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Old 20th February 2013, 09:20   #3676
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Car: Tata manza QJD (2010 model)
Mileage: 15.8 to 16.1 km/l
Driving pattern: 50-50 city:highway

Both tank full method and MID shows same average.

I have no idea how people manage to get more than 18km/l on a Manza. I drive sedately and seldom crosses 2.5k rpm and always up shift at around 1.8k rpm. But in bumper to bumper cochin traffic, do ride on clutch (just one third clutch, no brake, no accelerator) in 1st gear. I know it will burn my clutch fast, but don't know how to avoid it. If I relase the clutch, my car will smash the car in front of me. Any suggestions on this and mileage.
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Old 20th February 2013, 11:22   #3677
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreerknair View Post
I have no idea how people manage to get more than 18km/l on a Manza. I drive sedately and seldom crosses 2.5k rpm and always up shift at around 1.8k rpm.
The question which you also need to check is how much is AC usage in the car.
You need to take that account into equation. That might be also the difference.
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Old 20th February 2013, 11:57   #3678
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The question which you also need to check is how much is AC usage in the car.
You need to take that account into equation. That might be also the difference.
Hey ampere, well I use AC most of the time. So it is 100%. But I have seen our forum members mentioning 18-20km/l even with AC.
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Old 20th February 2013, 16:57   #3679
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Default Re: What is your Actual Fuel Efficiency?

The lower your speed, the higher the FE drop. The reason is that AC in general consumes same fuel per hour. So if you travel less per hour (B2B traffic), the most of the fuel will be used up by the AC, while if you are on a highway, depending on the engine size the contribution of Ac will be between 0.5 and 2 km/l (the lower figure for high power cars and the higher figures for low power cars)
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Old 20th February 2013, 21:59   #3680
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The below excel chart shows how the fuel efficiency of my i-gen i20 petrol has risen from 9.5 kmpl to a consistent 13.8 to 14.2 kmpl in city

Apart from daily drive from malviya nagar, south Delhi to Noida Sec 2 via DND the car is driven on small weekend trips .
Climate Control temp setting has a considerable impact on city FE
Attached Thumbnails
What is your Actual Fuel Efficiency?-untitled.png  

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Old 21st February 2013, 15:00   #3681
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Stumbled upon a article about fuel saving with different driving practices.
The article is purely on the outside market vehicles. All the consumptions and readings are in miles and gallons.
The article is worth reading and the tips given in this article might help us to pump out some good fuel efficiency from our cars.
Enjoy reading....



What Really Saves Fuel? And How Much?
- by Philip Reed, Senior Consumer Advice Editor Philip Reed, Senior Consumer Advice Editor
Both the Volvo S40 and the BMW X3 have computerized fuel gauges which allowed us to study how gas mileage varies under different conditions. | | Philip Reed, Senior Consumer Advice Editor




With gas prices so high, the media is awash with lists of gas-saving tips. Well how's this for a tip? If you listen to us, you can see hybrid-type savings without having to buy a new car.
By changing your driving habits you can improve fuel economy up to 37 percent right away (depending on how you drive). Combine several tips and perform routine maintenance and you will save real dollars, not just pennies.
A miracle? All we did was take several of the most common tips out there and put them to the test over a remote 55-mile route in the high desert of California. Some of them worked like a charm. Some of them didn't work at all. We'll give you the breakdown.
These tests were done under real-world conditions not in a government lab somewhere. Our results can be matched by anyone even you.
The wonderful part about what we found is that improving your car's mileage is just a matter of changing your habits. Stack a few of these winners together and we'll bet that you'll see a substantial savings at the pump without the need for a new car.


Test #1 Aggressive Driving vs. Moderate Driving
Result: Major savings potential
The Cold Hard Facts: Up to 37 percent savings, average savings of 31 percent
Recommendation: Stop driving like a maniac.


Test #2 Lower Speeds Saves Gas
Result: Substantial savings on a long trip
Cold Hard Facts: Up to 14 percent savings, average savings of 12 percent
Recommendation: Drive the speed limit.

Test #3 Use Cruise Control
Result: Surprisingly effective way to save gas
Cold Hard Facts: Up to 14-percent savings, average savings of 7 percent
Recommendation: If you've got it, use it.


Test #4 A/C On, Windows Up vs. A/C Off, Windows Down
Result: Nice in theory; not true in practice
Cold Hard Facts: No measurable difference (unless you open the sunroof, too!)
Recommendation: Please, make yourself comfortable.


Test #5 Check Your Tire Pressure
Result: Important for safety and to reduce tire wear
Cold Hard Facts: No measurable effect on the vehicles we tested
Recommendation: Check your tire pressure often but don't expect a big savings.


Test #6 Avoid Excessive Idling
Result: More important than we assumed
Cold Hard Facts: Avoiding excessive idling can save up to 19 percent
Recommendation: Stopping longer than a minute? Shut 'er down.


The Tests:
Our results are based on two separate fuel testing sessions. On each occasion we took two cars from the Edmunds.com long-term fleet and drove on a 56-mile test loop. Our route circled Owens Lake near Lone Pine, California, at the foot of Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain in the lower 48 states. We chose the route because it was so deserted we could vary our speed and driving style without interfering with the flow of traffic. The only other cars we saw on the route were a caravan of test vehicles from Mercedes-Benz. We drove the loops back-to-back to ensure that we were comparing similar wind and temperatures. We logged our results and later put them on a spreadsheet where the results were averaged.


Test #1: Aggressive vs. Moderate Driving
This is gonna hurt. Our tests showed that the most significant way to save gas is: you. And we're talking massive fuel economy gains. Think you need a hybrid? Chances are you've got hybrid-style mileage in your gas pedal foot. Don't mash the gas when you start up. Take the long view of the road and brake easy. This tip alone can save you unbelievable amounts of gas. If you slowed your 0-to-60-mph acceleration time down from your current 10 seconds to a more normal city pace of 15 seconds, you'll feel the savings immediately.


Method: We conducted this test four times. The first time we did the full 55-mile loop once by accelerating aggressively 15 times at 3/4-throttle from zero to a cruising speed of 75 mph. We also applied the brakes hard to come to a full stop. Then, we drove the second loop by accelerating moderately 15 times at 1/4-throttle to a cruising speed of 70 mph. We braked lightly to a full stop. In the second set of tests we drove 25 miles making 25 rapid accelerations to 65 mph at 3/4-throttle. After 1 minute of cruising we braked hard and repeated the cycle up to 65 mph. We then drove the same distance making 25 moderation accelerations to 60 mph at 1/4-throttle. After 1 minute of cruising we applied the brakes easily and came to a full stop.


Test #2 Lower Speeds Saves Gas
Remember a thing called the speed limit? On most highways it is either 65 or 70 mph. How fast are the cars and trucks around you going? From 75 mph to 90 mph. These people are wasting a lot of gas for the chance to get there a little earlier. Factor in safety concerns and a speeding ticket once or twice a year and going fast is a costly proposition.


Method: This test was simple. For 50 miles we drove with the cruise control set at 65 mph. Then, for another 50-mile stretch we drove with cruise set at 75 mph. We repeated this test going in the opposite direction. It is amazing how obvious the difference in gas mileage was. Just think what would have happened if we had slowed down to 60 mph. The only problem is with impatient drivers behind you. One driver became so irate that he tried to run our editor off the road. Still, if you are pinched by gas prices. Leave a little early and drive the speed limit (in the slow lane).


Test #3 Use Cruise Control
Using cruise control is a bit of gas-saving advice frequently on tips lists. We have always agreed with this tip in theory but we hadn't expected such significant results. First, it smoothes out the driver's accelerator input by preventing nervous "surging." Second, it makes the driver take the long view of the road rather than reacting to every change in the traffic around them.


Method: We did this test twice with four different cars each time driving the 55-mile loop. The first time we set cruise control to 70 mph. The second time, with the cruise control off, we varied our speed between 65 mph and 75 mph. We tried to mimic the driving style of a person who is in moderate freeway traffic.
One thing that's important to note: if you are in a mountainous area you should turn off cruise. It will try to keep you up to the speed you've set and will use a lot of extra gas downshifting to lower gears to accomplish this.


Test #4 A/C On, Windows Up vs. A/C Off, Windows Down
This has got to take you back to the days with the family on vacation. Dad says, "Turn the A/C off! It wastes gas!" And Mom says, "We can't roll the windows down or everyone on the highway will think we can't afford A/C." And you're in the back roasting, hoping someone will win the argument so you can cool off.
Well, family psychology aside, if dads are still saying this, they aren't necessarily right. While the A/C compressor does pull power from the engine wasting some gas, the effect appears to be fairly minimal in modern cars. And putting the windows down tends to increase drag on most cars, canceling out any measurable gain from turning the A/C off. But this one depends on the model you're driving. When we opened the sunroof in our SUV, the mileage did decrease even with the A/C off. Still, in our experience, it's not worth the argument because you won't save a lot of gas either way. So just do what's comfortable.


Method: We drove the full 55 mile-loop in two cars at equal speeds both times 65 mph. The first loop we drove with the A/C on and the windows up. The second loop we drove with the A/C off and windows down. In the second test we drove 20-mile loops. This was far enough to see our gas mileage level off and remain steady on the computer trip meter.


Test #5: Check Your Tire Pressure
No matter how many times drivers hear about the importance of tire pressure, most of them don't do anything about it. They probably don't like squatting beside their car in a busy gas station with fumes swirling around them. But is it important? The answer is yes, for a number of reasons. Properly inflated tires are less likely to fail at high speeds. They wear more evenly and, yes, they deliver better gas mileage. How much? In this test we saw a modest difference in two of the cars. It might have been more dramatic with different tires on different cars. Experts swear by it; we couldn't really document it. And we wound up wondering if tire technology, like the design in other areas of the car, had improved.
Eventually, we concluded that each set of tires is different and every vehicle is different. We recommend that you do your own tests to see what inflation setting gives you the best fuel economy.


Method: We drove the 55-mile test loop four times at 60 mph twice with tires at or above proper inflation. Once, we did the test with the tires 5 psi below the pressure recommended by the manufacturer. Since this produced very little difference we enlarged the gap and under inflated the tires by 8 psi. We felt that it was important to make sure the tires were inflated to the recommended level or above.


Test #6 Avoid Excessive Idling
If you turn off a light bulb as you leave the room you'll save electricity. If you turn off your car you will save gas. Obviously. But related questions are more difficult to answer. If you're only stopping for only a minute, is it better to shut off the engine or keep it idling? Should I shut off the engine in traffic? How much gas will this save? What rule of thumb do I use when trying to save gas this way?


Method: We took two cars and drove a 10-mile route stopping 10 times for two minutes. We shut down the car each time. Then we drove the same route at the same speed and let the car idle for two minutes.


Conclusions
The good news is that you can drastically improve your gas mileage. The caveat is that you have to change your driving habits. If you are willing to change, you'll find many related benefits too: no speeding tickets, greater safety, reduced stress and lower repair bills for tires and brake pads. In the long run this will save you money. And who knows? You might like the new you

Last edited by sujay bhandare : 21st February 2013 at 15:09.
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Old 21st February 2013, 15:29   #3682
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Default Re: What is your Actual Fuel Efficiency?

Hyundai i10 1.2

City mileage : 13.5-14 kmpl (Without AC)
City driving consists of driving through notorious Hinjewadi traffic.

Topped once at Shell petrol pump and was amazed to see approximately 17kmpl on highway.
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Old 21st February 2013, 18:50   #3683
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Originally Posted by thoma View Post
Excellent FE. What does the MID show? Are you using ordinary diesel? Do you drive for economy? RPM ranges (gear shifts), A/C usage and tire pressure please. 80-90 kmph means 2000 to 2200 RPM in 5th gear, right? Were you babying the car while running-in? Was this FE consistent from the time you bought the car or did it increase after any service?

This is what I got from my first full tank on the Micra Diesel. 31 liters + an additional 10 liters filled in between. A total of 870 kms, of which 300 was on the ghats (not the hairpin type), 300 on the highway and the rest inside the city. Not too much bumper to bumper traffic. Speeds less than 80 and RPM strictly below 2500 for the running-in. A/C being on almost all the time.

Attachment 1053615

The calculated FE comes to 21.2 kmpl and the MID is not much off-value.
The MID usually shows 10% more than the actual average...I use normal diesel...I usually upshift at around 1800-1900 RPM which is possible coz of nil turbo lag...This avg. is consistent and without ac...Tire pressure I keep 32...
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Old 21st February 2013, 19:35   #3684
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These figures I am quoting after Sid massaged my Cruze with output of 193bhp at 3300rpm and 390Nm torque at 2200rpm. He de-tuned it three weeks ago after I had driven around for 30000km with the first remap of Sid; since he felt that the engine could not take the higher output of the more aggressive map which was 197 and about 393 with specific regard to EGT. Aggressive driving with higher EGT is a recipe for turbo failure. I am not an aggressive driver though, gleaned from the fact that first set of brake pads were changed only after 52500km with enough pad material to reach the 60000km mark.

There is variation with the diesel I use traveling 108km every day with A/C on full time changing gears at 2300rpm to the next higher gear and shifting down to lower gear at 1200rpm. Turbo lag is there till 1280rpm.

With HP diesel I consistently get 14.2kmpl on the congested state highway where speeds can never exceed 100kmph and most often traveling at an average of 60kmph in fourth gear rarely getting an opportunity to engage fifth gear.

On the same roads with Indian oil diesel I get 14.8kmpl

However hard I have tried even when the company map was there for 12000km's I never could cross the 15kmpl figures in congested Kerala state highway roads. Company map never gave me more than 13.8kmpl. Have not traveled on four lane roads for more than 140km's so cannot tell how much it will give on four lane roads in the tank full to tank full method.
Have not tried BP diesel in the full tank to full tank method so cannot comment on Bharath Petroleum.

I am stunned at the figures that majority of Renault Pulse owners are getting in the city of about 23kmpl in congested Kochi city roads with A/C on all the time, the price of the car puts me off as regards a second car to complement the Cruze.

Last edited by drpullockaran : 21st February 2013 at 19:44.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 08:26   #3685
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Just calculated the mileage for my alto and over the last 6,000 or so km it has given me an average of around 17. Includes city driving, highway driving, some hard acceleration at safe places, ac maybe 25 to 50% and occasionally windows down thanks to our wonderful no tints policy. Car was better with tints as ac used less and windows down not needed as much. Worst of 13.7 and best of 20.6. So yes, your driving style does matter. Even more so at 77.85 a litre here in Bangalore
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Old 3rd March 2013, 17:52   #3686
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The average FE reading on MID is since the last reset or for recent limited KMs, say last 50 KM or last 100 KM? Any idea?
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Old 3rd March 2013, 22:40   #3687
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Originally Posted by anujatwork View Post
The average FE reading on MID is since the last reset or for recent limited KMs, say last 50 KM or last 100 KM? Any idea?
This depends on the car. For my Quanto it is the average over the last 30kms.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 22:45   #3688
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Car: WagonR 2010 (K-Series)
Mileage: 13 kmpl with AC on full time , 14.5 kmpl with intermittent AC.
Driving pattern: 100% city driving on Pune roads

Of late I have been driving very sedately, accelerating gently and using brakes very smoothly. I have noticed a kmpl increase of 1-2 kms with this style. I still reach my destination at the same time so no 'need for speed' from me from now on.
My Waggy beats City's and Civics when the traffic light goes green. It takes 100-200 metres before they catch me. I love my Suzuki.
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Old 3rd March 2013, 23:09   #3689
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Ertiga ZDi, run 12800kms.
City- 15 to 15.5kmpl. (Considering BLR traffic, this avg is not bad)
Highway- 18-18.5kmpl.
Both figures with AC on throughout.
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Old 4th March 2013, 22:11   #3690
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Originally Posted by deep_bang View Post
This depends on the car. For my Quanto it is the average over the last 30kms.
Where can I figure this out pls? Rather, where did you figure this out for Quanto? Perhaps I can look up the same place for my Corolla 1.8G (P).
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