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Old 21st March 2010, 01:12   #811
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KHOJ - How many units do you consume per months at 24 degrees ?
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Old 21st March 2010, 01:39   #812
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@alter.e.go

Never checked but give me a few days and I will try to assimilate relevant data.
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Old 21st March 2010, 08:46   #813
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recshenoy View Post
while fitting window A/C a hole to the wall rite! one can't do it in rented house.
Just curious, what exactly the mechanic did during servicing?

That is why he said "if a window unit can't be installed for some reason"! In my case all our windows have a provision for AC at the top right hand corner. We only have to remove a glass, unscrew a grille and voila, the window is ready to receive the AC!

He basically did a thorough cleaning, inside and out. The unit was removed, taken outside, all covers/shields including the ones over the impeller were unscrewed and then the innards washed squeaky clean. The unit is installed at a height of ~ 6 feet and so requires two people.

The company (Samsung) offers a service for Rs 285, but they don't take the unit down. They basically pull the unit out partly and clean with a wet brush, which was not sufficient for me. I feel this kind of spring cleaning is required once a year. I normally clean the front grille, air-filter and the fins over the front of the condenser coil every month and don't call the technician.
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Which home/office AC (air conditioner) to buy ?-dsc00467.jpg  


Last edited by Gansan : 21st March 2010 at 09:00.
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Old 21st March 2010, 09:45   #814
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Gansan, as per your pic, the stabilizer is in a very vulnerable position, just below the AC.
If, for whatever reason, the condensate drain gets clogged and the tray fills up with water, you could have some falling on the stabilizer! And we all know that electricity does not like water!
Please shift the stabilizer to a safer location.
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Old 21st March 2010, 11:06   #815
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any idea about the difference in price and effectiveness between a split and a cassette a/c? I know both are split but I am looking for a more effective unit that can save power.
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Old 21st March 2010, 12:34   #816
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
Gansan, as per your pic, the stabilizer is in a very vulnerable position, just below the AC.
If, for whatever reason, the condensate drain gets clogged and the tray fills up with water, you could have some falling on the stabilizer! And we all know that electricity does not like water!
Please shift the stabilizer to a safer location.

I had no idea about this risk! Will get it shifted asap. Thanks!
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Old 21st March 2010, 12:36   #817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khoj View Post
Thermacole is a sterile medium(does not host bio organisms) so a safe option, its light & cheap.

Agree on properties of thermocole but the high density thermocole is not manufactured in India therefore the idea is not practical. For insulation it is better to have dual wall construction but this is possible only in a private construction.
XPS (Extruded polysterene) is a product designed for this type of application, both for walls and roofs. It is a very light weight material and comes in sheet form of various thickness, eg 50mm. Companies like Isoboard and Owens Corning supply this kind of product in India.
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Old 21st March 2010, 13:25   #818
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
That is why he said "if a window unit can't be installed for some reason"! In my case all our windows have a provision for AC at the top right hand corner. We only have to remove a glass, unscrew a grille and voila, the window is ready to receive the AC!

He basically did a thorough cleaning, inside and out. The unit was removed, taken outside, all covers/shields including the ones over the impeller were unscrewed and then the innards washed squeaky clean. The unit is installed at a height of ~ 6 feet and so requires two people.

The company (Samsung) offers a service for Rs 285, but they don't take the unit down. They basically pull the unit out partly and clean with a wet brush, which was not sufficient for me. I feel this kind of spring cleaning is required once a year. I normally clean the front grille, air-filter and the fins over the front of the condenser coil every month and don't call the technician.
Hi Gansan,

I refer to your earlier post regarding the window vs. split air con. While I do not wish to get in to any elaborate exchange regarding the advantages /disadvantages of the two types all I will say is that every day technology is improving and striving to make machines more efficient, in line with that the split is a natural progression from the window unit. Hence if you decide to go with a split then the last part of this post would be of interest to you.

As for the service itself, it is indeed easy and essential to keep the filter and condenser clean and an old toothbrush is often all that is required. However the evaporator needs to be cleaned too at least once a year. I have both splits and windows at home and year on year the split's out door units tend to accumulate less dirt/grime etc than the window units. This when both the window units are installed in relatively cleaner locations and the three splits are completely exposed to the elements.

The wash that the local service men do is more harmful to the air con than anything else. These guys normally use household detergent to clean out the unit. This detergent has caustic which tends to accumulate in nooks and crannies and slowly eats away the fins making them brittle and eventually they sort of start crumbling. The annual cleaning should be done using just plain water or ideally with an air blower and no water at all. If you want to do it your self then just run your vacuum cleaner in the reverse direction and your suction hose becomes a perfect blow tube.

In case you are not satisfied with this dry cleaning then there are non caustic foams available in handy cannisters. these look similar to the mosquito repellent cans etc with a similar nozzle. You essentially spray the contents on the condenser and the evaporator fins. Soon you will see a whole lot of foam and this will flow down carrying all the grime with it. Wipe the bottom and you have a clean air con.

I have been using these techniques and my Amtrex 2 tonner bought in early/mid 90s is still going strong & so is the Videocon 1.5 ton bought in 99, that is a decade and a half and a decade respectively with absolutely no repairs ever on either machine. The air con is a near perfect machine and if we do not play holi with it using Caustic etc. it will easily last for decade and then some more.


Quote:
Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
Gansan, as per your pic, the stabilizer is in a very vulnerable position, just below the AC.
If, for whatever reason, the condensate drain gets clogged and the tray fills up with water, you could have some falling on the stabilizer! And we all know that electricity does not like water!
Please shift the stabilizer to a safer location.
The air con unit is always installed with its back portion at a slightly lower level than the front. This is to avoid exactly what you have mentioned in your post above. The slope allows the accumulated water to spill over the edge and out.

Having said that the stabilizer is indeed not in the best location. I would prefer it to be on the wall alongside the air con. It would definitely be in the way as and when the heavy air con unit is to be taken out completely for annual servicing etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by devarshi84 View Post
any idea about the difference in price and effectiveness between a split and a cassette a/c? I know both are split but I am looking for a more effective unit that can save power.
The cassette's are essentially splits which require ducting. Further to install the cassette itself you will require a false ceiling. The wall or even a floor standing split does not require either of those. The cassette are generally used where a larger area is to be covered using a single outdoor unit with a single large capacity compressor or multiple compressors in tandem.

To save on power you can look at the Atom split units offered by Hitachi where they run multiple indoor units using a single outdoor unit or for true power saving you could look at the inverter units being offered by Daikin, Panasonic in our markets.

While on the topic of power saving Samsung has a full page advert in today's HT Bombay edition claiming 31% power saving with 'S' series compressor and they claim the unit can work at 54 degree C and with input voltage as low as 135V to as high as 290V. The model is rated 5 star and the prices are 19K for 1 Ton and 25K for 1.5 Ton including installation as per the local Samsung plaza (over phone).

Last edited by khoj : 21st March 2010 at 13:29.
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Old 21st March 2010, 13:34   #819
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Default best way to fix the broken drain pipe of a split AC ?

Recently, the painters painting the external wall of my residence have broken the drain pipe of the internal unit that comes out through the wall. Now what all I see is a half an inch hole in the wall.

How best to fix this? I do not want water to drip on to the wall.
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Old 21st March 2010, 13:46   #820
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Many many years back in New Jersey, I once moved into a big house with central air-conditioning. However, my bedroom at the extreme end of the house was not getting adequate cooling. So I was told a window AC might solve my cooling problems.

So what did I do? I walked into the near by Sears, picked up a Window AC and brought it home in my Acura sedan. I opened the box, pulled out the AC. Then I opened the window half way up, lifted the AC into the window, while holding/balancing the AC on the window sill in one hand, I brought the window down in the other to lock the AC in place. I closed the gap on both sides using the collapsible shutter given along with the AC unit. Then I connected the power, and it started working. I installed AC for the first time in my life, taking only 10 minutes. I must have spent more time reading the manual.

Why can't this happen in India? Simple, there is no standardization in either windows or AC units in India. So we are dependent on technician to do what can be the simplest of jobs.
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Old 21st March 2010, 14:48   #821
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AC units here are standardized for outer dimensions but the windows are another story.

The other difference is the weight of the units. Window units in the US tend to start at 0.5 ton and generally peak at 1 ton. Also the cross section of the condenser and evaporator is smaller compared to the huge ones in our market due to the weather conditions. Thereby the units there are lighter and a single person can easily lift and install it.

The install is further made simple by the locking panels/fins that jut out of the units casing, thereby one does not need to nail or screw in the chassis.

I think Samurai, it is because we are a Socialist Republic and these non standard things allow for creation of extra jobs where none would have existed in case the scenario was like the US.
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Old 21st March 2010, 18:00   #822
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@ khoj

Thanks for that very informative post. As you say, the back of the unit is at a slight incline when compared to the front, and the stabilizer is not fixed permanently. The technician removes it before taking the unit down, but I would still relocate it anyway!

Just one question about the split unit. For a similar sized window and split units, does the split consume more power? I liked the aesthetics of the split more, but was loath to make a hole in the wall while a simple install facility existed in the window. And the price difference of ~ 5K was an icing on the cake!

I am worried about what you say about the household cleaner. He did use something, I thought it was colin. Should I wash it again in plain water to be sure?

Last edited by Gansan : 21st March 2010 at 18:01.
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Old 21st March 2010, 19:44   #823
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Hey Gansan,

The split will consume less power, even though it is running two fan motors compared to one in the window, the main power consumer i.e the compressor consumes much less power due to better temperature control and a much better heat exchange rate.

Another team member 'SoulGarage' has posted very useful data in post #807 it is a tabulated compilation of power consumptions by air cons differentiated by type(separate excel sheets) then tonnage and finally brands.

As for the last wash, do not lose sleep over it, just avoid caustics from now on. The reaction is not instantaneous and will show the effects only after repeated usage of household cleaners.

Regarding the choice of air con do not rule out the window straight away. Value of money saved today is always higher than value of money that will be saved tomorrow. Apart from the extra money upfront you will have to factor in the cost of installation (material + labour) and then play it against the money that you will save on power. Just because technology has moved on all of us do not have to follow suit immediately. There are so many other factors at play, for example I am eagerly looking forward to bring home a vehicle that was introduced nearly 3 years ago even though newer examples are available in the same price range and with more efficient engines.

Last edited by khoj : 21st March 2010 at 19:48.
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Old 21st March 2010, 23:34   #824
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
I walked into the near by Sears, picked up a Window AC and brought it home in my Acura sedan. I opened the box, pulled out the AC. Then I opened the window half way up, lifted the AC into the window, while holding/balancing the AC on the window sill in one hand, I brought the window down in the other to lock the AC in place. I closed the gap on both sides using the collapsible shutter given along with the AC unit. Then I connected the power, and it started working. I installed AC for the first time in my life, taking only 10 minutes. I must have spent more time reading the manual.

Why can't this happen in India? Simple, there is no standardization in either windows or AC units in India. So we are dependent on technician to do what can be the simplest of jobs.
America is DIY country because manual labour is exorbitant and impractical unless one's filthy rich. Of course, this makes people independent. I like that aspect.

In India, we have "skilled" labour who'll work for $1 per hour (calculated from monthly earnings). So, we don't bother to DIY.
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Old 22nd March 2010, 02:12   #825
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This may stray OT but DIY is any day better. Read the manual understand the product and the get it up and running. Ac / Car / PC whatever. And you will understand the products better too after reading the manual.

If you call a cheap fellow to install it chances are you will have to call a expensive fellow to service it later.

This is our Inidaness here call everyone - to Install for Demo and all else in between.
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