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Old 13th April 2013, 08:57   #16
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Default re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

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Originally Posted by rockycrawler View Post
But this whole deal about BIS has made me reluctant - none of us wants to park 1L worth of rubber at any rat infested customs warehouse wasting away. I checked within my network at TNT senior management, and they promptly told me not to attempt this since they are unable to extricate it out of customs without the ISI imprint. I am not sure how FedEx does it. Is there anyone that has followed Karan's thread successfully after the BIS notification?
Hi there.

Congrats. Good looking LC build you have going there. Having used these "Land Yachts" a lot in the ME, used to have an impression that they are more suited for desert mile munching rather than offroading in Indian conditions. Must admit, I was pleasantly surprised when I saw one performing recently in an event, a nicely souped up one from Kottayam.

Regarding your tire trouble, the ISI marking rule is only applicable for "Commercial purposes". i.e, a dealer cannot import them for resale. But individuals are allowed to import any tire for personal use. We (Our Biker club) regularly imports Superbike tires through DHL, FedEx, USPS, etc. You will have to pay tax on arrival, but no other issues. I think you can safely order through tirerack.com.

Cheers
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Old 13th April 2013, 12:00   #17
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Default re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

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Hi there.

Regarding your tire trouble, the ISI marking rule is only applicable for "Commercial purposes". i.e, a dealer cannot import them for resale. But individuals are allowed to import any tire for personal use. We (Our Biker club) regularly imports Superbike tires through DHL, FedEx, USPS, etc. You will have to pay tax on arrival, but no other issues. I think you can safely order through tirerack.com.

Cheers
Thanks brother, I am a Gulfy too... ...and did manage to own a used one there while being employed at a Hummer dealership (oh the H1... what fond memories I have... dune and wadi bashing)... that's an experience best left for another post.

I presumed the ISI needs were mandated for ALL tires regardless of category. So thanks for the reignition. I'll network and research a bit more before I take the plunge.

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I have a series 2a Land Rover which I have restored myself few years ago , but I love to have it in stock condition

Another is a 1989 model mm540 Jeep which I am using since then (89) -- now its at the end of its life cycle , I am having some wild thoughts for re building it .
Sudarshan .
Thanks Sudarshan for the opportunity to help. While I lean towards Toyota more, I am fascinated by just about any fourwheeler . And congratulations... ...it does take a lot of effort to keep such fine vintage stock.

The MM540 is quite the restorer's vehicle, lending itself to happily to customization for a variety of applications - rock crawling comes immediately to mind. Although I am quite new on the BHP scene to understand what is the more popular flavor among mud, rock, trailing / camping etc., perhaps you could start by describing what is it that you envision for this truck's use and we can go from there. There is a lot of help to restore it to its glory days, especially now that you have other, advanced (safer) alternatives at the click of a button.

I also have my eye on a 1974 Chevy Chevelle Classic - yes, right here in Bangalore - at a friend's workshop. He is in the fiberglass business, supplying OE bodykits for Lancer, Toyota, Skoda etc. but makes kits for all the cars that are out there. This beauty in MINT condition, color is mint green and she is just lying around for some love. Its a two door hard top coupe, and get this... all of the original glass, chrome AND paint is INTACT.... not a scratch. Interior needs work (Indian rats enjoy imported foam and leather, don't we all?) but overall, she is one fine lady.

But the TLC and MM540 first, and then the Chevy. Lets talk more.
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Old 13th April 2013, 14:26   #18
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Default re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

I suppose your stock size would be 275/70 R16 ?

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Originally Posted by rockycrawler View Post
[*]Sixth, and I hate that we dont get these in India... I am looking for 33" or 36" Yokohama Geolandar AT or equivalent... typically 315/75R16.. Any help is most welcome!!
You sure you can accommodate such wide rubber on your stock/existing 16" wheels ?

What is your current rim width ? If > 8 then not a problem

Check this for reference;

Name:  LC tires.jpg
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Last edited by karan561 : 13th April 2013 at 14:34.
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Old 13th April 2013, 19:08   #19
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Thanks Karan. Yes. OEM 80 series wheels are 16x8 with 4.5" offset and the maximum that people report based on their experience is 315s. Those that hadn't lifted their truck experienced some rubbing during flex but they either got 1/4" wheel spacers or extended bump stop pucks to counter it.

With a 6" lift, the max OD is 40" (if you are looking to build expedition type vehicles, in which case you will use a 3-link or 4-link suspension system) so with the 35s I am confident I won't rub.
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Old 14th April 2013, 20:54   #20
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

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Originally Posted by rockycrawler View Post
Thanks Karan. Yes. OEM 80 series wheels are 16x8 with 4.5" offset and the maximum that people report based on their experience is 315s. Those that hadn't lifted their truck experienced some rubbing during flex but they either got 1/4" wheel spacers or extended bump stop pucks to counter it.

With a 6" lift, the max OD is 40" (if you are looking to build expedition type vehicles, in which case you will use a 3-link or 4-link suspension system) so with the 35s I am confident I won't rub.
Fantastic then, Do keep us posted on your updates & the tire brand decision/availability etc

Last edited by karan561 : 14th April 2013 at 20:57.
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Old 15th April 2013, 16:29   #21
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

With 315 tyres even the gearing ratios become too tall. Not a good idea. More trouble than any benefit.
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Old 25th April 2013, 01:00   #22
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

I hear you, but you do get ring and pinion gear sets which will sit within the same housings. I have done this on a couple of cruisers myself both in the ME and the US. Ratios available are several, but 4.88 is ideal for my application. My recommendations for the 80 Series
Stock 4.11
33" tires 4.56
35" tires 4.88
37" tires 5.29

A lifted truck provides significant articulation over challenges, more so when aided by suitably sized tires for the challenge. But if you want to keep the right amount of torque, upgrade gear sets to a high performance ring and pinion duo. On a 5 Speed transmission you can keep your engine RPM's under 2000 at ~100 kmph while running a 4.88 (I have seen it for even 42" tyres, no sweat).
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Old 1st May 2013, 22:08   #23
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Following is my shortlist for the 315 75 r16 A/T. I have the opportunity to visit KL along with my family in a couple of weeks. Any recommendations? Pros / Cons? Experience tips?

Should I just buy the tires there and fly them back with us? Have any of you done this before? I will be returning to Bangalore so any customs' advice for me? Thanks in advance.

1. BF Goodrich A/T T/A KO
2. Firestone Destination A/T
3. Yokohama Geolandar
4. Toyo Open Country A/T
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Old 5th May 2013, 20:08   #24
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Rockycrawler, noticed you used dynamat and hoodliner on the firewall. Was the primary intention to reduce engine noise filtering into the cabin? Have been researching dynamat hoodliner and now 'dynapad' for this reason. Planning to do some of this on my montero to reduce the effect of engine noise in the cabin. Appreciate you pointing me in the right direction or alternatively dropping me an email at ravi at rearwheeldrive.in

Thanks, Ravi
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Old 6th May 2013, 03:58   #25
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

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Rockycrawler, noticed you used dynamat and hoodliner on the firewall. Was the primary intention to reduce engine noise filtering into the cabin? Have been researching dynamat hoodliner and now 'dynapad' for this reason. Planning to do some of this on my montero to reduce the effect of engine noise in the cabin. Appreciate you pointing me in the right direction or alternatively dropping me an email at ravi at rearwheeldrive.in

Thanks, Ravi
Glad to help Ravi. Yes. I did quite a bit of research on the web, made calls to Dynamat themselves before I put the Dynamat followed by Hoodliner on the firewall from the engine bay. I also doubled it using Dynamat and Dynapad Pro on the cab side. Toyota also recommended me to change the factory hood shield as well, so I got a new one from them.

For my needs, I bought in the following:

2 Boxes of Dynamat 10435 12" x 36" x 0.067" Thick Self-Adhesive Sound Deadener with Xtreme Door Kit, (Set of 4)

3 boxes of Dynamat 10455 18" x 32" x 0.067" Thick Self-Adhesive Sound Deadener with Xtreme Bulk Pack, (Set of 9)

1 sheet of Dynamat DynaPad 12 square feet

1 Dynamat 10007 Dyna-Roller Professional Heavy Duty Sound Deadener Installation Tool with Wood Handle and 2" Wide Rubber Roller - Believe me, it is so much easier with this one. Other workarounds, don't work at all!

2 Dynamat 11905 HOODLINER 32IN X 54IN

For your Montero, I would say that you would need approx. same amount if you are planning to pull everything out and redoing like I did - if it's only inside the cab and doors, perhaps you could knock set of 9 to 2 instead of 3.

Sometimes, it is difficult to get the factory glue off of the car (my headliner had some reinforced insulation) so you may have to scrape it out. Although a heat gun isn't required, I tried to use it just for kicks - the sheet did become quite hot but very pliable. You are likely to use the hear gun on the door panels from the inside i.e. after you remove the door pads, the butyl is a little stiff, getting them to stick to the underside of the door skins through the holes in the door aprons can be aggravating. But take care not to to apply too much heat otherwise you will crack the paint on the door outside. And as Dynamat advice, you don't need to cover the whole door, just strip and patch enough to absorb the sound devils - I eyeballed the whole thing.

Tailgate also receives same treatment as rest of the doors.

And then also be careful to watch out for holes and welded nuts where bolts, nuts, clips etc. go. For instance, the plastic clips that hold the interior trim panels, A pillar trims that cover the seat belts etc. The panels themselves need just about enough room for the clips to snap in and stay snug, and the 4mm will put up a fuss if its not judiciously laid out in these areas. And getting the stuff out once its stuck is a nightmare! So watch out with some test fits, and if the clips snap in easily you are good to go.

Leave it on the truck overnight and roll out any sheets that may begin to peel or bubble away once again in the morning using heat if you really need to.

There's really nothing to it. If I can do it, you can! Have fun Dynamatting and let me know if there are any other questions.
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Old 6th May 2013, 16:13   #26
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

On an added note, Dynapad isn't the sticky variety i.e. you can't peel the backing and stick it. It just goes within the cab i.e. it is cut and placed on top of the Dynamtted floor before the carpet is re-installed. One can't use Dynapad in the engine bay - it isn't designed for that application.
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Old 1st June 2013, 12:39   #27
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Well fellas, it has been an eventful trip to Malaysia and back. Apart from the sightseeing bits of it, you are now looking at the proud owner of not one but 5 spanking new 315/75R16s Cooper Discoverer AT3s. I reached earlier this morning, exhausted but exhilarated with my purchase and subsequent experience flying with them. So what have I learnt??

Tyres are NOT bonafide baggage, and neither are other vehicle auto spares. So carrying them as checked in is a very bad idea and a potentially huge risk. Despite me verifying multiple times about size / weight / nature of tyres as checked in goods and even getting Malaysia airlines to endorse comments on my ticket, I now realize that airlines will fly just about anything because its all freight to them. Customs clamp down, especially on tyres, even for personal use, is very intense. I was made aware last night by a very forthright yet magnanimous and lenient customs commissioner about this.

a) the consignment price - immediate internet access gives them a working price to fix (surprisingly they look for the lowest cost... sites such as performance plus) and so your 'arranged' invoice will not work!
b) a ~22% for CIF charges on this value
d) 36.05 % duty on a) + b)
e) Since this is now considered as an offence, so you are fined and the quantum depends upon the Commissioner your will be interacting with (not the uniformed officers). This is based on the discretion of the commissioner who further gets reviewed - especially for tyres import. So it's his job if he doesn't fine you, but you can still plead!
f) The checked-in tyres are now considered as confiscated, but it is only natural thatyou are allowed an opportunity to redeem them. So you have to pay up a redemption fee, once again on the Commissioner's discretion.

So total is now a + b+ c + d + e + f!!!

And trust me, the Commissioner cadre consists of a sharp bunch of people, excellent communication skills, very fluent with the vernacular of the current law and very well informed - and above all, they are IRS (like IAS). India, seems to be shining after all!

My fines and my duties were quite lenient (thank you Mr. Commissioner Sir) and ended up costing me about Rs 24K per tyre. Would masKargo have been cheaper?? Certainly not from the looks of it since they would do door to door at RM 13 per kilo from KL excluding the levies - which would have put me well in the Rs. 38K per tyre range (each tyre weighs about 29.8KGs) and the Malaysia Ringgit is about Rs. 18.56. DO the math for 5 tyres and you will end up with ~Rs. 37K, plus levies.

So what have I learnt?

1. Vacations should stay vacations. While I didn't explicitly go with the intention of shopping for tyres, I grabbed the chance since I was looking for this particular size. Still, I could have managed this better using freight!
2. Trying to mooch off on duties based on collective allowances does not work (despite however cute your family is. Mine are 5 and 7 year old girls )
3. Airlines will fly anything as checked in baggage (except prohibited ones of course). Tyres are auto parts are commercial in nature. The best place to verify is the website / pdf at http://www.cbec.gov.in/trvler-guide_ason22may2013.pdf.
4. If you do really want those tyres or headers, then don't cringe on paying up for freight or duties. Afterall, trying to outsmart customs isn't worth the hassle!

I now realize I got off quite lucky with other bits on earlier travels - but those are stories for another day. For now, the smell of the rubber stack in my living room is incessantly drawing me to ogle!

Drool!!!
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Old 2nd June 2013, 16:30   #28
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Cooper Discoverer 315/75R16 AT3.

Here's a photoshopped pic. I didn't feel like unwrapping just yet but wanted y'all to know the treads - refined, yet aggressive. Read good reviews, very well mannered on the street (I am dynamatted so I suspect my ride to be more quieter) as well as OTR. I have located 5 military surplus 40" Dunlop in the US - when I visit next I will ship them home for my trail runs. I usually rotate with discipline for even wear (the kids' 7 year old Verna's set gave 73000 km before I changed them for the first time a year ago). With this, I will be doubly careful.

Name:  tyretread.jpg
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Next week, I am off to Manila on work. Will look for add-ons for the truck. If any of y'all have some interesting things I can pick up from there, let me know.

Later!

Last edited by Aditya : 20th August 2017 at 18:51. Reason: Inserting image
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Old 2nd June 2013, 19:03   #29
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

@rockycrawler - There is no better feeling than buying a brand new set of tyres!! Now time for you to put them on and post some pics.
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Old 22nd June 2013, 23:31   #30
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Default Re: Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now

Tyres on...

Work had become suddenly hectic, another trip to Manila and visitors from elsewhere kept me chained to my desk and the restoration on the back burner.

Went to Toyota today to put on the Coopers - only 4 of these 35s fit in my trusty Verna (you can imagine how cramped I would have been, and I am by no means calorie-deficient). It took me about 4 hours in total, and no they aren't balanced yet. The balancer looked so flimsy after it all, and I didnt want to risk bending that wheel - I need to find someone in Bangalore to do this later.

So here's what went on!

The Coopers are about ~35" diameter (spec sheet says 34.5) while stock is 31".
Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now-20-cooper-discoverer-at3-31575r16.jpg

As you lay them on the ground, or even on top of the other, the incremental doesn't seem large. But bear in mind that the Cooper is ~30 kg by itself (without the rim) and recommended is 50 psi.
Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now-21-cooper-35s-vs-stampede-31s.jpg

And Everest with her new shoes (condenser is being cleaned thus the toothless grin!)
Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now-22-80-series-cooper-discoverer-at3-1.jpg

Side on stunner!
Introducing "Everest", my 1997 Toyota Landcruiser. Then and now-23-80-series-cooper-discoverer-at3-2.jpg

Some points to ponder!

When attempting to slip on larger tyres, make sure that the hydraulic jacks can "rise to the occasion" - they may push the axles upwards enough to remove, but you need to gauge the fit for the larger wheels going in. I used a pneumatic lift reserved for higher loads so it was easy! Besides, you will need horses (or tripods) to stand the vehicle on, and I didnt find a size suited for this one within the dealership. So I just hogged the lift for the duration.

You are obviously going to need a tire changer. And no, I am not talking about grubby dudes in greasy roopa banians with hammer and tyre irons, banging away at your alloys, killing the bead locks while wrenching them out. I am talking about the smooth John Bean, which, with a little bit of elbow grease (and hmmm.. ok, tyre iron is somewhat needed), you can pull easily out the old and put in the new. And the alloys (and your heart) wont ever feel the burn or the pain.

Air fill wasn't fun. Because the aspect ration is greater, the larger side wall will fight and not allow the bead to slip easily onto the rim wall and air will escape from the sides. So even after a lot of jumping, throwing and cursing, all one would have done is nothing much. What to do?

Here's the trick. Hold a couple of tread blocks and lift the tyre as it lies on the tyre changer (with the valve on the top side), just enough to cover the valve. Start the air flow. While pressure is at ~ 50 psi through the nozzles, there will be leak on the underside, where the bead somewhat held on, but leakage pressure is nowhere near what you are pumping in. Soon you will see it begin to balloon and will "plomp" into place.

It took me a couple of hours to sort this all out and get the old ones out and the new ones shod on. Surprisingly the 235/70R16 Stampede still has good bit of tread left in them!

Next up - matte black rims, two batteries (yeah she needs two), and then it is off for wheel and track alignment (we pulled the axles remember!) After that vibration tests - I already have the DCs for driveline vibes, and am ordering castor correction bushes for any wobble.

Then it is regearing front and rear differential to 4.88! But that wont be done in a day I guess. Keep wishing me luck!
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