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Old 12th December 2014, 17:22   #841
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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Didnt get you, for more info on Cyclone ...
The traffic cone is for making cyclone dust collector. ...
I know about Cyclone separators. What I meant was you can either use an old air filter from a Safari / Sumo Gold and convert it to a vortex arrangement (it is a cylinder), or use any old paper-based automotive air filter, since the air volume requirements are roughly the same.

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Most of the professionals use 12-24v cordless devices as its convenient and economical. Any low volt devices will struggle to generate enough torque even for DIY works, it includes some 12v devices also. Most professional works, a 24v device is more than enough, almost all tool companies has 24v in their portfolio.
The 24V version is popular only in UK. In US, Europe, Japan, China etc. the 12V ones suffice for pros. Some people do think "more is better" and get even the 36V versions.

Good low-voltage ones generate enough torque to dislocate one's wrist when the screw jams suddenly. Been using a Bosch 3.6V device for the last 20+ years, and there is yet to be a situation where it fell short. Suffices for for my carpentry and general needs. Also, things go smoother in tough situations if one puts a tiny bit of bees-wax on the tip of the screw when starting to drive it in. Torque depends on the motor *current* rating, and yes higher voltage will help keep the current, and hence heat, down.
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Old 12th December 2014, 20:11   #842
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I know about Cyclone separators. What I meant was you can either use an old air filter from a Safari / Sumo Gold and convert it to a vortex arrangement (it is a cylinder),
Decreasing radii.

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Old 12th December 2014, 20:26   #843
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Decreasing radii. ...
Correct. That's just a matter of a semicircle of 1mm alu (or even thinner GI) sheet formed into a cone of appropriate size! The air pipe fitting is a bigger challenge.
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Old 12th December 2014, 20:48   #844
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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The 24V version is popular only in UK. In US, Europe, Japan, China etc. the 12V ones suffice for pros. Some people do think "more is better" and get even the 36V versions.

Good low-voltage ones generate enough torque to dislocate one's wrist when the screw jams suddenly. Been using a Bosch 3.6V device for the last 20+ years, and there is yet to be a situation where it fell short. Suffices for for my carpentry and general needs. Also, things go smoother in tough situations if one puts a tiny bit of bees-wax on the tip of the screw when starting to drive it in. Torque depends on the motor *current* rating, and yes higher voltage will help keep the current, and hence heat, down.
I am not sure about US/UK, I know only about whats available in India, 24v is very much available. I am talking based on my experience. I myself is an Interior Designer and running a small business entity in Bangalore-Cochin (eventhough I am working as an IT professional in Bangalore). We are using a 12v for regular screwing or normal drilling purposes on wood and metal with predrilled holes where a lot of torque is not required and an 18v for heavy duty. I have seen 3.6v Bosch and the torque is ok for normal use and not intended for daily or continuous use.

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I know about Cyclone separators. What I meant was you can either use an old air filter from a Safari / Sumo Gold and convert it to a vortex arrangement (it is a cylinder), or use any old paper-based automotive air filter, since the air volume requirements are roughly the same.
Can you post a link for a similar design? As far as I understand commercial vortex cylinders are using the centrifugal force to create a cyclone effect to separate the dust. Unless the dust is not separated before reaching the airfilter (not the Hepa filter in the VAC), it will be chocked with the dust in notime. Eventhough I am making this for my DIY use at home I will be using the same at my project sites, inspired by a client requirement to have a very clean environment as he had asthma.

Last edited by ::CMS:: : 12th December 2014 at 20:52.
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Old 12th December 2014, 22:39   #845
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I was looking for some cyclone build videos, voila got a video same as my plan, using the street cone, its a simple build :
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Old 13th December 2014, 09:54   #846
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

What type of drill bits are used for drilling through Aluminium profiles? I want some clothes line brackets to be fabricated so they can be drilled to the balcony wall. We get scrap Aluminium from our yard so thinking of getting the appropriate bit and drilling them at home. Can fix them during the weekend.

The current ones are hung so high, it’s a pain to hang the clothes.
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Old 13th December 2014, 12:12   #847
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What type of drill bits are used for drilling through Aluminium profiles?
I bought this recently, i wanted to drill a 7mm hole in cast iron to cut M8 threads. Although i wanted only 7mm bit i bought the kit as its reasonably priced and covers all metric sizes from 1 to 13 which is useful to have.

Bosch 25pcs HSS-R-Metal Drill Bit Set
http://www.amazon.in/gp/product/B0012RW4OU

PS: I didn't buy from the above seller and the above link doesn't show fulfilled by Amazon as it did when i bought it.

Last edited by Sankar : 13th December 2014 at 12:30.
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Old 13th December 2014, 14:53   #848
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Aluminium is soft: use a twist drill, but even a cheap one would probably do.

HSS twist drills are good for almost everything other than masonry (and specialist stuff like glass) as long as the drill has the guts to cope, and you can hold the thing to be drilled firmly and safely. That is very important. A high-speed spinning piece of metal is very much not to be desired, and don't think you can hoid it with your foot, like you might do a piece of wood: if the drill snags, you might loose a piece of foot .

I've drilled holes in steel, silver, gold, copper. I don't recall aluminium, but maybe! Use a centre punch, or the bit will just go skating. The thing about aluminium is its low melting point: keep the speed slowish.

Actually, the first question should have been: what size holes do you have to drill?
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Old 13th December 2014, 20:10   #849
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Correct. That's just a matter of a semicircle of 1mm alu (or even thinner GI) sheet formed into a cone of appropriate size! The air pipe fitting is a bigger challenge.
I don't think the question was on how to make a cone, but whether for the given purpose (making a cyclone) a cone and a cylinder would functionally be the same.

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What type of drill bits are used for drilling through Aluminium profiles?
Normal twist drills (118 deg angle) work quite well. For Al, carbon steel will do just fine, no need of HSS. If you want to get more technical, preferred lubricant for machining Al is kerosene.

Be warned though, if you are drilling thin sheets, normal twist drills will leave you with a nonround hole.

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Sutripta
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Old 13th December 2014, 21:10   #850
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... i wanted to drill a 7mm hole in cast iron to cut M8 threads. ...
Get a carbide-tipped bit, will be faster (of course with cooling - use an oil-water emulsion). Cast iron is much more abrasive than steel. HSS bit will also do, but you will run through the bit and your patience before the hole is through!


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I don't think the question was ...
That would need you to visualise the paths of air and the heavier particles. Been there, done that, nothing new - this is an old concept. Don't have a drafting app on my iPad, unfortunately. Traffic cone, being plastic, would be the easiest to work with, but a WGC to buy in India.


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Old 13th December 2014, 22:01   #851
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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What type of drill bits are used for drilling through Aluminium profiles?
If your requirement is limited, dont buy the bits as a set, some you may never use. Ask for a metal drill bit for your required size in any hardware shop and it will be a twist drill bit. Dont break your head on the technicalities. If you are a first timer, you can do a trial in a scrap piece and within 5mins you will be able to make perfect round hole in aluminium. Also get a medium grit file or a counter sink bit to clear the hole. Make sure you use safety glass and make a habit of wearing gloves (rubber dotted) while handling any tools.

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a cone and a cylinder would functionally be the same.
Functionally they are same, all methods creates the cyclone in one way or the other, but there is difference in the effectiveness of filtering. The cone cyclone filters are far cheap and more effective in filtering.

Last edited by ::CMS:: : 13th December 2014 at 22:20.
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Old 13th December 2014, 23:25   #852
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i wanted to drill a 7mm hole in cast iron to cut M8 threads.
Sorry, missed that. Must learn to read properly before answering!
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Old 14th December 2014, 13:20   #853
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When drilling in thin sheets, use a smaller diameter for the hole. Say 5mm for a 7mm hole. Then use a conical grinding bit to smoothen the irregular hole. To avoid the thin sheet swiveling with the drill bit, back it with a wooden piece.
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Old 14th December 2014, 14:09   #854
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I want to buy a set of box spanners with t-handles. Where in Bangalore can I buy these?
I wanna use them for DIY maintenance activities on my Pulsar 150

Last edited by sumeshmani : 14th December 2014 at 14:10.
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Old 14th December 2014, 15:10   #855
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I want to buy a set of box spanners with t-handles. Where in Bangalore can I buy these?
I wanna use them for DIY maintenance activities on my Pulsar 150
Azeez trading is a good shop for all the tools. It is on the N R Road. It is on left side as you enter the sirsi cicle flyover ramp near the market. Check out with them. Parking is a big problem here.
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