as usual samurai. Thanks for sharing the experience. I so badly wanted to come to this event, but could not. Let me see if I can get some more pics of your jeep from the local Kakkabe boys. I think lots of them took pictures on their cams and mobiles.
hmmn i second that, very rarely you get a jeep freak like samurai to have such high writing abilities

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adzegeek,

None of these are new trails made specifically for offroading. There isn't so much money in the sport that can build new trails for us. These are estate/plantation trails, some are current, some are old abandoned ones. In fact, offroaders prefer abandoned trails since they are more challenging than regularly used trails.

Cutting trees and growing trees is everyday part of any plantation life. I have lived around farm houses and coffee estates while growing up. It is funny sometimes to see city folks getting alarmed at trees being cut, they don't notice it is also being grown. It is all part of managing a plantation.

Now, I wouldn't say offroading is totally in harmony with nature. No human activity generally is in harmony with nature. Sometimes people do runover young plants and destroy them. However, this activity does bring city folks and their families closer to nature and develop a love towards them. Offroading gives you more insight into nature than watching it on Nat Geo or Discovery channel. Yeah, the channels may give you more trivia, but it can't tell you how it feels to stand on the top of a mountain or in the middle of jungle where no normal vehicle would reach.
i do again agree with you, actually my love for offroading, helped develop a keen interest in nature for my kids and wife. we are all now proffesional bird watchers in Goa. heheh

Last edited by Jaggu : 22nd January 2010 at 12:58. Reason: Back to back posts, please use Multi Quote instead, Thanks
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Old 10th February 2010, 12:48   #36
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@Samurai as always what an awesome writeup

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Old 13th March 2010, 02:47   #37
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Samurai San, you explain offroading so well that I rarely give a miss to your write ups. I would say that if you were my maths teacher, way back in school, I would have scored a 100 out of 100.

The best part is that all technical part is explained from the point of view of amateur. I think a expert is guy who never gives up learning. Thanx for sharing your offroading experiences. It is a good learning experience for newbies like me. Sometimes I read some of the paragraphs more than once, and I make mental notes. And it helps when it comes to do practical stuff.
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Old 13th March 2010, 18:42   #38
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Great write up samurai... We need to do the combined OTR (south and west) as suggested by DKG. Will be great fun!!!
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Old 13th March 2010, 23:46   #39
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Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
@Samurai as always what an awesome writeup
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Originally Posted by wanderhermit View Post
Samurai San, you explain offroading so well that I rarely give a miss to your write ups.
The best part is that all technical part is explained from the point of view of amateur.
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Originally Posted by Tejas@perioimpl View Post
Great write up samurai...
Samurai, we missed your photographs.
I always look for your post mainly the OTR reports your writing style is simple but very informative. I don't remember how many times i have read your How to live with a CJ340 or similar Jeep? thread.

Also i should mention the TEAM BHP & JEEP-THRILLS spirit and the helpful nature i experienced in the Chikkaballapur OTR. I have no words to explain.
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Old 15th March 2010, 21:50   #40
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Originally Posted by whitemm550 View Post
hmmn i second that, very rarely you get a jeep freak like samurai to have such high writing abilities
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
@Samurai as always what an awesome writeup
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Originally Posted by Tejas@perioimpl View Post
Great write up samurai... We need to do the combined OTR (south and west) as suggested by DKG. Will be great fun!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by mohang_j View Post
Samurai, we missed your photographs.
I always look for your post mainly the OTR reports your writing style is simple but very informative. I don't remember how many times i have read your How to live with a CJ340 or similar Jeep? thread.
Thanks for all the appreciation guys, it really compensates for all the long durations of writing/editing after the event.

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Originally Posted by wanderhermit View Post
Samurai San, you explain offroading so well that I rarely give a miss to your write ups. I would say that if you were my maths teacher, way back in school, I would have scored a 100 out of 100.

The best part is that all technical part is explained from the point of view of amateur. I think a expert is guy who never gives up learning. Thanx for sharing your offroading experiences. It is a good learning experience for newbies like me. Sometimes I read some of the paragraphs more than once, and I make mental notes. And it helps when it comes to do practical stuff.
This is probably one of the nicest compliments I have received till date. And you are right. Ever since college, I have always tried to breakdown complex ideas into simple & easy-to-understand format, for my own understanding. It helped me in engg college labs (not in exams though), in my career, and now in offroading too.
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Old 16th March 2010, 21:42   #41
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A wonderful read Samurai. You guys down South are quite an organized lot and also enjoy some wonderfully varied offroad terrain.
Getting stuck in the middle of somewhere and nowhere with a broken leaf spring is indeed a scary proposition. Glad you got lucky.
I wish I could join you guys someday... if I could find out about about the dates and plan in a little advance.

Cheers,

Jay
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