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Old 10th March 2010, 12:06   #241
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Originally Posted by abhipuru16 View Post
1. Why does frankmehta's car has 2 crossovers?
2. What do three way components look like?
I believe Frank has components for the front and rear. hence he has 2 pairs of crossovers. If you post a link to what you are refering to it might help us better.

3 way components include a woofer, midrange and a tweeter. the crossover is also a 3 way crossover seperating audio frequencies into bass, mids, and highs.

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Originally Posted by abhipuru16 View Post
What are 2 component systems, 3 components systems etc.? What do they mean and do?

What does a crossover do and how is it connected? Any connection diagram? Also, I see some cars like frankmehta's where two identical crossovers can be seen. Why 2?
2 componennts ususally are a wofoer and tweeter. 3 incoude a midrange that fits between the woofer and tweeter. 2 way XOs usually crossover about 2khz ro thereabouts, 3 way XOs crossover at say 600Hz and say 4kHz.

I have no idea which of Frank Metha's installs (he has redone his install a few times) you are refering to so cannot explain what Frank has done.
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Old 10th March 2010, 16:09   #242
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http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/sound-...und-sgood.html

Here you go, this is the thread that is confusing me. What are the connections like in here? I see two red coloured Alpine crossovers. Apart from that can you post a schematic diagram of what might have been done?
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Old 10th March 2010, 16:40   #243
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OMG. That is one crossover for the left channel and one for the right channel. You need seperate crossovers for every channel of sound.
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Old 10th March 2010, 17:02   #244
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Okay so I have kind of simplified my query with a diagram. I have encircled the connections in the pic in pairs as I think they would be of the form L+ L-. So, here it goes-

Glossary- ICE terminology-p1020868-desktop-resolution.jpg

Yellow-? (I think it's input but still where does it come from?)
Red- Vacant, why?
Green-??
Blue-??

I think green and blue are outputs but still I want you to explain me the whole plethora of connections going around here.
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Old 10th March 2010, 17:06   #245
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Originally Posted by navin View Post
OMG. That is one crossover for the left channel and one for the right channel. You need seperate crossovers for every channel of sound.
Oh yeah! I got that after I heard that he doesn't use any rear speakers, it was just the front stage. Now, the connections query please, I know I am getting you irritated.

Last edited by abhipuru16 : 10th March 2010 at 17:13.
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Old 10th March 2010, 17:32   #246
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abhipuru16 View Post
Okay so I have kind of simplified my query with a diagram. I have encircled the connections in the pic in pairs as I think they would be of the form L+ L-. So, here it goes-

Attachment 304580

Yellow-? (I think it's input but still where does it come from?)
Red- Vacant, why?
Green-??
Blue-??

I think green and blue are outputs but still I want you to explain me the whole plethora of connections going around here.
For Bi-amping the speakers
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Old 10th March 2010, 17:37   #247
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^^Didn't get you at all!
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Old 10th March 2010, 17:53   #248
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Originally Posted by abhipuru16 View Post
^^Didn't get you at all!
Bi-amping is the practice of using two audio amplifiers to power a set of loudspeakers.

In this case, 2 amplifiers can be used to feed the crossover and then the power gets split to the twweter and mid-bass.
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Old 10th March 2010, 19:36   #249
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Well, just tell me the connections that are there encircled in the pic. I'll understand it better then.
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Old 11th March 2010, 11:50   #250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abhipuru16 View Post
... connections that are there encircled in the pic ...
Yellow: Input from amp (normal case; not bi-amped) or Output from amp - signal meant to go to tweeter (if bi-amped)
Red: Input from amp - signal meant to go to mid-bass (if bi-amped)
Green: Output connection to tweeter (could be mid-bass; not sure)
Blue: Output connection to mid-bass (could be tweeter; not sure)
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Old 11th March 2010, 15:32   #251
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1. LOl! What.'s the difference between output from amp and input from amp. 2. This input to the crossover, is it containing mixed frequencies?
3. Here it is a 2-way crossover so, does it divide the frequencies as highs and mids? No lows?
4. What would have technically happened if the other input was also used, or simply what would bi amping do to the 2-way components here? What would be the benefit?
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Old 4th September 2010, 11:17   #252
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Excellent. I had a question on amps too and I see this topic being already discussed.

My question : Is the output of the amp, that is being fed with a monotone input, as good as a DC power source ?

If yes, then, can we extend the same analogy and say that all an amplifier does is produce electricity of varying frequency and amplitude ?

If yes, then can we say that every type of signal transmitted through wires is just an electric current ?

Thanks.
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Old 5th September 2010, 16:51   #253
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Originally Posted by anku94 View Post
... My question : Is the output of the amp, that is being fed with a monotone input, as good as a DC power source ? ...
If by 'monotone input' you mean 'pure sine wave', no. DC has frequency = 0, and will be blocked by the capacitor(s) used at the input. DC amplifiers are a different ball-game, and are not used in audio. A sine wave, by definition, has to have a frequency, no matter how high or low (as long as it is non-zero).

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... If yes, then, can we extend the same analogy and say that all an amplifier does is produce electricity of varying frequency and amplitude ? ...
Yes (even if the answer to the previous question is No ). To be more precise, it really does not 'produce electricity' (no electrical input should be needed if one wants to use the word 'produce'). It only causes the voltage at the output terminals to replicate the input but with a much larger magnitude ('amplify'), and if a load is connected make current flow through the load.

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... If yes, then can we say that every type of signal transmitted through wires is just an electric current ? ...
Yes.

Last edited by DerAlte : 5th September 2010 at 16:53.
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Old 5th September 2010, 22:11   #254
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
If by 'monotone input' you mean 'pure sine wave', no. DC has frequency = 0, and will be blocked by the capacitor(s) used at the input. DC amplifiers are a different ball-game, and are not used in audio. A sine wave, by definition, has to have a frequency, no matter how high or low (as long as it is non-zero).
So, if I input a, say, 10 khz continuous beep into an amplifier, it wouldn't produce an output ?

Basically, I'm asking all these questions based on my theory [It's something I figured out myself, hence my theory ] that if we were to draw a current-time graph of a sound signal in a wire, it would be structurally similar to the pressure-time graph of the same signal as a sound wave. Am I right ?

If yes, then can a sound signal of a suitable amplitude and frequency be input into an amp to use it as an AC power source ?

Thanks.
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Old 6th September 2010, 10:28   #255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anku94 View Post
So, if I input a, say, 10 khz continuous beep into an amplifier, it wouldn't produce an output ?
Your original question was "Is the output of the amp, that is being fed with a monotone input, as good as a DC power source ?" - no, it cannot be a DC source (f=0). It will be an AC source (f != 0). How did you infer it wouldn't produce an output?

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Originally Posted by anku94 View Post
... Basically, I'm asking all these questions based on my theory [It's something I figured out myself, hence my theory ] ...
Perhaps it would be better to read up available physics / engineering text on the subject beforehand, otherwise this thread could do well without 'time-pass'.

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Originally Posted by anku94 View Post
... that if we were to draw a current-time graph of a sound signal in a wire, it would be structurally similar to the pressure-time graph of the same signal as a sound wave. Am I right ? ...
Two-thirds right! It is a 3-dimensional graph - the third dimension is Phase.

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Originally Posted by anku94 View Post
... If yes, then can a sound signal of a suitable amplitude and frequency be input into an amp to use it as an AC power source ? ...
No. An 'AC Power Source' is expected to PRODUCE a significant amount of energy converted from energy in another form, e.g. heat from fuel (steam-fed turbo-generator, auto alternator), potential energy (hydro-electric generator), stored energy (batteries -> Inverter) etc. An 'amplifier' USES energy from a source, e.g. alternator / batteries to increase the amplitude of the sound signal. The sound signal itself has very little energy to be of any practical use. So, if bad music makes you run away, the amplifier is not feeding energy into you to provide you energy for your locomotion - your body's (chemically) stored energy does.
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