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Old 20th October 2010, 14:43   #331
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Originally Posted by low_bass_makker View Post
Which are better cordless power tool...

18 volts or 32 volts system. I know that higher the voltage lower the current but does going for a 32 volts has it benefits ???
I guesss, more voltage is more torque. So look at the figures and your requirement.
For a DIY use, I would see, what's the price difference between 18V and 32V units. If difference is close to spare battery pack of 18V unit, I would buy the 18V one along with spare battery pack.

I use a 7.2 Volts small unit (bought at Target store in US) and I find it does most of the job for me well. SO 18Volts must be quite powerful in itself.
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Old 25th October 2010, 22:27   #332
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Someone in the thread mentioned advocating us to buy quality tools. I agree with this. Last weekend I was on some carpentry work and my jigsaw broke. the wheel which drives the saw slipped. Ended up spending more time on fixing it than my actual DIY. It is frustrating when the tool breaks in the midst of a work you see.

Here are few pics I took when it was opened for repair. Thought, some might be interested to see 'what's inside'. LoL. I do always.

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Tools for a DIYer-jig_saw_open_large.jpg

I could fix it finally and worked fine!

I got this through one of my uncles and not sure, if this is really a "branded" one or just a knock-off item.
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Old 26th October 2010, 03:45   #333
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Originally Posted by shyamhegde View Post
Someone in the thread mentioned advocating us to buy quality tools. I agree with this. Last weekend I was on some carpentry work and my jigsaw broke. the wheel which drives the saw slipped. Ended up spending more time on fixing it than my actual DIY. It is frustrating when the tool breaks in the midst of a work you see.

Here are few pics I took when it was opened for repair. Thought, some might be interested to see 'what's inside'. LoL. I do always.

I could fix it finally and worked fine!

I got this through one of my uncles and not sure, if this is really a "branded" one or just a knock-off item.
shyam, you seem to be having lots of such D.I.Y. Tools,

any idea if these are available in India, any approx cost ?
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Old 26th October 2010, 13:15   #334
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Sure, they have been pretty much commonly available from a long time (much before the China-made marble/stone cutting machines came in). Bosch, B&D, even China-made ones. 2-3K.
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Old 28th October 2010, 19:46   #335
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Any pointers on drilling on tiles? I need to put some screws on the bathroom tiles to install a shelf.
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Old 28th October 2010, 19:55   #336
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Any pointers on drilling on tiles? I need to put some screws on the bathroom tiles to install a shelf.
Use your regular concrete driller, but ensure that you don't have the hammering effect as you would turn on when drilling on walls. If you've a driller for wood, you can use that, but again, without the hammering effect.

If you need to drill a large hold & remain cautious, then start with smallest drill bit & redo the task with medium bit followed by large bit.

Last edited by aargee : 28th October 2010 at 19:57.
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Old 29th October 2010, 00:17   #337
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Use your regular concrete driller, but ensure that you don't have the hammering effect as you would turn on when drilling on walls. If you've a driller for wood, you can use that, but again, without the hammering effect.

If you need to drill a large hold & remain cautious, then start with smallest drill bit & redo the task with medium bit followed by large bit.
Thanks aargee, I like your suggestion of starting with a smaller size. I have all the drill bits. This is the kit that I have http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/2077472-post303.html (The pic AWD has posted is actually the pic of my kit that I had posted earlier )
What I was asking is for any specific do's and dont's for tiles.
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Old 29th October 2010, 10:51   #338
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Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
Thanks aargee, I like your suggestion of starting with a smaller size. I have all the drill bits. This is the kit that I have http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/2077472-post303.html (The pic AWD has posted is actually the pic of my kit that I had posted earlier )
What I was asking is for any specific do's and dont's for tiles.

For tiles, I try to position stuffs in such way that holes can be drilled at the joining points, mostly the white-cement part, avoiding drilling in the middle of a tile.
For some reason, i found, it is better to use a (new) HSS bit to start, for initial few mm of the tile. Do not change the angle midway , tile may chip off a bit around. do not put too much of pressure, let the 'rpm' help cutting thru the tile.
HSS bit becomes useless very soon. Once the initial surface is crossed, I find it easy and safe to use the regular bit used for concretes.

And you got a nice tool-kit there
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Old 29th October 2010, 12:56   #339
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Originally Posted by shyamhegde View Post
For tiles, I try to position stuffs in such way that holes can be drilled at the joining points, mostly the white-cement part, avoiding drilling in the middle of a tile.
This is true, but practically speaking it may not be possible; like when I fixed a mirror, I'd to fix it to the centre of wash basin, however there were no joints at the centre. So I used the small bit to increasing size trick to get it done.


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Do not change the angle midway , tile may chip off a bit around. do not put too much of pressure, let the 'rpm' help cutting thru the tile.
Boy!!! why would one want to change angle in between? I'm under the impression that one either starts straight & finishes straight or starts slanted & ends slanted. But again, with walls & wood, its possible to change the angle, but over the years I found, its better to plan first (slanted/straight) & then carry on. That way the drill bit also remains safe.

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Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
What I was asking is for any specific do's and dont's for tiles.
Just start with smallest drill bit & keep increasing the dia. Unless you've a bad quality of tile, nothing is bound to even chip off.
Here's my little collection...
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/1976916-post.html
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/1801032-post.html
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/1796695-post.html
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Old 29th October 2010, 13:07   #340
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Originally Posted by aargee View Post
Boy!!! why would one want to change angle in between? I'm under the impression that one either starts straight & finishes straight or starts slanted & ends slanted. But again, with walls & wood, its possible to change the angle, but over the years I found, its better to plan first (slanted/straight) & then carry on. That way the drill bit also remains safe.
You see, I do these as a part time/DIY at home. Just try them, not yet very good at it I guess.
So, i did find it tricky to hold the drill machine in the same angle sometimes due to space constraint angle (corners, under the wash basin etc. etc.) and swerve the angle a bit (mistake, i knew). One such occasion, i found a piece of tiles surface chipping off.
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Old 29th October 2010, 13:53   #341
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You see, I do these as a part time/DIY at home. Just try them, not yet very good at it I guess.
So are we too ; the way it worked out for me was, either I do it or it doesn't get done (again thanks to non committed ppl such as plumbers, carpenters, electricians) right from the age of 14!!! I was forced to learn & mend things on my own.

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Originally Posted by shyamhegde View Post
So, i did find it tricky to hold the drill machine in the same angle sometimes due to space constraint angle (corners, under the wash basin etc. etc.) and swerve the angle a bit (mistake, i knew). One such occasion, i found a piece of tiles surface chipping off.
I used to work from the days of wall puncher (not sure if this is the right term to use, if DelAlte sir or Thad sir reads this, they're going to lol) where in I was breaking one for every use. Later I realized my mistake of hammering them in a slanting position. Once I learned very well, I bought the GSB10 as well as the Black & Decker; it not only made my life easy, but my previous experience with puncher helped me how to use them.
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Old 29th October 2010, 16:04   #342
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"Wall puncher" --- you mean the thing you hammer into the wall to make a hole?

Yes... I think I have one of those. Not nearly so neat, not nearly so fast, as using an electric drill, but still works! Probably more compatible with the stick-a-lump-of-wood in the hole method of fixing rather than the plastic plug, which should be a good fit in a nice round hole, but are the plastic plugs available here anyway? I have a supply, in two sizes, from London
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Old 29th October 2010, 16:15   #343
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but are the plastic plugs available here anyway? I have a supply, in two sizes, from London
Yes, I have seen them in couple of super-markets, in hardware sections.
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Old 29th October 2010, 16:36   #344
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
"Wall puncher" --- you mean the thing you hammer into the wall to make a hole?
Exactly

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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Yes... I think I have one of those. Not nearly so neat, not nearly so fast, as using an electric drill, but still works!
True

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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Probably more compatible with the stick-a-lump-of-wood in the hole method of fixing rather than the plastic plug, which should be a good fit in a nice round hole, but are the plastic plugs available here anyway? I have a supply, in two sizes, from London
Yes sir; can you believe that Bosch makes those plastic plugs & I have them . I also have local makes too; needless to say, Bosch has a better quality than the local ones. But the local ones are way to better to do the job too. You WILL get it at any local hardware store in Adyar; let me know if you can't find & I can courier them to you.
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Old 29th October 2010, 17:11   #345
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The "wall puncher" (masonry punch) is for some strange reason called a "jumper" in Bangalore - maybe because it has the tendency of jumping around when hit . I used to wonder why electricians would carry a miniature sledge-hammer till I saw them use it with the "jumper" (this was in the days when electrical wiring was laid in wooden conduits exposed on the wall, not concealed plastic or metal conduits).

No, Bosch does not make those plastic plugs - other than the drill they source the whole kit from vendors. And yes, these plugs are so ubiquitous nowadays that no electrician or plumber carries wooden plugs (or teak pieces to make plugs out of).
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