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Old 15th July 2014, 16:24   #751
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by dre@ms View Post
The water tap in my balcony has broken. The screw end is still intact in the wall.
Has it left behind the hexagonal end or is it only the threaded part that remains?

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If the hex. end is still intact, use a pipe wrench to rotate the remaining part of the faucet.

Else, I suppose you will have to insert another pipe (or a similar object) of a smaller diameter inside the threading and try rotating it. You could try applying some WD40 on the threaded portion.
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Old 15th July 2014, 18:20   #752
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

If you have access to a "Bolt Extractor" of relevant size, use it. Else your options are limited. Most probably the tap broke because the rear thread has rusted and jammed inside. Call a plumber who has inner thread "tap set". He will literally cut a new thread with the "tap"



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Old 16th July 2014, 12:10   #753
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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If you can still get hold of it you can probably unscrew it with a larger plier. If it does not open with that you can also look at cutting it with a dremel along its length. That way it should get weak and then you can remove it with pliers by bending it. But the best method would be to unscrew it.
No. The screw part is not protruding out. I was thinking of the same idea to cut it length wise. Need to source a dremel then.

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Has it left behind the hexagonal end or is it only the threaded part that remains?
If the hex. end is still intact, use a pipe wrench to rotate the remaining part of the faucet. .
No, the hexagonal end is with the tap.

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Originally Posted by Gannu_1 View Post
Else, I suppose you will have to insert another pipe (or a similar object) of a smaller diameter inside the threading and try rotating it. You could try applying some WD40 on the threaded portion.
I will give this a try.

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Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
If you have access to a "Bolt Extractor" of relevant size, use it. Else your options are limited. Most probably the tap broke because the rear thread has rusted and jammed inside. Call a plumber who has inner thread "tap set". He will literally cut a new thread with the "tap"
I don't have a Bolt Extractor. If the above 2 ideas didn't work, will call the plumber and seek his help.
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Old 16th July 2014, 12:39   #754
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

Hi Guys,

There is a good Online Power Tools website, which is offering good deals on several products. Just thought of sharing, in case people are interested:
http://www.mrthomas.in/best-deals

Regards,
Behemoth
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Old 16th July 2014, 14:38   #755
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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No. The screw part is not protruding out. I was thinking of the same idea to cut it length wise. Need to source a dremel then.
Hi, Cut the inside of stuck thread using a hacksaw blade, i have done that many times.
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Old 16th July 2014, 14:44   #756
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

How good is Gator Grip ETC-200MO Universal Socket? Any reviews?

http://www.amazon.com/Gator-Grip-ETC...A919PN8P4Z33DW
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Old 16th July 2014, 14:46   #757
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Hi, Cut the inside of stuck thread using a hacksaw blade, i have done that many times.
Have a sturdy hack saw blade handy. Will give it a try.
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Old 16th July 2014, 17:13   #758
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by dre@ms View Post
Have a sturdy hack saw blade handy. Will give it a try.
Hammer and old screwdriver. Use the screwdriver as a chisel, hold it at an angle to the broken edge (CCW, so hold it angled to left), and keep tapping it till the broken piece rotates and comes out. Once you get a couple of mm out, you can grip with a cutting plier or pipe wrench and rotate it out. That's what plumbers do.

If you are cutting with hacksaw blade, careful not to cut through threads. If the threads of the pipe (joint, elbow or T) get cut, you will have a perpetual drip.
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Old 16th July 2014, 18:05   #759
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
Hammer and old screwdriver. Use the screwdriver as a chisel, hold it at an angle to the broken edge (CCW, so hold it angled to left), and keep tapping it till the broken piece rotates and comes out. Once you get a couple of mm out, you can grip with a cutting plier or pipe wrench and rotate it out.
Afraid the water pipe is plastic. May be use less force and make use of WD40.
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Old 16th July 2014, 19:33   #760
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Afraid the water pipe is plastic. May be use less force and make use of WD40.
I said 'tap', not "thoko"! If the screw driver tip is hitting metal sort of tangentially, almost all the force will be transferred to the metal, not plastic, forcing it to turn. Good old desi "hathodi chhaini" jammed-nut/bolt-opening technology, albeit softer and controlled.

WD40 won't penetrate much because of the thread / teflon tape that the plumber would have wound around the tap threads while mounting. If the pipe side is PVC, then the best is tapping, not sawing the metal.

The other option is tapping in a wooden plug / dowel slightly larger OD than tap ID, and turning that plug carefully with a pipe wrench. Use hard wood, not soft wood.
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Old 16th July 2014, 19:59   #761
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
I said 'tap', not "thoko"! If the screw driver tip is hitting metal sort of tangentially, almost all the force will be transferred to the metal, not plastic, forcing it to turn. Good old desi "hathodi chhaini" jammed-nut/bolt-opening technology, albeit softer and controlled.

WD40 won't penetrate much because of the thread / teflon tape that the plumber would have wound around the tap threads while mounting. If the pipe side is PVC, then the best is tapping, not sawing the metal.

The other option is tapping in a wooden plug / dowel slightly larger OD than tap ID, and turning that plug carefully with a pipe wrench. Use hard wood, not soft wood.
Point taken. Infact, I am now using the pointed wooden churner handle to block the water coming out of the pipe. Its been almost a month now and the wood must have pretty much gelled with the thread part. So will use my wrench to turn the wood and see if it in turn unthreads the tap end.
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Old 16th July 2014, 22:00   #762
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

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Originally Posted by dre@ms View Post
Afraid the water pipe is plastic. May be use less force and make use of WD40.
If there is access to the pipe it might be easier to cut the plastic pipe and glue in a new joint with another plastic elbow or collar.
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Old 16th July 2014, 22:31   #763
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If there is access to the pipe it might be easier to cut the plastic pipe and glue in a new joint with another plastic elbow or collar.
There would be no need for asking here if it would have been that easy. Its all inside the wall.
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Old 17th July 2014, 12:52   #764
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer.

If everything fails, then you may have to break the wall around the pipe, cut it, and join a new segment. If you do that, use a normal metal stub, rather than a plastic pipe.
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Old 17th July 2014, 15:44   #765
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If everything fails, then you may have to break the wall around the pipe, cut it, and join a new segment. If you do that, use a normal metal stub, rather than a plastic pipe.
Will keep you posted on how it goes. Planning to do it today, since there is water scarcity and no need to close the overhead tank valve.
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