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Old 18th November 2014, 16:06   #826
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

I only have bits and pieces. My toolkit was enhanced by the hobby of making jewellery. Wish I had all my workshop tools from then!

Whatever you have, it will never be enough, and whatever job is to be done, there is always a perfect tool for it that you have to go out and buy. That is the way of tools!

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Old 30th November 2014, 21:55   #827
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
You will need a good ratcheting socket set, especially one that has a 6" or longer extension rod. Something like this: Bosch, Stanley or this one.


I find this one interesting since it has 3/8 and 1/4 options (perhaps more versatile?)

However, I am not sure if it satisfies my need for a simple screwdriver?

http://www.horme.com.sg/product.aspx?id=1828


Edit: High resolution picture here: http://stanley.stanleyblackanddecker...oducts/nid/142

Please advise.

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Old 1st December 2014, 13:12   #828
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I find this one interesting since it has 3/8 and 1/4 options (perhaps more versatile?) ...
Nah, not in India. By the 80's, no one used British sizes any more in India. I had an open spanner set with British sizes for my old '66 RE - wasn't required to use them for anything else after that. For example, 1/2" was replaced in India by 13mm, and a 12-13 is the spanner most commonly used by mechanics in India.
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Old 1st December 2014, 17:47   #829
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Nah, not in India. By the 80's, no one used British sizes any more in India. I had an open spanner set with British sizes for my old '66 RE - wasn't required to use them for anything else after that. For example, 1/2" was replaced in India by 13mm, and a 12-13 is the spanner most commonly used by mechanics in India.

Well, not quite true. Using metric spanner on imperial bolts and nuts is not a good idea. You will damage them, especially when you need to apply some force.

Maybe on modern stuff it's all metric now,but every nut and bolt on my restored 1975 bullet is still imperial.

Heroen
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Old 1st December 2014, 18:22   #830
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I find this one interesting since it has 3/8 and 1/4 options (perhaps more versatile?)

However, I am not sure if it satisfies my need for a simple screwdriver?
I am not sure about your need: there is a big difference between a simple screwdriver and a socket set. This is also rather expensive. You can get a good Stanley ratcheting screwdriver with ten bits for about five hundred Rs or so from Flipkart. Also look also at some of the Skil sets that they have for a more general purpose set including sockets. I bought a small, 30-piece one a few months ago, there are some very good larger ones.

My full socket set comes from 1970-something, and has about three different measurement systems including metric. I have only ever used about 1% of them, but it is nice to have.

Here are two screwdriver sets that I covet...

54-bit set for the precision stuff.

Macro bit set for general purpose.

I doubt that these two sets, together, would leave many screws unscrewable! Maybe for Christmas...

Last edited by Thad E Ginathom : 1st December 2014 at 18:26.
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Old 1st December 2014, 18:53   #831
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... Using metric spanner on imperial bolts and nuts is not a good idea. ...
I meant there are no BS sizes to be found in nuts and bolts in India. Well, one *can* find them, but usually in junkyards and really old shops. They gradually went out of fashion a long time back - only oldies like you and me will know where to expect them!

And you are right about not using Metric spanners etc. on BS nuts and bolts (and vice versa) - they are always a half size apart, and risky for the bolt head or nut. At a pinch I have jammed a screw-driver in the gap to get the job done, but I had always done that with my heart in my mouth.
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Old 1st December 2014, 23:28   #832
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I am looking for some simple tools for bar bending - to convert some spare iron rods (from construction work) into some shapes & forms which can be used practically on my rooftop.

I need an easy & economical solution for bending & cutting rods upto 10-12mm size. Last option is to look for some barbending in nearby construction sites for help or get one like this fabricated (which may not work out as required the first time itself).

Has anyone come across these hand held bender & cutter tools here in India (Bangalore)? Any suggestions please?

Some examples:
Bender: http://www.ebay.com/itm/370055629249
Bender & cutter: www.ebay.com/itm/231263191919

Any suggestions please?
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Old 3rd December 2014, 14:15   #833
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Nah, not in India. By the 80's, no one used British sizes any more in India.
Ok. So, 1/4th inch is the most useful in India, I suppose. I will then save some money by getting the cheaper version.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I am not sure about your need: there is a big difference between a simple screwdriver and a socket set. This is also rather expensive. You can get a good Stanley ratcheting screwdriver with ten bits for about five hundred Rs or so from Flipkart.
I have lost my screwdriver similar to the one shown here.


In addition, I would like to be able to turn some headlight adjustment gears in difficult to reach areas. Need something long and slim for that.

Plus, I have the requirement to have a nice tool set which can be used for various stuff within and outside the house.

During the past few days, there have been some good deals on tools with upto 50% off. So I might get something better by spending the same amount.

Quote:
Also look also at some of the Skil sets that they have for a more general purpose set including sockets.
Somehow I have ignore Skil thinking it is the inferior quality brand of Bosch.


BTW: How good are the electric screw-drivers? Can I use the bits from the Stanley set (linked above) in the electric screwdriver?

Last edited by S_U_N : 3rd December 2014 at 14:17.
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Old 4th December 2014, 02:37   #834
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Quote:
In addition, I would like to be able to turn some headlight adjustment gears in difficult to reach areas. Need something long and slim for that.
I don't think there is a combination set that would prevent me from using some of the simple, ordinary (and inexpensive) screwdrivers in my box. Just two of three of them actually cover most situations. I do still like the kits though, especially when they come with a ratchet handle.

Quote:
Somehow I have ignore Skil thinking it is the inferior quality brand of Bosch.
I know what you mean. My little kit looks great, but only time and meeting with a tough job or two will tell.

Quote:
BTW: How good are the electric screw-drivers? Can I use the bits from the Stanley set (linked above) in the electric screwdriver?
I don't have one. My craftsman friends in UK would never have manually screwed wood screws, or wall fixings (nor would they have dreamed of using a hammer!), they simply would not have had the time. They used sturdy, pro, rechargable electric screwdrivers, and they did not let them down on the job.

I use an electric drill!

Of course, it has to have variable speed and run slowly. It's fine for most stuff. It sometimes lacks the torque to finish the job, but still saves time in getting the screw 95% in.

I would like a cheap, small, battery-operated screwdriver. When regularly assembling PCs was a part of my job, I had one (it was very cheap: it came free with a bulk buy of floppy disks or something!) and it saved a huge amount of time even on just opening up and closing cases.
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Old 9th December 2014, 19:28   #835
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Does the Bosch 450 or 500RE drill set has variable speed settings? I am fixing my wooden cot and need to drill holes in it.
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Old 10th December 2014, 16:40   #836
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I am still hoping that the GOSF sale could bring out good deals to buy some tools at a great discount. Flipkart App gives you more discount, but still most of the Stanley stuff is not having much discount.
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Old 11th December 2014, 07:46   #837
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I am still hoping that the GOSF sale could bring out good deals to buy some tools at a great discount. Flipkart App gives you more discount, but still most of the Stanley stuff is not having much discount.
Very true and agree. I see skil tool kits for 299 from Tolexo. Never heard of this site and i am backing out. The one tool which caught my eye is the electronic screwdriver from the same website for 299. No idea about the website, so not willing to take a risk.
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Old 11th December 2014, 15:40   #838
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Ordered a new wet/dry Skil 8715 Vac thru Amazon, shortlisted this one after considering Karcher / EurekaForbes, due to its better suction power and the cost of the consumables esp hepa filter. The main reason for selecting more powered one is to attach a cyclone \ Thien baffle dust collector. Has anyone made a dust collector for their vacs, any diy ideas using easily available materials?

BTW, any idea where can we get the cone shaped traffic lane divider in bangalore?

Quote:
Originally Posted by null View Post
I need an easy & economical solution for bending & cutting rods upto 10-12mm size.
Check any construction sites. They wont use any ready-made product for bending, they make themselves and the key is the space b\n the 3 lugs. A better one can be made in your local workshop too.


Quote:
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I use an electric drill!

Of course, it has to have variable speed and run slowly. It's fine for most stuff. It sometimes lacks the torque to finish the job, but still saves time in getting the screw 95% in.

I would like a cheap, small, battery-operated screwdriver. When regularly assembling PCs was a part of my job, I had one (it was very cheap: it came free with a bulk buy of floppy disks or something!) and it saved a huge amount of time even on just opening up and closing cases.
Electric screwdrivers are a handy tool for a diyer. But the quality (torque and load capacity) depends on the battery power (min 12 -24v with good maH) and unless its a good branded one, your driver will be useless and those are very expensive too. I have an electric screwdriver which works on AC, portability was not my priority as I have long cable extenders. It has pretty good torque and has 23 torque settings, it serves my purpose, I got it for a good deal from eBay using 25% disc coupon. For normal jobs, I use a 5v battery operated, but converted to AC using a 2A adapter.

Last edited by ::CMS:: : 11th December 2014 at 16:03.
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Old 12th December 2014, 14:38   #839
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Quote:
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... need an easy & economical solution for bending & cutting rods upto 10-12mm size. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ::CMS:: View Post
... Check any construction sites. ...
Both are available for rental at hardware stores - check in your neighborhood. For cutting, the electric large wheel (diamond) cutting saw is the best. For bending, you have to rig up the rod holder pivot (pro benders normally hammer in a couple of pieces of rebar in a log of wood), and use a simple cog-type bender with a long steel pipe for leverage. This is available in large hardware stores - just ask for a bar bender.

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... Has anyone made a dust collector for their vacs, any diy ideas using easily available materials? ...
Suction side or exhaust side? Simple solution is to buy car air filters and adapt. (Safari for cyclone type, any other for paper type).

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... BTW, any idea where can we get the cone shaped traffic lane divider in bangalore? ...
What do you need it for? These are not available in shops, since distributors / dealers sell in bulk to municipal and police agencies. If you need old ones, head to Gujli in Shivajinagar (the lane opposite Russel Market).

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... depends on the battery power (min 12 -24v with good maH) and unless its a good branded one, ...
DIY cordless tools are usually 3.6/7.2/10.8V (NiCd, NiMH), or 6/12/18/36V (LiIon). The lower voltage ones are for home DIY, and the higher voltage ones for heavy duty pro work at construction sites. Some brands have a common battery pack for all their cordless tools - jigsaws, circular saws, drills, drill-drivers, etc - so that one can just rotate 2 batteries after charging overnight.
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Old 12th December 2014, 16:13   #840
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post

Suction side or exhaust side? Simple solution is to buy car air filters and adapt. (Safari for cyclone type, any other for paper type).

What do you need it for? These are not available in shops, since distributors / dealers sell in bulk to municipal and police agencies. If you need old ones, head to Gujli in Shivajinagar (the lane opposite Russel Market).
Didnt get you, for more info on Cyclone \ Thien dustcollectors:
- http://www.oneida-air.com/static.asp...owitworks.html

The traffic cone is for making cyclone dust collector.


Quote:
DIY cordless tools are usually 3.6/7.2/10.8V (NiCd, NiMH), or 6/12/18/36V (LiIon). The lower voltage ones are for home DIY, and the higher voltage ones for heavy duty pro work at construction sites. Some brands have a common battery pack for all their cordless tools - jigsaws, circular saws, drills, drill-drivers, etc - so that one can just rotate 2 batteries after charging overnight.
Most of the professionals use 12-24v cordless devices as its convenient and economical. Any low volt devices will struggle to generate enough torque even for DIY works, it includes some 12v devices also. Most professional works, a 24v device is more than enough, almost all tool companies has 24v in their portfolio.
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