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Old 11th December 2013, 18:19   #676
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
If there is no heatsink, it is not necessary it will overheat and die at low speed. The "triac" doesn't dissipate heat inversely proportional to speed. The "triac" doesn't help the motor go slow, it modulates the speed by allowing a fraction of a sine wave to pass through. It doesn't dissipate the rest of the sine wave as heat - it is just like a switch opening and closing at the correct time.

The heating you notice in the air coming out of the drill is the dissipation of heat from the motor coils, not the "triac". As long as you are not getting that faint burning smell (that comes when a new drill / motor heats - it is the insulation varnish evaporating), everything should be fine. Don't bother about the hot air, it is meant to be like that.
@DerAlte. I know all that as I am an Engineer who, once earned my livelihood mending electronics for almost a decade, before I switched to Computers. I used simplification when explaining the role of a triac for others to follow the idea. Whilst at it, in this case, it all depends on how the triac is driven. When universal motor speeds are controlled by the triac, sometimes they do heat up if the waveform is not a pure sinewave.

I didn't say that the hot air coming out of the drill is from the triac when the motor is driven to its 'limits'. I just pointed out the possibilities of a failure when things are overloaded.

I am sorry DerAlte if I sound like arguing. I just wanted to set the record straight.
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Old 1st January 2014, 01:28   #677
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Guys. Im planning to do a full wheel /brake service on my car. I want to take apart the calipers and pads and lubricate the sliding pins etc. etc. Now I've read somewhere that brake callipers' sliding pins use silicon based lubricant from the factory. Can someone post a link to such a thing in the Indian market?
I also want to buy sockets for such a job. What ratchet/sockets /accessories are needed to work in the wheel well and on brakes etc.?
To do a full brake service on Indigo, you will need
1.#12 socket or ring spanner
2.#10 ring spanner (to open and close bleed valve)
3.#8 ring spanner (to open and close bleed valve of rear drum brakes)

Silicone grease (translucent)or Brake grease "Red grease" as it is known by spare parts shop, made by TVS giriling.
A word of caution-Never use all-purpose grease as it tends to eat away the rubber boots and also, it cannot withstand the heat produced by brakes.

Put the car on jack stands, remove the wheels , turn the steering to the side which you are working, on the lower backside of the caliper there is a 12mm bolt that needs to be removed. Once it is removed- just slide the caliper and brake pads should be accessible now.
Check out this video, skip to 2:45 mark.


An important note- Before taking out the car for a test drive, pump the brake pedal a few times.
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Old 3rd January 2014, 18:25   #678
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

Bosch has offered a new year offer on its power tool products to its employees. Details are as under.

Tools for a DIYer-image001.jpg
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Old 17th January 2014, 20:34   #679
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

I was keen to buy a Circular Saw, spoke to a few professionals, they were using a Marble Tile cutter with Wood blade. Wanted to know whether its safe enough to use Wood cutting blade on a marble cutter ?

Another known fellow was using an Angle grinder with a Wood blade. I found it too risky to use.

Also can a steel cutting blade be used on a Circular saw ?

Then saw Dremel tools, there's a vast range. Wonder which tool would be right for cutting wood, steel & maybe marble, etc... I don't require a tool for carving, designs, etc. Also can a car polishing accessory be used on a Dremel multi tool like Dremel 4000/65 ?
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Old 17th January 2014, 22:07   #680
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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I was keen to buy a Circular Saw, spoke to a few professionals, they were using a Marble Tile cutter with Wood blade. Wanted to know whether its safe enough to use Wood cutting blade on a marble cutter ?

Another known fellow was using an Angle grinder with a Wood blade. I found it too risky to use.

Also can a steel cutting blade be used on a Circular saw ?

Then saw Dremel tools, there's a vast range. Wonder which tool would be right for cutting wood, steel & maybe marble, etc... I don't require a tool for carving, designs, etc. Also can a car polishing accessory be used on a Dremel multi tool like Dremel 4000/65 ?
I've use a marble tile cutter (with a steel cutting blade)for cutting metal, works fine, and feels safer than using a similar blade on an angle grinder. Depends on the thickness of the wood, the blade for the marble tile cutter will be more than inch smaller than on a normal circular saw.

I agree, I feel like using an angle grinder for cutting is too risky, but works for hard to reach spots.

I have a dremel 4000/65 and i found it amazing, but each accessory has a specific use, you will have to order an extra blade suitable for cutting wood and i highly doubt there is one in that kit. the dremel has buffing wheels of its own, a few come in that kit. note that on the Dremel site it specifies what accesory can be used for what material.
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Old 17th January 2014, 22:39   #681
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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I've use a marble tile cutter (with a steel cutting blade)for cutting metal, works fine, and feels safer. Depends on the thickness of the wood, the blade for the marble tile cutter will be more than inch smaller than on a normal circular saw.

I have a dremel 4000/65 and i found it amazing, but each accessory has a specific use, you will have to order an extra blade suitable for cutting wood dremel has buffing wheels of its own.
Ok so Marble tile cutter cuts across metal with proper blade but can it cut the word as good too ? Im a bit concerned on the wood part because wood cutting blades have teeth which can break away & that can be risky. This can be due to the fact that there's not much protection in the form of a cover over the blade.

If Marble cutter can cut through wood with ease & safety, I could buy one because marble cutters come around half the price of dedicated circular saws. Yes they have smaller blades than circular saws but I won't mind that because I'll be using for DIY jobs at home & not professionally.

Tell me more about Dremel 4000, I was narrowing on it. Yes if there are accessories to cut through wood & steel, I would get them. But would it cut through wood, metal & marble tiles properly & upto what depth ?

Also there are a couple of other models by Dremel like; Dremel Saw Max & Dremel Trio. Wonder which of 4000 or Saw Max or Trio would suit my needs best!

& does 4000 have an accessory which could be used for polishing cars ?
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Old 17th January 2014, 23:24   #682
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Im a bit concerned on the wood part because wood cutting blades have teeth which can break away & that can be risky. This can be due to the fact that there's not much protection in the form of a cover over the blade.

If Marble cutter can cut through wood with ease & safety, I could buy one because marble cutters come around half the price of dedicated circular saws. Yes they have smaller blades than circular saws but I won't mind that because I'll be using for DIY jobs at home & not professionally.

Tell me more about Dremel 4000, I was narrowing on it. Yes if there are accessories to cut through wood & steel, I would get them. But would it cut through wood, metal & marble tiles properly & upto what depth ?

Also there are a couple of other models by Dremel like; Dremel Saw Max & Dremel Trio. Wonder which of 4000 or Saw Max or Trio would suit my needs best!

& does 4000 have an accessory which could be used for polishing cars ?
I've cut plenty of metal for college projects with the marble cutter, never been injured from broken blades apart from when not using safety goggles. Always use safety goggles! Have learnt that the hard way.
I have never used a wooden cutting disk on a marble tile cutter but if it works for others without a problem, I wouldn't worry.

The dremel kit is amazing! The flexible shaft is really helpful. I have bought a few polishing stones and cutting disks, when buying the disks, buy the harder, thicker one, lasts longer.
I think the buffing tool will work for you, it worked when I polished brass, was really good, gets all the details, but didnt Last too long. The dremel is more of a detailing tool, good for small jobs. Check out the video's before buying, makes the decision on which kits to buy easier. But I'd never try polishing a whole car with it, the buffing tool is puny, would take days to cover the car.
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Old 17th January 2014, 23:51   #683
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

I strongly suggest people use the right tool for the job, and do not try to find some magic compromise that will do everything. Wood, metals, concrete, stone: all are different materials with different hardnesses, textures, natures, and reaction to tools. Use the right tool!
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Old 18th January 2014, 11:29   #684
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

There are basic differences in cutting blades
1. Wood. These have coarser pitch and the teeth are angled outwards - a provision for extracting the saw dust, which would otherwise jam the blade. For longer lasting blades, the teeth are carbide tipped.

2. Stone. These blades are normally diamond/carbide coated disks and are used with water to cool the blade and extract the dust. If you use them dry, the blade will over heat and spoil. For marble and other soft stones the carbide blade is fine, while for harder stones diamond is the only solution.

3. Steel. The blades are made of special "High Speed" steel with sufficient hardness. The tooth pitch is small. For longer lasting blades the teeth are carbide tipped. You can also use blades of carborundum. These have composition of grinding stone, just thinner.

It is advisable to use blades made for the material, else they may over heat, not cut (and become blunt fast) or simply break. In Delhi the blades for hand held saws, used by contractors for marble and wood are about Rs.80 each. Carborundum blades for steel are more expensive as they have a larger diameter. Blades for table saws are much more expensive as they are larger and meant for heavy duty work.
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Old 18th January 2014, 21:04   #685
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by Dee_aRe_Cee View Post
I've cut plenty of metal for college projects with the marble cutter
The dremel kit is amazing!
I think the buffing tool will work for you, But I'd never try polishing a whole car with it, the buffing tool is puny, would take days to cover the car.
Metal cutting blades are discs, so breakage & risk is minimal. While due to teeth on Wood cutting blades, risk of breakaway fliers is high.

Yes saw the accessories for Dremel 4000, rightly said the buffing tool won't be helpful doing a car!

I have an option of buying separate dedicated tools also, like circular saw for wood, marble/tile cutter for metal, etc.. But thought an all-in-one tool would be cool, like Dremel 4000 or Saw Max, etc.

There's a jigsaw model available too but Im not sure who would it fare!
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Old 18th January 2014, 22:26   #686
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

If you are only going to do miniature stuff, Dremel plus accessories will probably do fine. Do not expect it to take on bigger tasks, though.

The cutting wheels, depending on type, can be very fragile indeed. I've broken a few. Eye, if not full-face, protection is absolutely essential.


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Old 18th January 2014, 23:55   #687
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
If you are only going to do miniature stuff, Dremel plus accessories will probably do fine. Do not expect it to take on bigger tasks, though.

The cutting wheels, depending on type, can be very fragile indeed. I've broken a few. Eye, if not full-face, protection [i]is absolutely essential.
I won't be doing sculpting or fine arts but using for repairs or new woodwork, Aluminium, some metal, etc...that is usual works at home.

I feel this one here should be safe for usage: Only Wood application:
http://www.bosch-professional.com/gb...0-23333-ocs-p/

Multi-usage:
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/tools/pa...0#.UtrGdRC6bIU

Then enters this one:
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/tools/Pa...0#.UtrG1xC6bIU

Another one:
https://www.dremel.com/en-us/tools/P....aspx?pid=6800

& hence the confusion!
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Old 21st January 2014, 12:31   #688
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by AWD View Post
I won't be doing sculpting or fine arts but using for repairs or new woodwork, Aluminium, some metal, etc...that is usual works at home.

I feel this one here should be safe for usage: Only Wood application:
http://www.bosch-professional.com/gb...0-23333-ocs-p/ ...
A "one gizmo does all" tool is never as efficient as a conventional tool for any job. You will need more than one tool. Conventional small Dremels can only cut 1/4" wood, and it will huff and puff at that.

Yes, a conventional circular saw is the right choice for long cuts in wood, ply and MDF. But, this is not suitable for metal cutting.

For that you will need a jig-saw with metal cutting blade. With a wood-cutting blade, one can cut short straight cuts and curves / holes. In longer lengths
a. it is difficult to control a straight cut, unless one uses a guide
b. a circular saw cuts faster in straight cuts

Quote:
Originally Posted by AWD View Post
These are US models - 120V. Also, you won't find conventional wood blades for these size in India.

If you have access to Metro Cash & Carry, or are able to visit a Bosch DIY store, you will able to see a wide range of tools and brands. Apart from Bosch, there is Skil, Black & Decker and a couple of other brands such as Einhell and Red Elephant. A cheap China-made circular saw costs about 1600-2000, and is usually the tool of choice of local stone / tile cutters and
carpenters (who use the same diamond-edged stone cutting blade for cutting wood ).
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Old 21st January 2014, 13:08   #689
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
a conventional circular saw is the right choice for long cuts in wood, ply and MDF. But, this is not suitable for metal cutting.

For that you will need a jig-saw with metal cutting blade. With a wood-cutting blade, one can cut short straight cuts and curves / holes. In longer lengths
a. it is difficult to control a straight cut, unless one uses a guide
b. a circular saw cuts faster in straight cuts

These are US models - 120V. Also, you won't find conventional wood blades for these size in India.

If you have access to Metro Cash & Carry, or are able to visit a Bosch DIY store, you will able to see a wide range of tools and brands. Apart from Bosch, there is Skil, Black & Decker and a couple of other brands such as Einhell and Red Elephant. A cheap China-made circular saw costs about 1600-2000, and is usually the tool of choice of local stone / tile cutters and
carpenters (who use the same diamond-edged stone cutting blade for cutting wood ).
Saw a circular saw: Bosch GKS 190, found it a little too big for DIY jobs at home & somewhat expensive too for a single job.

Yes saw a couple of jigsaw models too, Black & decker, Skil, Bosch. Thing is I haven't used a jigsaw in the past & not have seen anyone using, so can't really think how useful it is going to be for my DIY stuff.

Those Dremel models are available in India with 220V input. With Saw Max I guess wood blade should be included in the accessories kit. Also the Dremel4000/65 has quite a few accessories in the kit, hope they include a wood blade too. For metal usage, I've seen a few videos & it seems to do an ok job but did not come across videos showing wood work by Dremel 4000/65. I think its more of a detailing tool or a carving aid.

There is a Metro C&C in town but this one is not stocking power tools, some hand-tools only. Sadly no Bosch DIY store in Town.

Yes those Chinese saws are very popular with local carpenters, masons, plumbers, etc. More than that the Marble cutters are their favorite tool. Its because apart from doing Marble/Tiles, they use a wood blade on it. Even local Tools dealer was suggesting me to buy a marble cutter instead of a circular saw. He said it can also be used to cut walls for electric pipe fittings, etc. My only concern is that how safe is a marble cutter when used with Wood blade.

Correct do it all tools are not the best for each purpose but I don't require the best for small DIY jobs at home. For professionals surely this theory must apply but they too are using multi-tools these days for the ease of carrying, costs, etc...
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Old 21st January 2014, 14:24   #690
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Saw a circular saw: Bosch GKS 190, found it a little too big for DIY jobs at home & somewhat expensive too for a single job. ...
No, it is not too big if you do more than an occasional repair. If you are a wood-working hobbyist, there is no substitute - saves you the grunt work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AWD View Post
... can't really think how useful it is going to be for my DIY stuff. ...
Absolutely invaluable if you need to cut pipes, rods, plastic, wood, plywood (especially in irregular shapes and round holes) etc. Again, saves you the grunt work.

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Originally Posted by AWD View Post
... With Saw Max I guess wood blade should be included in the accessories kit. ...
According to their website, there isn't any. That is because without a guide it will be difficult to get straight cuts which are absolutely essential in wood. This is primarily a metal preparation tool for industries and professionals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AWD View Post
... Also the Dremel4000/65 has quite a few accessories in the kit, hope they include a wood blade too. For metal usage, I've seen a few videos & it seems to do an ok job but did not come across videos showing wood work by Dremel 4000/65. ...
The light-duty 4000 can at most do drilling (there are bits in the kit) and routing / edge forming (one has to buy separately). This is not a cutting tool.

The Dremel Trio is a better muti-purpose tool than the 4000. It works like a jig-saw, router and sander, probably a drill also at a pinch. Good enough for small home jobs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AWD View Post
... Its because apart from doing Marble/Tiles, they use a wood blade on it. Even local Tools dealer was suggesting me to buy a marble cutter instead of a circular saw. He said it can also be used to cut walls for electric pipe fittings, etc. My only concern is that how safe is a marble cutter when used with Wood blade. ...
LOL noooo the carpenters use it with the diamond stone cutting wheel since it cuts faster. And then those poor souls will spend even more time planing the rough (and most times, burnt) cut in the wood, instead of using a wood blade and cutting slowly without jamming or burning.

Conventional circular saws for wood operate at a lower RPM, and take blades of dia 5-1/2"-10", with 7-1/4" being the most common. The common small marble/masonry cutting saws use 4" blades, which is a very rare size in the wood-cutting world. If you can find the blades for wood, it is a good tool to have - a smaller circular saw. Or otherwise use the diamond blade but cut slowly to avoid burning. Can't mount a 5-1/2" or larger wood blade, since the torque needed will burn that small motor.
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