Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff > DIY - Do it yourself


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th March 2015, 14:04   #1
BHPian
 
antihero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Patnitop (J&K)
Posts: 91
Thanked: 147 Times
Default DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

DIY - Anti rust treatment and repainting a Maruti Gypsy MG410W rear cab.

History:
I own a 1996 Maruti Gypsy MG410W bought in September 2014 (details on this thread (1996 Maruti Gypsy MG410W - Going places)) . It was a privately owned Gypsy (as opposed to auctioned armed forces / government vehicle) with a custom hardtop and interiors. I plan to keep and use this Gypsy for the next 5 years or so.

Problem:
The previous owner had a floor carpet and a heatlon sheet glued to the Gypsy floor for reduced road noise and a plush interior. However over the years, water has seeped through the carpet and the health sheet. This water was held in place by the health sheet, leading a lot of rust spots in the rear cabin floor. Fortunately most of this just surface rust and can be removed with a violent scraping of sandpaper and wire brush. Some parts of the cabin floor are also covered in dried carpet glue which lends the cab a dirty brown finish. Now before I embark on a week-long complete DIY rear cab cleanup, I was wondering if this sequence of steps is the correct way to do it.

Preconditions:
1. I do not have an access to a paint gun
2. I live high up in the mountains so the environment is relatively dust free

Planned Steps:
  1. Applying sandpaper and wire brush to remove existing paint / surface rust / carpet glue and to expose sheet metal. I plan to use a wooden block with 80 grit sandpaper wrapped around it and then progressively move to a finer sandpaper. Cost ~ Rs 300 for sandpaper and wire brush. 3 days.
  2. Clean surface with thinner and alcohol
  3. Anti rust treatment with TUFSEAL RC800 CONVERUST. A Water based Rust Converter and Primer available on amazon india. Cost Rs 900. 1 day. From the supplier website: Converts Rust back to stable metal. Waterbased, Non Toxic. Overpaintable. Highly recommended primer coat in protective coating system. It cures at low temperature and very good wetting properties. No sandblasting required. Saves labor cost.
  4. Priming the floor with Zinc Phosphate Epoxy Primer using a paintbrush and roller. I have read that zinc phosphate primer should theoretically provides better rust protection as compared to a Red Oxide primer. Although, I am no empirical evidence to backup this fact. Cost of the primer - unknown. One to two litres should suffice. Zinc Phosphate Epoxy Primer information on Berger Paints website.
  5. Finish the top coat with a automotive matt white paint or aerosol spray paint. Time 2 days for 2 coats. Cost ~ Rs. 1000

Total
Total cost: Rs ~ 3500
Time: 7 days

Questions
  1. Does this sequence of steps seem correct? Am I missing something in this sequence?
  2. Any experience with Rust Converter chemical?
  3. Does anyone have experience with Zinc Phosphate Epoxy Primer? Is it really as good as the suggested link claims?
  4. Should I use aerosol spray can for top coat or a normal automotive paint with a paintbrush? Any advantages / disadvantages to either of these approaches?
  5. In addition, is there a way I can incorporate NVH reduction in the paint job itself? There are numerous underbody sound deadening coatings available. Are they worth the money? Should they be applied in lieu of primer, directly over the sheet metal or over the primer? Does it make sense to apply them inside the cab, or are they specific to underbody application only?

I plan to start work on the Gypsy this weekend.
Images
1. Rear cab overview
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0454.jpg

2. Wheel arches with dried carpet glue and rust
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0456.jpeg
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0458.jpg

3. Worst bit, may need to be cut off and a new metal sheet welded in place. Musing over what needs to be done. I am a fair welder, by the way.
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0457.jpg

Last edited by antihero : 19th March 2015 at 14:46. Reason: grammar checks and removed sms lingo
antihero is offline   (10) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2015, 15:13   #2
Team-BHP Support
 
Rehaan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 22,364
Thanked: 22,566 Times
Default re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Thread moved out from the Assembly Line (The "Assembly Line" Forum section) section. Thanks for sharing!
Rehaan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2015, 17:13   #3
Senior - BHPian
 
SunnyBoi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Mysore / B'lore
Posts: 1,582
Thanked: 2,765 Times
Default re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

I'll be doing something similar in the coming week but I'll give my inputs here, although the amount of rust I'm dealing with is nothing compared to yours

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
Applying sandpaper and wire brush to remove existing paint / surface rust / carpet glue and to expose sheet metal. I plan to use a wooden block with 80 grit sandpaper wrapped around it and then progressively move to a finer sandpaper. Cost ~ Rs 300 for sandpaper and wire brush. 3 days.

Clean surface with thinner and alcohol
Rather than thinner and alcohol, spray diesel and leave it for 10 minutes. Use a brush used to scrub tiles to rub and scrub the floor. This method will be faster than using thinner and alcohol. It will also help knock out loose rust flakes. Repeat if necessary.

Once done, wash the floor with surf/strong detergent to remove diesel residue. Dont worry if the surface starts to rust again as long as you do the rust treatment soon.

Use the wire brush to remove as much rust as possible. Don't bother with using sandpaper if you're going to use Tufseal Converust since you wont need to do any flattening per se after wire brush.

On my car though I'm not in a position to use sandpapers or wire brush (nooks and crannies) however I have couple of chemicals which will eat away rust on application and prep the surface for applying converust.

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
Anti rust treatment with TUFSEAL RC800 CONVERUST. A Water based Rust Converter and Primer available on amazon india. Cost Rs 900. 1 day. From the supplier website: Converts Rust back to stable metal. Waterbased, Non Toxic. Overpaintable. Highly recommended primer coat in protective coating system. It cures at low temperature and very good wetting properties. No sandblasting required. Saves labor cost.
I have ordered the same as well, expecting to get it early next week.

Converust is similar to Bilt Hamber Hydrate 80. Open the link below, and click the "How to Use" tab to see detailed usage instructions. Use this after removing as much rust as possible from using wire brush.

http://www.bilthamber.com/hydrate-80

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
Does this sequence of steps seem correct? Am I missing something in this sequence?
The sequence is correct; Glue Cleanup -> Rust Removal -> Rust treatment -> Primer -> top coat

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
Should I use aerosol spray can for top coat or a normal automotive paint with a paintbrush? Any advantages / disadvantages to either of these approaches?

In addition, is there a way I can incorporate NVH reduction in the paint job itself? There are numerous underbody sound deadening coatings available. Are they worth the money? Should they be applied in lieu of primer, directly over the sheet metal or over the primer? Does it make sense to apply them inside the cab, or are they specific to underbody application only?
If you're going to do damping/NVH reduction coatings then I feel the paint finish is going to be immaterial since it will be covered anyway.

I will be damping all metal surfaces on my car using tar sheets. You can try the same but I'd suggest you apply this after primer and save on paint costs

http://www.ebay.in/itm/171607190284?...84.m1497.l2649

Then on top you can just lay a carpet and you will be all set. You can also add couple of layers of damping/tar sheets then proceed with carpeting.

Good luck!

Last edited by SunnyBoi : 20th March 2015 at 17:14.
SunnyBoi is offline   (3) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2015, 18:39   #4
BHPian
 
antihero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Patnitop (J&K)
Posts: 91
Thanked: 147 Times
Default re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyBoi View Post
Rather than thinner and alcohol, spray diesel and leave it for 10 minutes. Use a brush used to scrub tiles to rub and scrub the floor. This method will be faster than using thinner and alcohol. It will also help knock out loose rust flakes. Repeat if necessary. Once done, wash the floor with surf/strong detergent to remove diesel residue. Dont worry if the surface starts to rust again as long as you do the rust treatment soon.
Good idea. The thinner and alcohol would have been longer and expensive

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyBoi View Post
Use the wire brush to remove as much rust as possible. Don't bother with using sandpaper if you're going to use Tufseal Converust since you wont need to do any flattening per se after wire brush.
I prefer using sandpaper to get it down to bare metal or atlas make the existing coat a bit rough so that it adheres better with primer

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyBoi View Post
The sequence is correct; Glue Cleanup -> Rust Removal -> Rust treatment -> Primer -> top coat
If you're going to do damping/NVH reduction coatings then I feel the paint finish is going to be immaterial since it will be covered anyway. I will be damping all metal surfaces on my car using tar sheets. You can try the same but I'd suggest you apply this after primer and save on paint costs. Then on top you can just lay a carpet and you will be all set. You can also add couple of layers of damping/tar sheets then proceed with carpeting.
Point noted. I need to read more about tar sheets and how they are used to make a valid reply. However your point about the sequence is duly noted.

Update:
The gypsy rear cab sandpaper priming is underway.
Prerequisites:
  1. Steel Wool
  2. 80 grit sandpaper
  3. Wood blocks
  4. Bucket and mug
  5. Vaseline

Steps:
  1. Wash cab with detergent. Pril or any dish washing liquid detergent in water makes a good start.
  2. Create a DIY sander block. Used an old table foot for a sander block and screwed sandpaper along its sides.

    DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0494.jpeg
    DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0495.jpeg
  3. Use steel wool in the sander block to get rid of tough rust spots. Use liberal amount of water (bucket and mug) to keep the surface wet and hands free of steel wool strands.
  4. Use 80 grit sandpaper with the sanding block for less rusty sills.
  5. After finishing use liberal amounts of vaseline on your hands to keep them moisturised.

Today has been rediscovering the abrasive power of steel wool and 80 grit sandpaper. Most of the tough rust is dealt with, but it did require a lot of It will take a couple of days to complete but the results are encouraging. See before and after
Before
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0493.jpeg

After
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0497.jpg

Note from Support - Please go through the forum rules (#11). Discussions involving alcohol in any context are not allowed.

Last edited by Eddy : 22nd March 2015 at 15:12. Reason: Note inline
antihero is offline   (9) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2015, 13:31   #5
GTO
Team-BHP Support
 
GTO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 47,718
Thanked: 88,950 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

I hope it's not too late, but whatever you do, please generously apply Wurth anti-corrosion coating before the paint. It is simply fabulous! Expensive, yet worth every paisa.

Based on Mod Jaggu's recommendation, I got my Jeep fully coated with Wurth back in 2011. I live right by the sea in Mumbai's awful weather. Still, there is no major formation of rust. Click here (Mahindra Classic 2.5L : In Tight New Clothes!) for more information.

Related Threads:

1 (Rust Control for Classic cars??)

2 (Underbody treatment / Anti-rust coating for the car)
GTO is offline   (4) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2015, 21:50   #6
BHPian
 
antihero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Patnitop (J&K)
Posts: 91
Thanked: 147 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
I hope it's not too late, but whatever you do, please generously apply Wurth anti-corrosion coating before the paint. It is simply fabulous! Expensive, yet worth every paisa.
Based on Mod Jaggu's recommendation, I got my Jeep fully coated with Wurth back in 2011. I live right by the sea in Mumbai's awful weather. Still, there is no major formation of rust.
  1. If you don't mind me asking, how "expensive" are we talking about here? A ballpark figure would be quite helpful.
  2. Can this coating go over the primer? Or is it a bare metal application? If tis is a post primer application, i can ask a few friends in Delhi to ship it across.

Thank you. These threads have helped me decide to keep this job a Do It Yourself (DIY) exercise.

A mixed bag of a day. Healthy living in dust free mountains usually means poor internet connectivity. Therefore, I came across GTO's excellent pointer a bit too late. Even if I had read it in time, I doubt there was much I could do about it. The nearest town (Jammu) is 100+ kilometres away and none of the vehicle stockists have not heard of Wurth's anticorrosion coating. I know because I spent an hour calling almost everyone I know. All they know is Wurth's disk brake cleaner. Welcome to the land of ignorance, and perhaps bliss. Anyway, I am not dejected and will continue with my plan.
  1. The floor plan has been scrubbed and while I was at it, I did scrub the custom hardtop for good measure.
  2. TUFSEAL RC800 CONVERUST was liberally applied to deep rust gashes. It does turn them black and hopefully it will seal off more rust creation. This remains to be seen though.
  3. The floorpan and the hardtop interior was scrupulously cleaned again with water and an old toothbrush for those nooks and crannies.
  4. Applied the first primer coat on some non critical hardtop panels. The primer is a Zinc Chromate like blend. I was unable to source a Zinc Phosphate primer, which theoretically offers much better antirust and anti alkali / acid protection. The primer was applied via a good old fashioned paintbrush. I quite like the olive green matte colour finish.
So far so good.

A healthier looking scrubbed cab
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0518.jpg

olive green primer goes on
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0519.jpg
antihero is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2015, 23:46   #7
Team-BHP Support
 
Jaggu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 17,742
Thanked: 7,449 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Has the metal given away and started holes on the bed? If so you need to do patch work. After that you can use zync oxide based primer and move on to wurth for protection and finally covering it with paint for protection. Make it multiple layers of all of the above.

Key is how clean you prepare for each of the steps and keep impurities away. All the very best.

All the details you need is here (My 1958 Mercedes-Benz Type 180a Ponton)
Jaggu is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2015, 10:32   #8
Senior - BHPian
 
ariesonu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Bombay
Posts: 1,090
Thanked: 1,271 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Though late to mention but 80 grit, the one you are using, can be very harsh for the type of job you are doing. It will create more scratches in good region around rusted one and cause further metal damage in future, and this comes from my own experience.
I agree with Jaggu that, in case you wish to keep her for another 5 years or so, then you should go for mild tinwork whereever deemed necessary. Its not as expensive as it sounds.
Now that you have removed panels, I suggest that you get insulation mats (they come from cheap to expensive types) too.
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/modifi...top-gypsy.html (Insulation for a Hard top Gypsy)
The link may give you some idea. This will help you winters.

Regards-Sonu

Last edited by ariesonu : 24th March 2015 at 10:34.
ariesonu is online now   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 25th March 2015, 23:30   #9
BHPian
 
antihero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Patnitop (J&K)
Posts: 91
Thanked: 147 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggu View Post
Has the metal given away and started holes on the bed? If so you need to do patch work. After that you can use zync oxide based primer and move on to wurth for protection and finally covering it with paint for protection. Make it multiple layers of all of the above.

Key is how clean you prepare for each of the steps and keep impurities away. All the very best.

All the details you need is here (My 1958 Mercedes-Benz Type 180a Ponton)
This is a splendid thread, i was so hooked that I had to resort to a text only browser (the only thing that works with poor 2g connection) to read this thread.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ariesonu View Post
I agree with Jaggu that, in case you wish to keep her for another 5 years or so, then you should go for mild tinwork whereever deemed necessary. Its not as expensive as it sounds.

Update:
Slow internet means less than optimal update frequency.

I managed to "convince" a welder here in the hills to lend me his apparatus for a day. He is closed on Tuesday, so me and my friend had most of Monday night and all of Tuesday to do a quality job of removing some rusty bits of floor panels and seal the patches with double metal sheets.

Today I had planned to go back to the primer application. However, here's the catch. It turns out that the olive green primer that I was raving about earlier turns out to be a Zinc Chromate based primer. As it turns out, this type of primer contains chromium(VI) compounds and there is sufficient evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of chromium(VI) compounds.
Nasty stuff and easily available in the indian auto market shops. Sigh!

From Wikipedia:
Recent studies have shown that not only is zinc chromate highly toxic, it is also a carcinogen. Exposure to zinc chromate can cause tissue ulceration and cancer. A study published in the British Journal of Industrial Medicine showed a significant correlation between the use of zinc chromate and lead chromate in factories and the number of cases in lung cancer experienced by the workers. Because of its toxicity the use of zinc chromate has greatly diminished in recent years.
So, if you are planning to prime your car / jeep / gypsy make sure you choose a less dangerous primer. Alternatives being Zinc oxide or Zinc Phosphate. As of now, the gypsy stands unloved as I am looking to lay my hands on some zinc phosphate primer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariesonu View Post
Now that you have removed panels, I suggest that you get insulation mats (they come from cheap to expensive types) too.
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/modifi...top-gypsy.html (Insulation for a Hard top Gypsy)
The link may give you some idea. This will help you winters.
Indeed insulation is the next big thing on my agenda. This winter I did record -9C while out trekking with the Gyspy. So insulation is something I am quite serious about. Thanks for this pertinent thread. I will keep the updates coming on Phase 2: aka insulation.
antihero is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 27th March 2015, 12:28   #10
BHPian
 
caged_nomad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Delhi/ Hyderaba
Posts: 36
Thanked: 38 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
Indeed insulation is the next big thing on my agenda. This winter I did record -9C while out trekking with the Gyspy. So insulation is something I am quite serious about. Thanks for this pertinent thread. I will keep the updates coming on Phase 2: aka insulation.
Hi anti hero, have you finalized the insulating material?
I found this link on a post regarding insulation of a Mahindra Thar, http://www.rockwoolindia.com/product...ding_roll.html
Thought you may want to have a look.
caged_nomad is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 28th March 2015, 10:13   #11
BHPian
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 228
Thanked: 122 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
...

Indeed insulation is the next big thing on my agenda. This winter I did record -9C while out trekking with the Gyspy. So insulation is something I am quite serious about. Thanks for this pertinent thread. I will keep the updates coming on Phase 2: aka insulation.
Try polystyrene (thermocol)- highly effective, inexpensive, and easy to work with.
fighterace is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 29th March 2015, 16:21   #12
Senior - BHPian
 
ariesonu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Bombay
Posts: 1,090
Thanked: 1,271 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by fighterace View Post
Try polystyrene (thermocol)- highly effective, inexpensive, and easy to work with.
ALWAYS ensure that any such insulation material is FIRE PROOF.

Regards-Sonu
ariesonu is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 30th March 2015, 22:57   #13
BHPian
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 228
Thanked: 122 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariesonu View Post
ALWAYS ensure that any such insulation material is FIRE PROOF.
Good point. Where does thermocol stand in this department? What would you suggest instead?
fighterace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th April 2015, 18:01   #14
BHPian
 
antihero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Patnitop (J&K)
Posts: 91
Thanked: 147 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

I have been kept busy by the recent rain and floods in J&K. An update is long overdue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggu View Post
Has the metal given away and started holes on the bed? If so you need to do patch work.
Thanks Jaggu, work done so far:
  1. Using an angle grinder to cut off a two patches in the floor which had rusted through
  2. Closing the cut offs by welding (underbody and overbody) metal sheets.
  3. Final rinse and clean
  4. First coat of red oxide primer goes on the floor

Next few days:
  1. Apply knifing putty and prepare surface
  2. Sandpaper primer with 180 grit and wipe clean
  3. Coat 2 of red oxide primer
  4. Sandpaper primer with 180 grit and wipe clean
  5. First coat Asian paints Premium Satin enamel
  6. Sandpaper with 320 grit and wipe clean
  7. Second coat Asian paints Premium Satin enamel

Now most of the choices have a health dimension to them
  • Red oxide - the least harmful primer. As i pointed out earlier Zinc Chromate primers are carcinogenic.
  • Asian paints Premium Satin enamel. Contains no added lead / mercury / arsenic or chromium according to their flyer. After 2008 Asian paints claim to be following EU norms (<180ppm) for lead content.
    The other and easier option would have been to use a Rustoleum spray enamel. But as I dug deep, this is what I found
    Quote:
    EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE - CHRONIC HAZARDS: Contains Titanium Dioxide. Titanium Dioxide is listed as a Group 2B-"Possibly carcinogenic to humans" by IARC. Significant exposure is not anticipated during brush application or drying. Risk of overexposure depends on duration and level of exposure to dust from repeated sanding of surfaces or spray mist and the actual concentration of Titanium Dioxide in the formula. May cause central nervous system disorder (e.g., narcosis involving a loss of coordination, weakness, fatigue, mental confusion, and blurred vision) and/or damage. Reports have associated repeated and prolonged occupational overexposure to solvents with permanent brain and nervous system damage.
    PRIMARY ROUTE(S) OF ENTRY: Eye Contact, Ingestion, Inhalation, Skin Absorption, Skin Contact
    From their web site

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariesonu View Post
ALWAYS ensure that any such insulation material is FIRE PROOF.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fighterace View Post
Good point. Where does thermocol stand in this department? What would you suggest instead?
Any consensus on this yet?
I am again planning on going the natural and easily available route here. Rockwool is out of the question and since I do not see why polystyrene will spontaneously combust, I might end up with that. But I am waiting for a better option, or a consensus here on what works best.

Oh and this is how things look like so far.
DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy-img_0579.jpg

Last edited by antihero : 6th April 2015 at 18:10. Reason: grammar checks and removed sms lingo
antihero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th April 2015, 18:16   #15
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Coimbatore / MENA
Posts: 673
Thanked: 973 Times
Default Re: DIY: Anti-rust treatment for a Gypsy

Quote:
Originally Posted by antihero View Post
[*] After finishing use liberal amounts of vaseline on your hands to keep them moisturised.
Good effort.

Just a suggestion. Try using some gloves while doing these kinds of jobs to avoid exposure.
Nitrile gloves like these:
http://www.ebay.in/itm/General-works...item3cf630001b
http://www.ebay.in/itm/Showa-380-Nit...item27fb0e1293

I have seen them in some local hardware shops as well.

Cheers
gthang is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Underbody treatment / Anti-rust coating for the car lottoman Technical Stuff 319 30th September 2017 03:45
Jeeps - Rust, Body decay and treatment lugnut 4x4 Technical 7 6th April 2010 20:13
Advise on Safari Dicor 2.2 Rust Treatment adc Technical Stuff 16 1st December 2008 11:59
Anti honda?? Anti suzi?? Anti fiat?? Anti ford etc etc?? Vent out ur opinions here!!! mclaren1885 Shifting gears 3 29th June 2006 14:23


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 10:32.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks