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Old 20th November 2009, 10:42   #31
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I agree that the dust is a killer.
I got the air filter cleaned just before leaving, and by the time we crossed morey plains, the safari was struggling up Tanglang La. The buses ahead of us were constantly churning up a dust storm.
At Leh the air filter band was "RED". Barely 500kms of driving had done that to it.
After few days up there, while coming back the air filter red band slightly visible again.
Finally at the 30K service the air filter was replaced, and the band was full red.
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Old 20th November 2009, 22:01   #32
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Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
I agree that the dust is a killer.
I got the air filter cleaned just before leaving, and by the time we crossed morey plains, the safari was struggling up Tanglang La. The buses ahead of us were constantly churning up a dust storm.
At Leh the air filter band was "RED". Barely 500kms of driving had done that to it.
After few days up there, while coming back the air filter red band slightly visible again.
Finally at the 30K service the air filter was replaced, and the band was full red.
One old Army trick is to secure a piece of panty hose over the air intake with a radiator hose clamp. The panty hose synthetic happily has the right size mesh to keep a lot of dust out while letting air in. Army guys use it on their vehicles in desert and dusty areas. You have to be careful with it. You must continually check it and clean it and change it. You do not want it deteriorating or getting loose and being injested into the intake. No joke, it is an old trick that works, even if it makes engineers cringe.
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Old 20th November 2009, 22:46   #33
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@Dan, the air-filter inlet in the Safari is placed similar to what's in the Sumo. In this case, how would you put this additional filter ?

Last edited by condor : 20th November 2009 at 22:48.
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Old 21st November 2009, 01:05   #34
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Hi, This will be my first post in T-Bhp.

Based on my theoretical knowledge, as a mech engg student at IITG, all engines no matter what, will loose power as altitude increases. Tuning will not help you increase power, but will help you in burning the fuel in a better and cleaner way, and thus cause less damage to the engine.

And diesels will in general lose less power than petrol engines. This because all diesel engines are lean burning engines, that is they always have an excess of air to burn the fuel. So even if you loose a little bit of air, you still have quite a good bit to burn the fuel. But you will still lose some amount of power.

So you are still better off with the Jeep, as it anyways has more torque on offer than the Gypsy.

As for comparision between a TC and NA engine, both will lose power, as at the end of the day there is less air.

I have myself travelled upto 16000ft in Sikkim, in a Tata Spacio. The vehicle was smoking very heavily indeed, but still pulling cleanly even in 3rd gear over heavy inclines. And I have seen Maruti Vans and Maruti 800s going upto 14000ft with a full load of passengers.

So, all you need is a well maintained, spic and span engine, and you should be off. Though going in convoy would be a good option, and also to carry some basic spares and tools.
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Old 21st November 2009, 03:41   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by condor View Post
@Dan, the air-filter inlet in the Safari is placed similar to what's in the Sumo. In this case, how would you put this additional filter ?
Ah! Good question. I almost forgot, I took the intake hose out of its usual hole in the wheel well, plugged that hole with a rag and just redirected the hose toward the front of the vehicle and let it sit loose in front of the air filter. It is also a much cleaner, dust free place to get air.
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Old 21st November 2009, 08:30   #36
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In any event, the ECU will be more than capable of managing the low-oxygen ambience appropriately.
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Old 22nd November 2009, 09:59   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinod_nookala View Post
Doing high altitudes in a Gypsy is no fun, its boringly reliable. Do it in your jeep and your cost will also be less.
Vinod, your envy worded differently

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Originally Posted by khan_sultan View Post
Hey Sree,

Don't bother about all this. Take my Gypsy and go. You pay the fuel bill and I will be your designated driver :-)

Cheers,
Smart man, you are! What about driver batta - is it complimentary!

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In any event, the ECU will be more than capable of managing the low-oxygen ambience appropriately.
I doubt the 540/550 has ECU. And even with ECU engines and O2 sensor etc, what the sensor will do is only detect presence of O2 and reduce the A/F mixture appropriately - Not increase O2 supply sir!
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Old 22nd November 2009, 10:09   #38
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Quote:
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And even with ECU engines and O2 sensor etc, what the sensor will do is only detect presence of O2 and reduce the A/F mixture appropriately - Not increase O2 supply sir!
A very different Insight!!! This killed the myth of CRDe Motor being good there at high Altitude. Yeah the best it can do is, calibrate the A/F mixture.

Thanks Vikram
--Sree--
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Old 22nd November 2009, 22:14   #39
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Question Dual Air Filters?

Which is better? Oil bath air filter? Or the Dry Paper type?
Ever contemplated a "In SERIES" dual air filter?

What are the Pro's and Con's of such a setup? (Crude Representation of 2 air filters)

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Old 23rd November 2009, 00:52   #40
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@theMAG

ECU will be able to detect the lower air pressures and accordingly adjust the fuel being supplied, but this will not help in curbing the loss of power. This will just ensure that clean and proper burning of fuel continues no matter what the external air pressures.
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Old 23rd November 2009, 02:05   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svsantosh View Post

Ever contemplated a "In SERIES" dual air filter?

What are the Pro's and Con's of such a setup? (Crude Representation of 2 air filters)
One filter is sufficient if it is clean. In dusty dirty climes the problem is not one of dirt getting into the motor. This is what your 'series' solution might solve. The real problem is keeping the filter clean and the air intake unrestricted. In this thread that means unrestricted at altitude.
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Old 23rd November 2009, 22:06   #42
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Hi,
Have used a similar vehicle (Armada Grand 4x4) quite extensively in Sikkim, Bhutan, and Arunachal.

As others have mentioned, the lack of power at high altitudes is very noticeable, but not a dealbreaker.

Only thing I'll add is that your starting system should be absolutely topnotch. And carry a small battery charger with you. Maybe even carry some ether! Had it not been for the friendly army guys in Haa, who gave me a tow start, I would have been in deep trouble.

Sutripta
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Old 24th November 2009, 15:48   #43
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WE did K'La in a gypsy retrofitted with an Isuzu Disel engine (why dont ask me). The loss in power is noticeable but manageable. There is smoke and black as it can be. Use a Ltr of kerosene for every 10 ltrs of diesel and the starting problem should be adequately under control. But do keep a tow rope and a smiling face with you always, and your jeep will conquer, absolutely no doubt.
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Old 24th November 2009, 17:14   #44
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Default What about the other 2.5K KM?

One really quick and maybe important question, from what I read/see you will be doing this from B'lore? Are we assuming your ride will make this 2.5K till the mountains (approx) ride without any issues?

For the experts- considering the roads we have now, the rides are expected to do long hours on constant high speeds.. will a jeep be able to take this toll?

If your vehicle does the trip until the mountains without a glitch... there is no doubt it will go all the way to "Leh"
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Old 24th November 2009, 17:54   #45
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Originally Posted by SamuraiJack View Post
One really quick and maybe important question, from what I read/see you will be doing this from B'lore? Are we assuming your ride will make this 2.5K till the mountains (approx) ride without any issues?

For the experts- considering the roads we have now, the rides are expected to do long hours on constant high speeds.. will a jeep be able to take this toll?

If your vehicle does the trip until the mountains without a glitch... there is no doubt it will go all the way to "Leh"
On road travel in Jeep is doable, provided your vehicle is in a Good condition. I have covered around 700KM in a day without any problem. Max speed being 80-90KM/H. For this trip, i am planning to drive on daytime only. Jeep will be installed with an A/C before this. And this journey will not end at Leh. I will cover K'La and M'la :-)

Thanks
--Sree--

Last edited by sreerajunnithan : 24th November 2009 at 17:55.
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