Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff > DIY - Do it yourself


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th April 2018, 20:22   #1831
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: India
Posts: 9,530
Thanked: 13,897 Times
Infractions: 0/1 (5)
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by R2D2 View Post
Pics of the tools etc to follow soon
Awaiting these details Sir.

Can you please list out the tools that you plan to use for the brake job?!
a4anurag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2018, 20:37   #1832
Senior - BHPian
 
R2D2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Punya Nagari
Posts: 2,105
Thanked: 1,532 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by a4anurag View Post
Awaiting these details Sir. Can you please list out the tools that you plan to use for the brake job?!
Ok here's a list of the things I'll be using:

1) 21 piece caliper push back tool. This is a must for the rear caliper piston as it needs to be turned and pushed back into the caliper..both simultaneously. The front calipers can be pushed back with a clamp or the special tool which ever works better. I bet the special tool does a better job

2) 6" and 9" jaw Taparia C clamp, just in case

3) 13/14 mm open ended spanners or box wrenches

4) Permatex copper anti seize compound

5) Permatex ceramic brake lube

6) 50 ml syringe to remove excess brake fluid from MC reservoir

7) 5/16" (8 mm) clear plastic hose for the bleeder kit (if required)

8) 700 ml plastic cold drink bottle for bleeding, cleaned and air dried.

9) 1 litre Bosch (or Toyota) DOT 3 brake fluid. I do not mix DOT 4 and DOT 3 though they are miscible. They have different boiling pt. characteristics. Upgrading to DOT 4 would necessitate a full flush, difficult without the special service tool (SST). Don't mess with the ABS is what I say. It is VERY expensive to replace and changing this part isn't really a DIY without that SST.

10) 2 x torque wrenches, for the caliper pin and carrier bolts, 2nd wrench for the wheel nuts. Torquing to correct specs is important if you don't want warped rotors or parts coming loose.

11) Box/socket wrench set

12) STP brake cleaner

13) Plenty of rags

14) F & R brake pads (details in earlier post)

15) F & R brake rotors (details in earlier post), given the price of aftermarket OEM quality parts I'd say replace the rotors don't resurface them.

16) Pliers

17) Loctite thread locker fluid (if required)

18) Wood block or similar to place under the brake pedal if we choose to bleed the brakes. When bleeding the system do not depress the brake all the way to the floor, the MC cylinder piston travels only a fraction of the total cylinder bore in normal use, depressing it beyond its standard travel distance may cause the seals to get damaged. This is primarily for old cars, a brand new MC will not have this issue.

19) Zip ties or old hangers to support the caliper when changing the rotors and pads. Never hang it by the brake hose.

I will try and take pics but since this is a DIY (except where my back protests) I may have greasy/dirty hands that preclude handling my mobile phone.

Last edited by R2D2 : 18th April 2018 at 20:58. Reason: typos and additions
R2D2 is online now   (3) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 22nd April 2018, 10:26   #1833
NH7
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Hyderabad/ BLR
Posts: 33
Thanked: 49 Times
Default

Very comprehensive kit and knowledge for the job, I must say. Good on you R2D2.
Are brake pad wear sensors not fitted?? You may want check first, and save yourself a repeat job. A rubber mallet, some WD40 and sandpaper/ power brush would also be required to remove the old rotors, and prep the hub, no?
Extra caution when doing the rear, parking brake is out consideration, so please stay safe and ensure you have multiple jacks/ pedestal stands and chocks. I had a near miss on this one, for my stupidity.
Please feedback on the permatex high temperature anti seize, I have only used copaslip in the past, and would appreciate more info.
NH7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd April 2018, 10:55   #1834
Senior - BHPian
 
R2D2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Punya Nagari
Posts: 2,105
Thanked: 1,532 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by NH7 View Post
Very comprehensive kit and knowledge for the job, I must say. Good on you R2D2.
Thanks NH7

Quote:
Are brake pad wear sensors not fitted?? You may want check first, and save yourself a repeat job. A rubber mallet, some WD40 and sandpaper/ power brush would also be required to remove the old rotors, and prep the hub, no?
Few things I missed listing in the earlier post:

a) Metal wire brushes, small and medium size to remove rust if any from the hubs.
b) Some emery paper for the same purpose.
c) 6 mm ID clear plastic pipe/hose in addition to the 8 mm one listed below. I am not sure what size the bleeder nipples are hence the 2 sizes. I think one of them should definitely fit.

Quote:
Extra caution when doing the rear, parking brake is out consideration, so please stay safe and ensure you have multiple jacks/ pedestal stands and chocks. I had a near miss on this one, for my stupidity.
The car will be lifted on a 4 point electrically operated hoist the kind you find in service centres and garages for e.g here: my car on a hoist at Toyota's Hubli KA dealership

There's no way I'd attempt this without ensuring safety. Thanks for sharing your experience. Carelessness can result in serious injury or death. You don't stand a chance if a vehicle comes down on you from even 6-12" above the ground.

Jack stands are my 2nd choice but I didn't buy them since I know this FNG who has a car hoist which when operated properly (I stress on the words "when operated properly") is the safest and most flexible since one can raise/lower height as per requirement.

Quote:
Please feedback on the permatex high temperature anti seize, I have only used copaslip in the past, and would appreciate more info.
This is some of the best lube you can buy. Permatex products (ceramic and copper) are well known but I will be using the ceramic grease only if necessary on the slide pins.

Toyota does not recommend using any lubricant on the brake pad hardware (clips) or on the back side of pads for this particular model.

Other products to consider are Sil Glyde and 3M silicone grease. Some car owners prefer these 2 products over Permatex. I also have the 3M product on order.

Last edited by R2D2 : 22nd April 2018 at 11:06. Reason: additions
R2D2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bangalore : Fantastic store for tools kartikkumar Shifting gears 22 27th September 2012 01:15
Amplifier Installation Help: For DIYer nitin.dangayach In-Car Entertainment 52 10th March 2010 18:59
Power tools dadu Gadgets, Computers & Software 15 16th June 2008 12:05
tools for bike garage bullboy Motorbikes 1 11th September 2006 12:50


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 17:41.

Copyright 2000 - 2018, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks