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Old 4th August 2017, 19:59   #1606
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Originally Posted by Gannu_1 View Post
Ordered a floor jack (make: Duralift, capacity: 2 ton)
What would be it's minimum height? Trying to assess if it could get under my Harley to lift it (350 kgs) for maintenance tasks.

Cheers...
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Old 4th August 2017, 22:15   #1607
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Need some suggestions on bringing back life to our 2 decade old 3*6 single bed size cot made of teak wood. It has not been used for almost a year now and teak surface has lost it's sheen. Here is what I think I would need to achieve this:
  • Wood Sandpaper
  • Wood putty/filler
  • 3" brush & applicator
  • Primer
  • Wood polish(any particular kind for teak wood?)
My intention is not to paint any color. Just want to bring back that beautiful teak wood texture by filling some uneven surface, sand it, apply primer and finally apply the wood polish. Though I have painted walls few times, this is my first attempt something on the wood. Am I listing all things required? any other additions/suggestions are highly appreciated.

Also, What do I use to prepare the teak surface for this? just a damp cloth or any teak oil?
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Old 5th August 2017, 00:18   #1608
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Originally Posted by BlueEyes View Post
Need some suggestions on bringing back life to our 2 decade old 3*6 single bed size cot made of teak wood. It has not been used for almost a year now and teak surface has lost it's sheen. Here is what I think I would need to achieve this:
  • Wood Sandpaper
  • Wood putty/filler
  • 3" brush & applicator
  • Primer
  • Wood polish(any particular kind for teak wood?)
My intention is not to paint any color. Just want to bring back that beautiful teak wood texture by filling some uneven surface, sand it, apply primer and finally apply the wood polish. Though I have painted walls few times, this is my first attempt something on the wood. Am I listing all things required? any other additions/suggestions are highly appreciated.

Also, What do I use to prepare the teak surface for this? just a damp cloth or any teak oil?
What is the current finish applied on the wood?
You would first need to scrape it off completely till you reach raw wood. Check out a few videos on Youtube on how to do it.
After that there are some options that you can choose from for the new finish depending upon your budget. No need for any primer.
I have gone for basic Linseed Oil finish topped with buffed wax. This finish however doesn't last long and you need to reapply wax and buff it whenever it loses sheen. Time for that will depend on how roughly you use the furniture.
If the wood doesn't face too many climatic variations then you can go for clear water based PU finish. It is a very durable finish and it doesn't even give a yellow hue to like oil based PU finish.
You can also go for standard finishes like lacquer or a varnish.
Whatever you end up going for, buy a good quality product and if applying it yourself, practise a lot on test pieces so that you can learn how to apply it properly without leaving any drip marks.
P.S. - No need for any primer since you want a clear finish which shows the grains of the wood.

Last edited by rdst_1 : 5th August 2017 at 00:19.
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Old 5th August 2017, 12:50   #1609
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Thanks for all the tips.
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Originally Posted by rdst_1 View Post
What is the current finish applied on the wood?
Don't think anything is applied currently. Even if something was applied all worn out, see the pictures:
Tools for a DIYer-1.jpg

Quote:
You would first need to scrape it off completely till you reach raw wood. Check out a few videos on Youtube on how to do it.
Thanks. Yes, I been prepping for that Looks like I would need a 100 or 120 grit sandpaper.

Quote:
You can also go for standard finishes like lacquer or a varnish.
I have this wood polish lying at home, hope this will do justice to the pure teak wood.
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Old 9th August 2017, 13:36   #1610
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Originally Posted by Gannu_1 View Post
I didn't look any further. Placed an order and Amazon charged me Rs. 4598 to my CC. Costs 45 USD + shipping in the US but never mind.

Will update the thread once I receive it. Now I need a 32 mm 1/2" socket.
The torque wrench was delivered yesterday morn. It was supposed to be delivered a day before but by the time the Aramex delivery guy called, I had left the workplace.

It was delivered in a much bigger box but without any additional protection like bubble wrap or styrofoam!

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170808_115718.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170808_121411.jpg

I am glad the case wasn’t broken in transit! The case appears to be durable.

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170809_072606.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170809_072627.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170809_072802.jpg

Overall, the quality of the wrench is excellent and the knurled handle feels good to hold and operate:

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170809_072641.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-img_20170809_072732.jpg

Amazon indicated an August 12th delivery (which wouldn't have helped me) and later, updated the tracking info indicating the shipment was further delayed due to customs clearance. In the meantime, I also ran into KYC document issues since the documents I had uploaded previously were deemed unclear by Aramex and I had resent all the docs I had with me through the customer service. These guys are very prompt and I was getting quick responses to my mails.

All the tools required for the servicing is in place. Looking forward to this Friday now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dracul View Post
Is the jack can be used for SUV ?, as the height of the jack seems to be low.
Nope. For an SUV, this jack will not work. You'll need at least a jack with SWL rated at 3-4 ton and a raised height of at least 15" and above.

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Originally Posted by dkaile View Post
What would be it's minimum height?
Will check and let you know.
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Old 13th August 2017, 23:32   #1611
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I am planning to wire up three phase pilot lights, mounted in the wooden door behind which our meter, phase changer, etc, are mounted. The lights on the phase changer itself are hot and one is failing. And they are behind a door.

I'm expecting that LED lights, being only 20mA, will draw little current and produce little heat if permanently powered on. I wasn't planning to even provide switches. Is that a big mistake?

These are cabinet lights. I have modified the spec-sheet drawing to show how I intend to mount them in 20mm wood. First I will try one to check that it does not produce much heat!

Roughed in on the spec sheet...

Tools for a DIYer-pilot.jpg

I have 16mm and 22mm spade drills. does this make sense...

1. drill small pilot hole on centre line,
2. Drill 16mm from front to depth.
3. Drill 22mm hole from rear untill it meets front hole.

I am hoping that the sides of the 22mm hole will keep the spade bit straight enough after it's point has broken through into the 16mm hole.

Another Electrical Question.

Down at the end of the garden by the gate is my pit and submersible water-clearance pump. The pump has a float switch. It is wired back to an RCCB at the same cabinet. I thought it would be nice to know when this pump is on. So... I could wire a pilot light at the cabinet.

I thought to put it on the neutral side, in series with the pump. There then should be no voltage unless the pump is on.

Tools for a DIYer-schema.jpg

Will this work? Is it safe? The pump is a 7.5A beast. Would the pilot light explode?
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Old 14th August 2017, 12:55   #1612
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I am planning to wire up three phase pilot lights, mounted in the wooden door behind which our meter, phase changer, etc, are mounted.
if I understand you right you are installing phase indicators that are reliable. I installed one like this and it has run well for 3 years. You can consider something like this for space saving and longevity.
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Old 14th August 2017, 15:08   #1613
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You can consider something like this for space saving and longevity.
That is a really good idea, and I may get one of those for the distribution unit, which is in yet another place, but my current projext is to install the pilot lamps in this door, which I can see from the window just to the right of my desk


Tools for a DIYer-ebcupboard.jpg
sorry about the focus!
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Old 14th August 2017, 18:43   #1614
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I'm expecting that LED lights, being only 20mA, will draw little current and produce little heat if permanently powered on. I wasn't planning to even provide switches. Is that a big mistake?

Another Electrical Question.

Down at the end of the garden by the gate is my pit and submersible water-clearance pump. The pump has a float switch. It is wired back to an RCCB at the same cabinet. I thought it would be nice to know when this pump is on. So... I could wire a pilot light at the cabinet.


Will this work? Is it safe? The pump is a 7.5A beast. Would the pilot light explode?
If you are running only LED light indicators, you don't need a switch. Still I would suggest you feed them through a miniature 100 mA fuse - just to be on the safe side.

Second question: NO WAY. There is no series power indicator which can pass 7.5 A. There is no quick way to see if the motor is running or not unless you resort to DIY. Kill-a-watt type power monitor can do the job of course.
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Old 14th August 2017, 19:04   #1615
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
..........
Another Electrical Question.

Down at the end of the garden by the gate is my pit and submersible water-clearance pump. The pump has a float switch. It is wired back to an RCCB at the same cabinet. I thought it would be nice to know when this pump is on. So... I could wire a pilot light at the cabinet.

I thought to put it on the neutral side, in series with the pump. There then should be no voltage unless the pump is on.

Attachment 1666324

Will this work? Is it safe? The pump is a 7.5A beast. Would the pilot light explode?
Having a bulb in series will not do, as full current is in the path, and will blow the light.

Instead use a small pilot light between the phase and neutral, after the RCCB.

Last edited by Aroy : 14th August 2017 at 19:05.
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Old 15th August 2017, 03:18   #1616
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Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
If you are running only LED light indicators, you don't need a switch. Still I would suggest you feed them through a miniature 100 mA fuse - just to be on the safe side.
Thank you! I noticed very similar lights behind the check out at a local shop today. Also mounted in wood panel. They looked good.

Quote:
Second question: NO WAY. There is no series power indicator which can pass 7.5 A. There is no quick way to see if the motor is running or not unless you resort to DIY. Kill-a-watt type power monitor can do the job of course.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
Having a bulb in series will not do, as full current is in the path, and will blow the light.
Great. That's what friends are for: saving me from explosions I'll google kill-a-watt*.
Quote:
Instead use a small pilot light between the phase and neutral, after the RCCB.
The RCCB is always on. So a pilot light placed here would be always on, wouldn't it?

The pump does a great job of looking after itself. It would be nice if it had a longer duty cycle: in very heavy rain, it does about 60 seconds on and 40 seconds off. I don't think I can adjust the float length much. And the motor section must be submerged for cooling. When it is not raining, it probably runs once or twice a day to get rid of the house grey water.

At least... we know we can cope with rainfall rate of double "very heavy" without buildup of water on the drive/garden. A big improvement on the past. Very heavy? A local weather enthusiast measured a rainfall rate of over 90mm/hr the other day



*I just need an indication of on/off to show me when the pump is running. Is there some simple inductive thingy that would power a pilot light?
Like this maybe

Last edited by Thad E Ginathom : 15th August 2017 at 03:48.
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Old 15th August 2017, 11:21   #1617
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
.........

The RCCB is always on. So a pilot light placed here would be always on, wouldn't it?

.......
I guess yes. Then the only recourse is to have an AC ammeter in series with the phase. That will only show the current when the pump is on.
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http://www.ebay.in/itm/122570896167?aff_source=Sok-Goog

In fact if you have 3-phase supply and want to go overboard, you can have a board with 3 Ammeters and 3 Voltmeters. That will give you enough data on supply and consumption to keep you happy.

Last edited by Aroy : 15th August 2017 at 11:23.
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Old 15th August 2017, 13:50   #1618
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*I just need an indication of on/off to show me when the pump is running. Is there some simple inductive thingy that would power a pilot light?
I think while you are at it you should probably automate something to send you an email or sms when it is switched on and off. My nephew just became the channel partner for PI in India and am looking at projects where I can use those. I currently use remote sockets sourced from Maplin in the UK to switch off my TV, STB, Amp, Media Player and use a wifi MI power strip to take power off my dual external hard drives connected to my NAS. All this to save some power in standby mode and also laziness. However the Maplin thingys are not reliable and one fall of the remote and it usually stops working. Have been googling the PI for automation and will probably do it in the next couple of weeks.
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Old 15th August 2017, 18:30   #1619
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I think while you are at it you should probably automate something to send you an email or sms when it is switched on and off. ...


Once every 1.5 minutes when it rains!

You know, if I had ever done any work with even simple development in Android, I might actually be tempted to put the pilot light on my phone! But no.

The amp meter is a nice idea. The inductive thingy would be good, but I don't think I can get it in India.

The problem with three-phase total monitoring would be taking heavy cable to panel-mounted meters on a movable door. My dangerometer doesn't like that idea. Not at all!
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Old 15th August 2017, 19:56   #1620
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You could buy an AC ammeter with a big digital readout that you can read from some distance. That should be good enough for most situations unless you are very far away from the box and only a light can be used to ascertain whether the device is switched on.
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