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Old 4th July 2007, 16:05   #16
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I suggest following the link:

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/indian...bious-car.html
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Old 27th September 2007, 18:10   #17
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Default How do you identify a car which has been flooded in monsoons

I was wondering if one is thinking of buying a second hand car,how do you identify whether the car was in a flood.I had heard that 2 years back after the floods in Mumbai a lot of premium segment cars were being sold at rates less than the markey value mainly because they were flooded in the monsoon.Basically I am looking for tips to identify so that you dont end up buying such a car which could later cause you problems.
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Old 28th September 2007, 16:24   #18
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Originally Posted by fergus View Post
I was wondering if one is thinking of buying a second hand car,how do you identify whether the car was in a flood.I had heard that 2 years back after the floods in Mumbai a lot of premium segment cars were being sold at rates less than the markey value mainly because they were flooded in the monsoon.Basically I am looking for tips to identify so that you dont end up buying such a car which could later cause you problems.
Inspect the car under bright sunlight for optimum visibility. After leaving the car parked under the sun for a few minutes with all the windows rolled up, get back in the car and see if you can detect any musty or stale smell that usually comes from excessive moisture in the interiors. No amount of cleaning and shampooing will rid a car's seats of the smell of bad water, which would have flowed in if the car has been flooded up to and over the floorboards.
Also check if the seat upholstery is unusually new and clean, which could then be an indicator that after market seat covers were in use before and have since been removed. While under normal circumstances this may be indicative of a caring previous owner, if the car has seen flood damage, then the removal of old seat covers could indicate an attempt at a cover-up.
Inspect difficult to reach and oft neglected areas of the car for signs of dirt, mud deposition which the dealer or previous owner may have overlooked when cleaning the car. These spots could include the door hinges, the inner corners of the boot, the area under the rear seat (which can be checked by folding the bench forward), the floor of the car under the carpet (if accessible) and in the crevices of the engine bay.
Other parts and points in the car that you may check to verify if they have been recently replaced include the fuse box, which is usually installed on the wall in the engine bay directly behind the dashboard. Check to see if all the fuses are new or recently replaced. Check to verify if the insulation panels in the engine bay have been replaced or are showing signs of water logging if they are old.
Carefully slide your fingers under the front bumper and feel the underside for excessive accumulation of dirt and mud. Even a brand new air filter or radiator could be suspect, unless all the other indicators turn up negative for flood damage. Remember, these are meant to be self-help points, but may not be an exhaustive, foolproof list. Your best bet could eventually be trying to locate a used car from a local dealer of repute who can certify the car, and in addition carry out an inspection on the lines above.

Courtsey: The Hindu Business Line : Beware buying used cars during floods
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Old 28th September 2007, 19:40   #19
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Also check the odometer.Is the colour same on all the numbers??if it is not then 99% of the time it was submerged and 1% there was a fire in the car.
Okay i m talking from personal expirience here.My car seat had got caught fire once overnight with all the windows closed and in the morning the entire interior was yellow because of the dunlop and so was the odometer yellow and no amount of cleaning could do anything to it.
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Old 28th September 2007, 20:00   #20
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i dont think the R&D department in any of the above mentioned companies are so reduntant that they actually make cars which are succeptable to monsoon damage.

diesels being hard to run on rainy days are a thing of the past. if anything i think the diesel counterparts are starting to over shadows their petro-performers.
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Old 28th September 2007, 20:13   #21
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Originally Posted by flipsyde View Post
diesels being hard to run on rainy days are a thing of the past. if anything i think the diesel counterparts are starting to over shadows their petro-performers.
Is that right? That diesels were harder to run on rainy days? I grew up seeing quite the opposite. Could you please elaborate on how you meant that?
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Old 26th April 2008, 11:04   #22
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Originally Posted by shapath View Post
Among these four which (used) car is better to drive in rainy period .
mostly 2 will be in the car . im looking for SAFE driving during rainy days .
Thanks.
Safe driving in the rainy season is more attributed to driving skill. Any car you buy hi tech or low tech - you can only push it within the limits of your driving skill and within the vehicles engineering limits. Only difference in a hi-tech car i feel is that all the extra tech makes a relatively inexperienced driver drive safely.
Also, if your driving inside the city at crawling speeds in the monsoon, then any car which doesnt leak and doesnt stall has decent ice to keep you entertained should be good enough. If its more highway driving in the rains then you car better be equiped to withstand highway monsoon craters too.
For that may I recommend an suv = safari. HAHAHAHAHA
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