Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff > DIY - Do it yourself


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 6th November 2016, 12:06   #1411
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 254
Thanked: 99 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
Got hold of my first Torque Wrench. Not a high end, expensive import..but an affordable, good quality Indian.
How much did you pay for this? I was thinking of getting a Taparia torque wrench which costs 4k for my occasional use.

Last edited by Gannu_1 : 11th November 2016 at 06:28. Reason: Typo.
Holyghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th November 2016, 14:33   #1412
BHPian
 
adrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Trivandrum
Posts: 692
Thanked: 417 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holyghost View Post
How much did you pay for this? I was thinking of getting a Taparia torque wrench which is costs 4k for my occasional use.
I paid Rs.3300/- to my local vendor for this non ratchet type TM50 from Torque Master. The shop had a ratchet type Taparia TW50 which was a solid one and being a couple of years old, I got an offer for Rs.3000/-. But since there was some rust in the torque wrench, I declined the offer and took the Torque Master, which was brand new. The vendor said that the new MRP for a taparia ratchet type TW50 is Rs.3600/-

Personally I would have bought the Taparia had it not been an old stock.
adrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2016, 21:26   #1413
BHPian
 
adrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Trivandrum
Posts: 692
Thanked: 417 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Tyre spoons again - but this time for the motorcycle. This is a Chinese make with no brand. The build quality is good and the tool is compact and light enough to be carried in a backpack or inside the pannier.

Tools for a DIYer-tyrespoon1.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-tyrespoon2.jpg
adrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th November 2016, 02:49   #1414
BHPian
 
gendarmee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: India
Posts: 720
Thanked: 18 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Got a question: The workshop manual lists using molybednum oil on the piston, value guides, cam shaft, and crankshaft bearings during engine assembly. Could not find anything online. Can any suggest where I can find it, or any alternative I could use that i can find locally? I could only find this Liqui Moly Gear-Oil Additive(isn't an oil and delivery time is uber long)
gendarmee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11th November 2016, 03:41   #1415
BHPian
 
Leoshashi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Ranchi
Posts: 682
Thanked: 2,633 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
Got hold of my first Torque Wrench. Not a high end, expensive import..but an affordable, good quality Indian.
Now this is something which I have been eyeing since long. The only thing holding me back is the question of calibration. How do you plan to calibrate it, and most importantly, when is it needed??

Regards,
Shashi
Leoshashi is offline   (3) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 11th November 2016, 09:21   #1416
BHPian
 
adrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Trivandrum
Posts: 692
Thanked: 417 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoshashi View Post
Now this is something which I have been eyeing since long. The only thing holding me back is the question of calibration. How do you plan to calibrate it, and most importantly, when is it needed??

Regards,
Shashi
Hi Leoshashi, if your usage frequency is low, the calibration shall be done every two years. If you drop the wrench, then it would be a good idea to get the calibration done immediately and if you are a regular user, then the calibration shall be done every year.

Also keep in mind that the values in the mid range of a torque wrench will be more accurate when compare to the upper and lower limits. I need around 4-5 Kgf m torque (mainly clutch related jobs) to work on my Bullet. So I chose the one in the range 1-7 kgf m because 4-5 comes somewhat as the middle range and will be more accurate.

As to where the calibration is to be done- my only option is to get it done at Coimbatore.
Another option is to follow the you tube videos to quick check the accuracy of the tool at home (the accuracy of the method is debatable) and the wrench can be adjusted for error correction or can be calibrated if it too out.


Last edited by adrian : 11th November 2016 at 09:26.
adrian is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 12th November 2016, 18:11   #1417
BHPian
 
diyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 215
Thanked: 73 Times
Default

I am trying to clean the grime from our tea thermoses and am appalled at the dried muck in there. I did some jugaad by using a bottle cleaner attached to my drill. This was able to clean the bottom inside of the thermos very well but not the side walls. Any thoughts on an attachment that can help?Name:  ImageUploadedByTeamBHP1478954501.703030.jpg
Views: 334
Size:  438.3 KB
diyguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12th November 2016, 19:02   #1418
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,015
Thanked: 888 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy View Post
I am trying to clean the grime from our tea thermoses and am appalled at the dried muck in there. I did some jugaad by using a bottle cleaner attached to my drill. This was able to clean the bottom inside of the thermos very well but not the side walls. Any thoughts on an attachment that can help?Attachment 1575246
I used Harpic to clean my Thermos. Did the job and not a spot of grime left. Just ensure that you wash the thermos thoroughly, first with a detergent and then a couple of times with water.
Aroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th November 2016, 21:12   #1419
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 6,992
Thanked: 5,033 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
Another option is to follow the you tube videos to quick check the accuracy of the tool at home (the accuracy of the method is debatable) and the wrench can be adjusted for error correction or can be calibrated if it too out.
Should he not have set the wrech to a lower torque and then checked that it didn't click?
Thad E Ginathom is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 12th November 2016, 21:25   #1420
BHPian
 
diyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 215
Thanked: 73 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
I used Harpic to clean my Thermos.
my wife has tried everything - vinegar, baking soda, dish washer soap, vim liquid etc. I will try Harpic, thanks!
diyguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12th November 2016, 23:42   #1421
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,548
Thanked: 4,525 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
Also keep in mind that the values in the mid range of a torque wrench will be more accurate when compare to the upper and lower limits. I need around 4-5 Kgf m torque (mainly clutch related jobs) to work on my Bullet. So I chose the one in the range 1-7 kgf m because 4-5 comes somewhat as the middle range and will be more accurate.
]

Mid range the most accurate? Why would that be, I don't think so. Please elaborate
Jeroen
Jeroen is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13th November 2016, 00:19   #1422
BHPian
 
adrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Trivandrum
Posts: 692
Thanked: 417 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Should he not have set the wrech to a lower torque and then checked that it didn't click?
I think you meant to say "to set it to a higher torque and checked that it didn't click". Thanks for throwing in something to think, as you always do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Mid range the most accurate? Why would that be, I don't think so. Please elaborate
Jeroen
Please see the excerpt from the manual of Snapon Torque tools

Tools for a DIYer-torque.jpg

https://www1.snapon.com/V2/Groups/cm...e_Brochure.pdf

I also heard the same in many you tube videos pertaining to torque wrenches. I may have misunderstood the information and you are always welcome to correct me.

Last edited by adrian : 13th November 2016 at 00:22. Reason: correcting wrong link and brand mentioned
adrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th November 2016, 00:47   #1423
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 6,992
Thanked: 5,033 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
I think you meant to say "to set it to a higher torque and checked that it didn't click". Thanks for throwing in something to think, as you always do.
This is incredibly simple, but causing me brain pain!

Yes, you are right. I don't know how I got the wrong way of thinking so fixed in my brain.

Thanks!
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th November 2016, 13:34   #1424
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,548
Thanked: 4,525 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian View Post
Please see the excerpt from the manual of Snapon Torque tools
.

Itís more a rule of thumb where they sort of combine the actual accuracy of a torque wrench and the properties of how bolts tighten.

Came across this one, which I think must be pretty handy too:

http://sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip.html
Jeroen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th November 2016, 14:02   #1425
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,015
Thanked: 888 Times
Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Itís more a rule of thumb where they sort of combine the actual accuracy of a torque wrench and the properties of how bolts tighten.

Came across this one, which I think must be pretty handy too:

http://sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip.html
This is a very old design, and good for low torque jobs, as you have to keep monitoring the torque applied constantly and stop when the needle reaches the desired torque. Still it is better than nothing. Ratchet type wrenches will not permit more than the torque set, while this design you can inadvertently over torque, which in case of small fasteners can strip the threads.
Aroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bangalore : Fantastic store for tools kartikkumar Shifting gears 22 27th September 2012 01:15
Amplifier Installation Help: For DIYer nitin.dangayach In-Car Entertainment 52 10th March 2010 18:59
Power tools dadu Gadgets, Computers & Software 15 16th June 2008 12:05
tools for bike garage bullboy Motorbikes 1 11th September 2006 12:50


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 15:39.

Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks