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Old 19th July 2013, 17:02   #76
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

Nice post ifly! Really love reading something like this. In my younger days, i aspired to be a pilot(a military one at that!) but then god decided to give me myopia . With regards to bi-engined planes flying with only one engine, a pilot will have to control the opposite wing's flaps and the elevator to maintain balance since you have thrust from one engine and when the plane goes airborne, the plane will circle if the compensation from the flaps/elevator isnt given.
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Old 19th July 2013, 19:06   #77
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

This is a 5 star thread. Well started and can carry on. Well I am an A-netter (member of airliners.net) and an avid aviation fan. I love all the aircraft that fly. THey are engineering marvels in themselves. They might be A (Airbus) or B (Boeing) or misc (Cessna, Bombardier and the bunch of Russky companies). The pictures don't do this work horse of a reliable jet complete justice. I think this is the first time that a pilot has actually written this stuff so much like a travel report. Keep the pictures coming esp the cockpit ones which are so rare to see. Especially Indian airplanes with all types of symbology on them. I remember seeing a photo of a cockpit which had "Shubh Laabh" with handprints made with kumkum. It makes the aircraft so Indian. I loved that. Please do share the photos. IN short keep `em coming...!!!
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Old 19th July 2013, 19:26   #78
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

Fantastic information. Any idea why the pressure inside the airborne cabin is erratic ? I thought it would be simple to maintain a threshold of such pressure in the acceptable band given the sensor mechanisms and the compression/suction technology available on the aircrafts. Almost always an issue with more than half the flyers this pressure is. Has anyone observed any difference with regards to the cabin pressures in the 320s or 737s ?
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Old 19th July 2013, 19:52   #79
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by yogibear007 View Post
Fantastic information. Any idea why the pressure inside the airborne cabin is erratic ? I thought it would be simple to maintain a threshold of such pressure in the acceptable band given the sensor mechanisms and the compression/suction technology available on the aircrafts. Almost always an issue with more than half the flyers this pressure is. Has anyone observed any difference with regards to the cabin pressures in the 320s or 737s ?
The pressure has to change with the outside pressure, which varies with altitude. If the pressure difference between inside and outside is too much, the shell may fail causing pressure leakage. I have suffered sever headache when flying with a cold(flu).
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Old 19th July 2013, 19:57   #80
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by ifly View Post
Same situation here, there are these things called the JetStreams. Once we enter them, they have a speed of 200 to 500 kmph... And infact when we maintain just 900kmph... The same logic above applies.

@Saket- You sir, have left me impressed. It is very few people who know that about what you just said. It may come as a pleasant surprise to you, but the Indian skies are the most stringent to fly in, making them perhaps the safest! Much more than even the US.

No airplane can fly without a TCAS here along with a host of other equipment. I like to think of the airbus and Boeing as equally good airplanes.

[/b]
Interesting thread.

How often would you enter a 500 kmph jet stream? Anything you need to be aware of, other than the difference between ground speed and indicated air speed.

Why do you think Indian skies are the most stringent to fly in? I'm not so sure that the safety statistics show that India is the safest sky to fly in. Stringent regulations might not be the same as the most safe, but one would hope that stringent regulation would lead to safer aviation at least.

What version of TCAS is mandatory in India? Europe and the USA have TCAS mandatory requirement for most commercial airliners (well all fixed wing, turbine planes over a certain weight anyway). What is mandatory in India that isn't mandatory elsewhere?

Where did you get your pilots license and could you tell us a little about your hours and how you built them? What planes, how quickly etc.

thanks

Jeroen
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Old 19th July 2013, 20:14   #81
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by i74js View Post
No it will not, there are three controls namely aileron, elevator and rudder to contol the movement of the plane. The power of the engine is essentially converted into drag and lift, thereby maintaining the speed and altitude. One engine means less power and nothing beyond, though if failure of one engine occours at the crusing altitude, the pilot has to reduce the altitude to maintain speed else the plane can stall.

Hope this clarifies.
Not entirely true; on any multi engine plane, if you lose an engine, the pilot needs to deal immediately with asymmetric thrust. Going from two engines to one, or from four to three for instance, means not only less power but also asymmetric trust.

You counter it by applying opposite rudder and sometimes, depending on various factor aileron. That by itself introduces additional drag making the lack of power even more pronounced.

Every pilot learns to fly on a one engine plane. The next step is a twin engine plane. Believe me, qualifying on a twin, means that you have to show you can handle a twin engine plane, under all conditions, on one engine. E.g. take off, landing and other maneuvers. The lack of power by having one less engine and made worse by the additional drag is something you need to get used to and need to get a feel for.

Flying a twin on one engine requires more knowledge and skill than just having to fly an underpowered plane.

Jeroen
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Old 19th July 2013, 20:39   #82
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

Great Thread IFLY. The mini bus is indeed a beauty to fly. I have not flown it though but have plenty of pals who are currently flying them from whom I have understood the airbus systems architecture a bit.

Quote:
What version of TCAS is mandatory in India? Europe and the USA have TCAS mandatory requirement for most commercial airliners (well all fixed wing, turbine planes over a certain weight anyway). What is mandatory in India that isn't mandatory elsewhere?
Unless otherwise authorised by DGCA, no person shall operate in the Indian airspace, an aeroplane having maximum certified take off mass of 5700 Kgs. and above and having maximum certified passenger seating configuration (excluding any pilot seats) of more than 30 seats or maximum payload capacity of more than 3 tonnes, if such aeroplane is not equipped with Mode 'S' transponder. All other aircraft must be equipped with atleast MODE C TRANSPONDER
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Old 19th July 2013, 20:42   #83
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

Not directly related, but I thought people reading this thread would appreciate this video:



cya
R
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Old 19th July 2013, 21:25   #84
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by Rehaan View Post
Not directly related, but I thought people reading this thread would appreciate this video:
Woww...

One of the cleanest shots of an A330 do a controlled mid-air collision with the planet!

pEaCe

Last edited by Rudra Sen : 5th September 2013 at 08:02. Reason: Removed video link from the quote
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Old 19th July 2013, 22:00   #85
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by sandeepmdas View Post
What's missing still is a submariner.

BTW ifly is not the first pilot; IIRC we have at least one chopper pilot and a real fighter pilot -who flew Mirage 2000s- among us.

@ifly, the major difference you notice when you see a cockpit photo of an Airbus and a Boeing is that the former has no control yoke - which Boeing says the way to fly an airplane. Indeed the Air France A330 crash in south Atlantic a couple of years back is partially attributed to the side stick design of the AB. Would you comment on this matter?
I think a Bhpian called Neel flies Sukhois.

Cheers,

Jay
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Old 19th July 2013, 23:07   #86
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by BoeingDriver View Post
Unless otherwise authorised by DGCA, no person shall operate in the Indian airspace, an aeroplane having maximum certified take off mass of 5700 Kgs. and above and having maximum certified passenger seating configuration (excluding any pilot seats) of more than 30 seats or maximum payload capacity of more than 3 tonnes, if such aeroplane is not equipped with Mode 'S' transponder. All other aircraft must be equipped with atleast MODE C TRANSPONDER
Those are two different things. A mode C or S or whatever transponder and TCAS are two entirely different systems. They serve very different purposes.

The Indian transponder requirements are not different from anywhere else. You need at least a mode C in all B airspace don't you?
The statement was that Indians skies are the most stringent to fly in. I just want to understand what's different then. Haven't heard any factual argument yet.

As far as I'm aware India uses the ICAO air space classification with no exception. Correct me if I'm wrong. That also means basic communication and navigation requirements for aircraft operating in Indian airspace are identical to just about anywhere else in the world?

With all these pilots here on the forum shouldn't be to difficult to understand what's different in India compared to the rest of the world? I'd be interested to know, because I've been flying in most of the rest of the world, but (not yet) in India.

On the youtube video of the smoothest landing: It's been on the internet for quite a while with lots of people oh/ahing how great a landing it is. I'd like to hear from the pilots on this forum. I don't think it's a great landing at all. Certainly not the most safe way of landing.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 19th July 2013 at 23:22.
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Old 19th July 2013, 23:24   #87
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by Arch-Angel View Post
With regards to bi-engined planes flying with only one engine, a pilot will have to control the opposite wing's flaps and the elevator to maintain balance since you have thrust from one engine and when the plane goes airborne, the plane will circle if the compensation from the flaps/elevator isnt given.
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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Not entirely true; on any multi engine plane, if you lose an engine, the pilot needs to deal immediately with asymmetric thrust. Going from two engines to one, or from four to three for instance, means not only less power but also asymmetric trust.

You counter it by applying opposite rudder and sometimes, depending on various factor aileron. That by itself introduces additional drag making the lack of power even more pronounced.

Fordday.

Every pilot learns to fly on a one engine plane. The next step is a twin engine plane. Believe me, qualifying on a twin, means that you have to show you can handle a twin engine plane, under all conditions, on one engine. E.g. take off, landing and other maneuvers. The lack of power by having one less engine and made worse by the additional drag is something you need to get used to and need to get a feel for.

Flying a twin on one engine requires more knowledge and skill than just having to fly an underpowered plane.

Jeroen

Thanks. Some lucid responses to my query about flying on a single engine in a twin engine aircraft.

Of course I would like to hear more from others.

My query started based on my one time experiences of riding a power tiller and a cycle rickshaw.
In case of the tiller, to take a turn you need to apply brake to that side wheel.
In case of cycle rickshaw, only one wheel is powered which makes it tend to turn all the time so the rider needs to compensate this with front wheel steering.

Fordday.
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Old 20th July 2013, 00:12   #88
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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In case of cycle rickshaw, only one wheel is powered which makes it tend to turn all the time so the rider needs to compensate this with front wheel steering..
OT. You mean the three wheeler pedal rickshaw is one wheel drive? Now that you mention it, the two rear wheels connected by one solid axle would mean it will only go in straight line. The poor fellow, his energy spend would have been much less if his effort goes to both rear wheels.
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Old 20th July 2013, 09:25   #89
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Originally Posted by Guite View Post
OT. You mean the three wheeler pedal rickshaw is one wheel drive? Now that you mention it, the two rear wheels connected by one solid axle would mean it will only go in straight line. The poor fellow, his energy spend would have been much less if his effort goes to both rear wheels.
More OT. Yes, rickshaw is one wheel drive. You are correct about energy spend.

The reason for only one wheel powered is because there is no differential gear in the rickshaw.

Fordday.

Last edited by fordday : 20th July 2013 at 09:27. Reason: More info.
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Old 20th July 2013, 09:36   #90
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Default Re: Airbus A320 Long-Term, 3 Million KMs Review

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Originally Posted by fordday View Post
More OT. Yes, rickshaw is one wheel drive. You are correct about energy spend.

The reason for only one wheel powered is because there is no differential gear in the rickshaw.

Fordday.
which wheel?

(is powered?)
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