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Old 2nd November 2013, 16:35   #646
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I don't want to drill a hole but grind some metal. ... Do you think dremel is capable of smoothing this (the pipes which are not flush inside the collector) out?
Ah OK, my bad. Well, though the Dremel will do the job ultimately (with it's flex shat and a conical grinder) it will take a rather long time. A conventional flex shaft with a larger bit will grind metal faster. You need more torque than the Dremel can generate.
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Old 2nd November 2013, 21:33   #647
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Stainless steel is very hard to work with. Not only does it start out hard, but it work hardens. Grinders of all sorts are dangerous tools. You must use proper face/eye protection. Don't even think about even a few seconds of work without them. Not even one second. Even with them, you are putting yourself at risk from pieces of shattered grinding too, and you should consider it likely that you will shatter a tool or three. Don't let other people near: keep them out of the room, or out of the entire area.

On top of all the difficulties and precautions that you must take with the tool, you need also a way of securely holding the steel piece.

I'm neither an engineer nor a mechanic. I "worked my way" through a couple of years of being a long-haired hippie with un-/semi-skilled jobs in engineering factories, mostly drilling holes in pieces of metal, and later made jewellery as a hobby. Unless it is not as bad as it looks in the photo, this is not a job I would like to take on: take it to a workshop!

I'm assuming you want to smooth down the entire interior of the pipe. If it is only the excess near the mouth, then I might attack that with a dremel, but would also consider hand tools such as a scraper (engineer's scraper) and a half-round file.
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Old 3rd November 2013, 21:20   #648
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
You need more torque than the Dremel can generate.
Dremel is affordable, bigger die grinders not so at present :( Need to find out if i can rent one for a few days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Stainless steel is very hard to work with. Not only does it start out hard, but it work hardens. Grinders of all sorts are dangerous tools. You must use proper face/eye protection. Don't even think about even a few seconds of work without them. Not even one second. Even with them, you are putting yourself at risk from pieces of shattered grinding too, and you should consider it likely that you will shatter a tool or three. Don't let other people near: keep them out of the room, or out of the entire area.

On top of all the difficulties and precautions that you must take with the tool, you need also a way of securely holding the steel piece.

I'm neither an engineer nor a mechanic. I "worked my way" through a couple of years of being a long-haired hippie with un-/semi-skilled jobs in engineering factories, mostly drilling holes in pieces of metal, and later made jewellery as a hobby. Unless it is not as bad as it looks in the photo, this is not a job I would like to take on: take it to a workshop!

I'm assuming you want to smooth down the entire interior of the pipe. If it is only the excess near the mouth, then I might attack that with a dremel, but would also consider hand tools such as a scraper (engineer's scraper) and a half-round file.
I prefer to take it to a workshop if they would do the job for me, but the workshops i know locally here don't have access to die grinders though they have other bits of drilling and cutting machinery.

I want to smooth the interior of the collector region plus take some metal off the pipe terminating inside the collector thats the difficult part and its worse than it looks in the photo.

I have a 3M safety glass, cost me 100 bucks, its cheap but i hope it works.
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Old 4th November 2013, 16:42   #649
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by Sankar View Post
I don't want to drill a hole but grind some metal. This is the collector of my header and its not very good on the inside. I want to cut out the excess pipe and merge it as smooth as possible. With the limited space available i think only a flex shaft grinder would work. Do you think dremel is capable of smoothing this (the pipes which are not flush inside the collector) out?

Attachment 1161405
What you need is a die grinder

http://www.hitachi-powertools.com.au...ID=380&CatID=4
or this

http://www.indiamart.com/marveltools.../grinders.html
or
http://www.flexibleindustrial.com/FI...ic-Die-Grinder
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Old 5th November 2013, 19:11   #650
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

Any reviews about http://www.mrthomas.in/ ? Are they reliable? They have got some decent deals in power tools which am planning to buy
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Old 5th November 2013, 21:18   #651
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

I checked the specs of extended shaft die grinder i found online for sale in India, Makita and Bosch GGS 27, but i'm not sure it would fit inside the exhaust pipe with enough clearance for moving around. I'll go and check with the local power tools shop.
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Old 7th November 2013, 10:11   #652
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I checked the specs of extended shaft die grinder i found online for sale in India, Makita and Bosch GGS 27, but i'm not sure it would fit inside the exhaust pipe with enough clearance for moving around. I'll go and check with the local power tools shop.
The grinding bits are available in various shapes and sizes, starting from 3mm dia and 5mm long all the way to 50mm+ dia and 100mm long. What you need is a thin long one.
http://www.hobbylinc.com/rotary_powe..._grinding_bits
http://www.proxxontools.com/store/pc...?idCategory=46
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/ecatalog/N-1z0dqdl
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Old 17th November 2013, 18:39   #653
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

Guys, visited Metro yesterday and was surprised to see Bosch GSB450RE being sold for 2399/-, which is much lesser than the offer given for Bosch for their employees. I was looking for 500RE, but the price is slightly higher than the offer given for Bosch employees.
I need this to just do my household chores, so which one should I go for ?
450RE or 500RE
I already have the normal hammer, jumper, pliers, screw drivers. I am looking at this kit just to minimize the load on my hands in hitting the jumper with the hammer.
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Old 18th November 2013, 12:56   #654
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... so which one should I go for ?
450RE or 500RE ...
Not much to differentiate there for your needs. Even the 450RE is good enough for domestic DIY jobs.
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Old 18th November 2013, 13:31   #655
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Originally Posted by dre@ms View Post
Guys, visited Metro yesterday and was surprised to see Bosch GSB450RE being sold for 2399/-, which is much lesser than the offer given for Bosch for their employees. I was looking for 500RE, but the price is slightly higher than the offer given for Bosch employees.
I need this to just do my household chores, so which one should I go for ?
450RE or 500RE
I already have the normal hammer, jumper, pliers, screw drivers. I am looking at this kit just to minimize the load on my hands in hitting the jumper with the hammer.
I have the 600RE. I don't normally use all of the bundled tools as I already have them separate. As DerAlte said the 450 would just do fine. But the 500 have more drill bits, which I fond very useful
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Old 18th November 2013, 18:40   #656
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
Not much to differentiate there for your needs. Even the 450RE is good enough for domestic DIY jobs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaisakhr View Post
I have the 600RE. I don't normally use all of the bundled tools as I already have them separate. As DerAlte said the 450 would just do fine. But the 500 have more drill bits, which I fond very useful
Will all sizes drill bits be useful for general home DIY
I will stick with 450RE, since no other big or tiny holes I need to drill in my house in the near future.
Only hiccup, the price I saw in Metro was for the carton box variant of 450RE. So need to check if the suitcase variant is available or not.
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Old 18th November 2013, 19:04   #657
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Will all sizes drill bits be useful for general home DIY
I will stick with 450RE, since no other big or tiny holes I need to drill in my house in the near future.
Only hiccup, the price I saw in Metro was for the carton box variant of 450RE. So need to check if the suitcase variant is available or not.
They have the kit version (suitcase) also. I have seen it in Metro C&C in Bangalore.

The most common masonry bits used are 6, 8 and 10mm when you use plastic inserts for screws, or use anchor bolts. If you are making starter holes for screws in wood (saves a lot of effort in driving screws in manually), you can sharpen a medium nail (cut off the head) into an arrow shape and use that.
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Old 18th November 2013, 23:29   #658
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If you are making starter holes for screws in wood (saves a lot of effort in driving screws in manually)
If? Screws are meant to have holes drilled for them, even in wood.
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Old 19th November 2013, 07:58   #659
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They have the kit version (suitcase) also. I have seen it in Metro C&C in Bangalore.
Even I was looking in the same shop. They have a seperate section only for these items. Have seen B&D, Skil and Bosch drillers and drill bits. In another section, the pressure washers again from B&D, Karcher, Bosch.

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If? Screws are meant to have holes drilled for them, even in wood.
Agree, but we need to make a small hole to keep the screws in place and then screw them.
Does the 450RE, help me in screwing and unscrewing too? Does it have the hammer action?
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Old 19th November 2013, 08:28   #660
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If? Screws are meant to have holes drilled for them, even in wood.
The modern self-tapping screws, with a tapered body and deep sharp threads, don't need a starter hole. Just a punch is sufficient to start. Works well with MDF and soft woods. Driving these screws in hard wood just needs a bit more torque. All modern cabinet making with the German / Italian hinges uses these for better productivity.

Yes, with older screws with cylindrical shafts one should use a starter hole to reduce torque and avoid splitting.
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