Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff > DIY - Do it yourself


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th June 2017, 20:57   #1546
Team-BHP Support
 
Gannu_1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Madras
Posts: 4,705
Thanked: 9,110 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by eko View Post
New cutter from ROCO brand. Very handy and is only 8 cm long. Available for Rs 100 in KSA. Has double side short blade. Good for office and home.
Do get the replacement blades as well. You'll need them. The sharpness wears out pretty quickly when you use it with plastics and such materials. The blade should be trapezoidal shaped like the one I have on my Stanley.
Gannu_1 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 11th July 2017, 21:23   #1547
BHPian
 
BlueEyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: B'lore
Posts: 109
Thanked: 134 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Guys, where can I get genuine Tesa tape? It's an urgent requirement!!
Checked in couple of auto spare shops but they were trying to sell some other brand. Ordering from ali would take minimum of 20-30 days. Any other website(quick shipment & delivery within couple of days) or shops in Bangalore I can go get it?
BlueEyes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12th July 2017, 00:29   #1548
Senior - BHPian
 
SunnyBoi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Mysore / B'lore
Posts: 1,445
Thanked: 2,153 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueEyes View Post
Guys, where can I get genuine Tesa tape? It's an urgent requirement!!
Checked in couple of auto spare shops but they were trying to sell some other brand. Ordering from ali would take minimum of 20-30 days. Any other website(quick shipment & delivery within couple of days) or shops in Bangalore I can go get it?
Try contacting the distributor

tesa Tapes (India) Pvt. Ltd.
301, 3rd Floor, Lakhani Centrium,
Plot No 27, Sec 15, CBD Belapur,
Navi Mumbai - 400614
Maharashtra
Phone +91 22 4741 9200
Fax +91 22 4741 9299
http://www.tesa.in
SunnyBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th July 2017, 01:57   #1549
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,599
Thanked: 6,683 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

SImple DIY Oiler

A while ago I remembered to buy the sewing machine oil that had been on my shopping list for ages. I brought it home, and, without even thinking, cut the top off the spout. Oh, that was very silly. A needle would have been the tool to open this container!

So, light machine oil. Yes, I have it, only it never rains but it pours.

Looking around Amazon, some of the precision oilers are actually rather nice, others are little more than bottles with needles. None seemed worth the price, or appealed as much as free.

Materials: Old medicine dropper bottle, emptied, cleaned, dried. Hypodermic syringe needle.

Found the latter in an old first-aid kit. First things first: rounded off the sharp point on a fine stone. I do not to oil anything so precisely that it gets dangerous!

Made the connecting end of the needle fit the dropper better better, packed and fixed with M-Seal: Oiler.

Tools for a DIYer-oiler1.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-oiler2.jpg


.
Thad E Ginathom is offline   (4) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 15:25   #1550
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,096
Thanked: 978 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
SImple DIY Oiler

A while ago I remembered to buy the sewing machine oil that had been on my shopping list for ages. I brought it home, and, without even thinking, cut the top off the spout. Oh, that was very silly. A needle would have been the tool to open this container!
.........

.
AT one time there was a 3-in-1 machine oil with a long flexible sprout. Sadly it is no longer available. Some thing similar

Name:  telespo78195243.jpg
Views: 462
Size:  26.5 KB
Aroy is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 16:02   #1551
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,599
Thanked: 6,683 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
AT one time there was a 3-in-1 machine oil with a long flexible sprout. Sadly it is no longer available. Some thing similar
That would be a good thing to have. For general purpose oiling, even the old-fashioned oil can would be nice. The needle oiler, though, will put a very small amount of oil just where you want it
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th July 2017, 11:05   #1552
BHPian
 
diyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 247
Thanked: 110 Times
Default

Hi I am wanting to switch. You godrej night latch and have a slightly better lock but it's key entry is smaller than the older one. Anyone know if there is an adapter for fitting this smaller lock into a larger hole? Any other ideas would be great. This is a DIY.
Attached Thumbnails
Tools for a DIYer-1500010517839.jpg  

diyguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th July 2017, 11:33   #1553
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,096
Thanked: 978 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy View Post
Hi I am wanting to switch. You godrej night latch and have a slightly better lock but it's key entry is smaller than the older one. Anyone know if there is an adapter for fitting this smaller lock into a larger hole? Any other ideas would be great. This is a DIY.
Fitting a smaller lock into a larger hole will need an adapter (a wooden collar), but that entails a security risk, unless the adapter has been fixed in a manner that it cannot be just hammered out.

A better idea would be to seal the existing hole and locate the new lock either above or below the existing one.
Aroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th July 2017, 17:48   #1554
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,599
Thanked: 6,683 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
Fitting a smaller lock into a larger hole will need an adapter (a wooden collar), but that entails a security risk, unless the adapter has been fixed in a manner that it cannot be just hammered out.
It must be 40 years since I was told that an epoxy-glue joint in wood is stronger than the wood around it, so this should not be too difficult!

Looks, and perceived security, could maybe improved by putting a steel circle under the new lock, bigger than the old hole. But... by the time is found/cut, just putting the new lock in a new place might turn out to have been the easier way to go!

I could say that fitting locks is not the easiest or quickest of quick jobs, but then I realised that this is DIYguy asking. So I'm sure he'd do a better, quicker job than I would.
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 07:03   #1555
BHPian
 
diyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 247
Thanked: 110 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
Fitting a smaller lock into a larger hole will need an adapter (a wooden collar), but that entails a security risk, unless the adapter has been fixed in a manner that it cannot be just hammered out.
Thanks Aroy, will look for a wooden collar. I do not want to seal this off and find another spot as it is more work . Was planning a larger steel washer kind to cover the collar so that the filling is not visible. The other reason for using the same spot is that the screw holes on the inside all line up as someone before me has switched locks a few times and the result is not pretty.
What would be good is if we get a steel plate that fits into this place covering the inside and outside of the door, like I've seen in the US.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
It must be 40 years since I was told that an epoxy-glue joint in wood is stronger than the wood around it, so this should not be too difficult!
I could say that fitting locks is not the easiest or quickest of quick jobs, but then I realised that this is DIYguy asking. So I'm sure he'd do a better, quicker job than I would.
I am guessing Epoxy glue is our erstwhile Fevicol. I will go harass the nearby hardware store owner who is somewhat tolerant of my questions on how to do stuff by myself . He used to tell me the plumber or carpenter would know, till he eventually realized that I was doing the repairs at home...

Last edited by diyguy : 16th July 2017 at 07:04.
diyguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 11:24   #1556
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,096
Thanked: 978 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

What you can do is the following

. Find a workshop that has a wood working lathe
. Get hold of a piece of wood block (same thickness as your door), and get it rounded in the lathe to a size marginally bigger than the existing hole
. Get the lathe operator to drill a pilot hole (say 5-6mm) in the centre. That way you get the true centre.
. Check the fit and if it is too tight sand it a bit. The piece should be tight enough to need a bit of hammering. Use wood glue on both the surfaces and hammer the piece into existing hole, so that it is a tight fit.
. Use a hole saw to drill a hole of the diameter of new lock
Name:  41vInyRKuyL.jpg
Views: 280
Size:  17.6 KB
http://www.amazon.in/19-64mm-Metal-A...s=hole+saw+set
http://www.amazon.in/Bosch-11-Piece-...s=hole+saw+set
. Once you have the hole, next use headless nails to secure the collar to the door, that is drive the nail from inside the hole towards the door, radially. Two nails at opposite end would do.

A hole saw is an excellent addition to tool set. Even if you use it once, it pays for itself. I bought one ten years ago and have made a few holes in plywood.
Aroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 12:50   #1557
BHPian
 
BlueEyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: B'lore
Posts: 109
Thanked: 134 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyBoi View Post
Try contacting the distributor
Thanks.
That's the first thing I did and the lady at the Mumbai office gave cellphone number of a sales guy. He gave couple of other numbers to contact but nobody gave concrete answer where I can get these rolls.
Finally, upon further digging I found a distributor here who would also sell small numbers for retail. So a Tesa 51608 would cost Rs.320 + GST. If anyone interested contact V3 Group, 08026572605 Geo location.

Also saw your earlier post about Dremel purchase. Have you put it to use? I been looking one for myself, nothing fancy just the basic stuff. There are just way too many choices. What's your feedback on the one you purchased?
BlueEyes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 13:17   #1558
BHPian
 
im_srini's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 926
Thanked: 308 Times
Post Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy View Post
Hi I am wanting to switch. You godrej night latch and have a slightly better lock but it's key entry is smaller than the older one.
Anyone know if there is an adapter for fitting this smaller lock into a larger hole ?
Hello, Godrej sells metal collars ( adapters ) just for this purpose, i.e. for upgrading from the "old" style night-latches to the newer models.
If you take advantage of the free install offer typically offered for the newer night-latches, the install guy will usually turn up with a bunch of these adapters.
One big advantage of these adapters is that they cover the original hole so well that it's impossible to figure out the difference in size of the lock barrel.
You could try checking with the hardware store from where you got the new night-latch if they carry these adapters too.
im_srini is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 13:29   #1559
BHPian
 
Prowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Madras
Posts: 475
Thanked: 263 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy View Post
I am guessing Epoxy glue is our erstwhile Fevicol. I will go harass the nearby hardware store owner who is somewhat tolerant of my questions on how to do stuff by myself . He used to tell me the plumber or carpenter would know, till he eventually realized that I was doing the repairs at home...
Don't go with Fevicol. There are better epoxies available now. Try JB Weld. It will bond with steel as well as wood.
Prowler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2017, 19:25   #1560
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,599
Thanked: 6,683 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy View Post
I am guessing Epoxy glue is our erstwhile Fevicol.
The white liquid stuff? No, this is an ordinary glue not an epoxy. Epoxy glues are stuff like Araldyte.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
Don't go with Fevicol. There are better epoxies available now. Try JB Weld. It will bond with steel as well as wood.
A sledgehammer of a glue! I would not think it is needed for this job, but, if one happened to have it, then fine. Is it available in India? Mine comes from London.

Now it is my turn to ask for glue advice!

We have a rather nice large umbrella. It has a wooden handle, and it has got broken (again :Frustrat) because we left it on the back seat of the car and someone sat on it.

The last time I did this repair, I had some glue that was ideal. It was a single-part glue, a white goo (That dried clear, I think) that expanded slightly (maybe it foamed a bit, not sure) so it could fill small gaps. After opening, the whole lot, in and out of the bottle, set in a few hours, so it was a one-job glue. Anybody got a clue what it might have been called? I think it was more of an industrial thing than a high-street product.
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bangalore : Fantastic store for tools kartikkumar Shifting gears 22 27th September 2012 01:15
Amplifier Installation Help: For DIYer nitin.dangayach In-Car Entertainment 52 10th March 2010 18:59
Power tools dadu Gadgets, Computers & Software 15 16th June 2008 12:05
tools for bike garage bullboy Motorbikes 1 11th September 2006 12:50


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 08:04.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks