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Old 13th November 2016, 14:04   #1426
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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This is a very old design, and good for low torque jobs, as you have to keep monitoring the torque applied constantly and stop when the needle reaches the desired torque. Still it is better than nothing. Ratchet type wrenches will not permit more than the torque set, while this design you can inadvertently over torque, which in case of small fasteners can strip the threads.
Not to put to fine a point, itís actually a hoax! Read it carefully!

Although the needle type torque do exist and can be more accurate than the ratchet ones, if used properly!
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Old 21st November 2016, 14:56   #1427
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Got a question: The Suzuki Acess workshop manual lists using molybednum oil on the piston, value guides, cam shaft, and crankshaft bearings during engine assembly. Could not find anything online. Can any suggest where I can find it, or any alternative I could use that i can find locally? I could only find this Liqui Moly Gear-Oil Additive(isn't an oil and delivery time is uber long)
Ended up getting Permatex 81950 Ultra Slick Engine Assembly Lube, 4 oz.

One more queston: Would it make sense to use the torque listed in the workshop manual for the crankcase, bore and the engine head? Both the authorized workshop and mechanics outside suggest tightening the nuts as much it can be physically tightened and mention that it is to be done only when assembling a new engine. Also, should the threads be oiled prior to tightening the bolts or should they be completely dry?

(Why: Need to re-do an access and activa engine)

Last edited by gendarmee : 21st November 2016 at 15:10.
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Old 21st November 2016, 15:28   #1428
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my wife has tried everything - vinegar, baking soda, dish washer soap, vim liquid etc. I will try Harpic, thanks!
If Harpic doesn't work, try Mr. Muscle Kitchen Cleaner. At least I haven't found anything yet that can withstand its power.

Cheers,
Vikram
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Old 21st November 2016, 16:06   #1429
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If Harpic doesn't work, try Mr. Muscle Kitchen Cleaner. At least I haven't found anything yet that can withstand its power.
I used harpic and left it in different positions so the harpic could act on the whole area of grime. Now I have grime only at the bottom about 1cm high around the inside perimeter on the sides. I had poured about 100ml harpic inside and let rest each night at a different angle along its length and the walls are now grime free except for the ring at the bottom. Will pour another 200ml and leave it standing for a night and report back. If this doesn't work will purchase the mr. muscle. I have used it in the past but it is not freely available in my vicinity
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Old 21st November 2016, 16:33   #1430
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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One more queston: Would it make sense to use the torque listed in the workshop manual for the crankcase, bore and the engine head? Both the authorized workshop and mechanics outside suggest tightening the nuts as much it can be physically tightened and mention that it is to be done only when assembling a new engine. Also, should the threads be oiled prior to tightening the bolts or should they be completely dry?

(Why: Need to re-do an access and activa engine)
Just sharing my little experiences gained upon putting together Lambretta and Vijai Super engines. They are also cast aluminium casings and hence the same theory should be applicable on your scooters as well.

While tightening without a torque wrench Mechanics know when to stop, from their years of experience. However, for a first timer over-tightening a stud happens very often and will end up carrying the crankcase to a lathe-guy for repairing (by welding and tapping or rethreading the hole with a helicoil. If you have access to a torque wrench, please buy one. There is a reason why manufacturer has mentioned a torque specification for a bolt / nut /stud. And those values are applicable and to be adhered to irrespective of whether an engine is new or old.

Note: I still dont have a torque-wrench, however haven't ripped off any threads in the last 2 engine rebuilds.
-Ilango
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Old 21st November 2016, 17:10   #1431
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Mr. Muscle Kitchen Cleaner. At least I haven't found anything yet that can withstand its power. Vikram
I second Vikram on this. Mr. Muscle Kitchen Cleaner is hardcore cleaning agent. However do not leave the bottle in open for prolonged period. I left it out in balcony for about two weeks & found that the cleaning strength of liquid had reduced drastically. I generally use it to get rid of grime from alloys & wheels.
NEVER EVER use it on any painted area. It will leave spray spots.

Regards.
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Old 21st November 2016, 17:18   #1432
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If Harpic doesn't work, try Mr. Muscle Kitchen Cleaner. At least I haven't found anything yet that can withstand its power.

Cheers,
Vikram
Concentrated hydrochloric acid.

Removes stains and scales on tiles and stainless steel sinks that even Mr Muscle cannot. But these are not meant to be sold openly in shops ever since acid attacks were on the rise. Some smaller shops do sell them as 'cleaning agents' in plastic bottles. Appears pale yellow in color.

It can cause itching if the skin comes in contact. I've had a bad experience when I was cleaning the bathroom using the acid. The scales caused due to the hard water would never go and I had to resort to HCl.

Last edited by Gannu_1 : 21st November 2016 at 17:21.
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Old 21st November 2016, 17:20   #1433
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Try white harpic once. I have found it to be extremely effective against more or less everything.
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Old 21st November 2016, 22:57   #1434
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Concentrated hydrochloric acid.

...

It can cause itching if the skin comes in contact.
I think it can cause more than itching. More like major burning and serious injury.

But, my experience with acids in recent decades is limited to concentrated sulphuric and concentrated nitric, Mostly the former. Both seriously nasty if mishandled or spilt in an accident. I'm under the impression that conc. hydrochloric is equally dangerous.

By the way, when doing my jewellery hobby, if I ever felt like a nettle sting or slight burn, I knew it would be an acid splash, and with H2SO4, even the dilute acid burns. Soap... I'd immediately wash the area with lots of ordinary soap.

By the way... all this was thirty years ago in London. I don't know what is available in India or what they call it. is "cleaning acid," HCL?
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Old 22nd November 2016, 11:49   #1435
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Concentrated hydrochloric acid.
We do get this freely in chennai in supermarkets and corner stores but I am hesitant to use it on food containers. That will be my last option.

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Try white harpic once.
I used white harpic for its lesser odor and it worked well. I still have a small ring of grime which I am yet to act on.
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Old 22nd November 2016, 14:43   #1436
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We do get this freely in chennai in supermarkets and corner stores
Madness! Complete madness!
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but I am hesitant to use it on food containers. That will be my last option.
As per my previous post, with some experience of working with dangerous, concentrated acids, I would strongly recommend against it. It only takes one splash in the eye
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Old 22nd November 2016, 14:56   #1437
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Madness! Complete madness!
Sorry I may have made a mistake on the exact chemical composition of the cleaning acid that is available. It may not be concentrated HCL but it is cleaning acid that one purchases to clean tiles and walls after diluting in water. It does stink and release fumes when mixing with water.
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Old 22nd November 2016, 15:02   #1438
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Sorry I may have made a mistake on the exact chemical composition of the cleaning acid that is available. It may not be concentrated HCL but it is cleaning acid that one purchases to clean tiles and walls after diluting in water. It does stink and release fumes when mixing with water.
It is acid, nitric, sulphuric, or HCL. I am not sure about the concentrated part.
It is widely used in Indian homes, and stores do stock it as "tezaab". I dont know if it is still available as freely, though.
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Old 22nd November 2016, 21:10   #1439
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It is acid, nitric, sulphuric, or HCL. I am not sure about the concentrated part.
It matters quite a lot! Sulphuric acid reacts with water to produce heat. Because of this, even diluting the stuff requires knowledge to be safe.

If I remember right (and for god's sake, nobody should take this as instructions! )...

Adding water to H2SO4... the reaction is powerful enough to cause drops of water to boil and water and acid flies all over the place

Adding H2SO4 to water... The mixture gets hot, but there is not that small-area intense-reaction.

This is hugely and vitally important to get right if handling sulphuric acid. I doubt if it would be used in circumstances where water and acid might be splashing around. But there is no limit to stupidity levels!

Trivia... our stomachs contain HCL

Trivia 2... I used to enjoy that, if I took the cap off my bottle of conc Nitric acid, brown fumes would rise from it like some evil genie. I got my nose a little too close once: the effect was pretty evil. Thankfully, nothing so serious that a few minutes gasping wouldn't fix. Another acid-danger lesson learnt the hard way! Yep: stupidity levels! <Blush>
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Old 26th November 2016, 19:24   #1440
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My Hitachi drill came in a cardboard case and for a long time I looking for a hard case for it. Recent search on the internet brought me to the Pro-Tech Power Tool Box, which is suitable for up to 26 mm drill machines.

Tools for a DIYer-case.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-case1.jpg

Tools for a DIYer-case2.jpg
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