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Old 27th February 2008, 12:35   #1
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Default What are the Pros & Cons of A Tilt Steering?

Hi BHPians,

I would like to know more about the pros and cons of the latest additions in most of the Indian vehicles now, THE TILT STEERING.

How much advantageous is this feature?

Is this feature in the car when changed often will result in a malfunction or stability of the steering column?

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Old 27th February 2008, 13:54   #2
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Hi Bharath,

The tilt steering is a boon especially when you go on a long drive and are cruising. You can move the steering lower than normal and then rest you hand on the window or on the centre console.

Also, in some cars, the ingress (way in) is difficult for tall people as the seats are relatively lower. For example, Maruti Esteem or a Honda City seat is lower compared to a Wagon R and hence when you try and get in or get out, you find your leg hitting the steering wheel. In such cases, the tilt steering helps so that you riase it fully and move in or out comfortably. This ofcourse depends on the height of the person.

I have never heard of any mafunction or instability because of using this feature often. Just make sure the sterring is locked in properly. You dont want it to be moving up or down when you are driving at high speeds
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Old 28th February 2008, 01:47   #3
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In most cases this is just like the seat adjustment, once done, if your car is yours only, stays that way.

Say for example, a Tata Indica, one has to adjust to the weird steering position rather than the steering adjust to my suitability. Ikon too had a fixed steering to which the non-enthusiasts would complain for being too low.

Interesting is, Memory seating, some of my colleagues (who have this option), set up two different seat/steering positions for driving and entry-exit. They simply press the respective memory button, the seat and steering moves out of the way for exit, while entry, they just sit and press the other memory button for the seats/steering to come back to driving position.

Apart from Tilt, there is also the option of Telescoping the steering column.
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Old 28th February 2008, 02:06   #4
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Can't think of a negative side to this feature. I'd love to have it on any car, to find the perfect ergo combo.

But I do remember taking a corner at 3 digit speeds on track and knocking the lock loose on a Lancer, suddenly the steering wheel is moving up and down in my hands!
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Old 28th February 2008, 02:09   #5
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I was going to talk about the aspect of 'telescopic' steering. Both my cars have it,and its such a versatile feature to have. As is the case with any car,once you get used to a certain steering position,you stick with that always.

Tilt steering is a wonderful feature to have,giving you the choice of having the steering low,or raised. Combined with the telescopic function,you can minimize strain on the back & neck especially on long drives. Not a big deal on US roads,where you move the steering minimally on the freeways,but driving in India is a totally different thing. This feature really makes a big difference.
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Old 28th February 2008, 05:52   #6
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Default Joy stick

The "Joy Stick" concept has been experimented with from time to time but has never made it into mass production as far as I know. This is a single stick just like a fighter aircraft or a computer game. Ordinary people are not coordinated enough to leave the wheel behind and use a stick. Also there is a safety factor concerning the effect of children and pets. Different variations of it include also using it as a brake and throttle. This was disaster, ordinary drivers could not handle it. Other versions were tested that just used it as a steering device also have failed to catch on. As you might guess, road feed back, getting the feel of where the car is going, is a problem with a joy stick.

"Tilt wheel" is old, old technology. If it is designed and manufactured correctly there are no problems with it even if you change the wheel position while in motion (if you are careful).
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Old 28th February 2008, 08:51   #7
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Just thought of posting a pic of a Joystick concept by SAAB. Looks difficult to drive! Give me a good old steering wheel anytime!

Article here - Link

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Old 28th February 2008, 09:05   #8
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google for "steer by wire"
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Old 28th February 2008, 09:58   #9
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There is a specific benefit to Tilt Steerings. To optimise your seating posture and ability to handle the steering it is recommended that with your back against the seat you must stretch your arms straight ahead and rest them palm down on the top of the steering. The point at which the steering touches your hand should be the wrist joint. This is the correct distance of a steering top away from your chest. With the seat back adjustment and tilt you usually can get this set.

This setting is recommended so your arms have just the right amount of space to enable a full range of manuevres required suddenly in a tight spot.

The tilt function, and the telescopic function, specifically aid in setting the optimum driving posture.

Further, the correct position to hold a steering is at the 10:10 clock position. The correct procedure in turning steerings is also never to cross the 12 o'clock position with either arm. Reason why they recommend this is you can end up locking your arms beyond a point. You have to use a series of left and right pulls to turn a steering.

PS No adjustments should be made while driving, This is a safety precaution

Last edited by DKG : 28th February 2008 at 09:59.
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Old 28th February 2008, 10:28   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG View Post
There is a specific benefit to Tilt Steerings. To optimise your seating posture and ability to handle the steering it is recommended that with your back against the seat you must stretch your arms straight ahead and rest them palm down on the top of the steering. The point at which the steering touches your hand should be the wrist joint. This is the correct distance of a steering top away from your chest. With the seat back adjustment and tilt you usually can get this set.

This setting is recommended so your arms have just the right amount of space to enable a full range of manuevres required suddenly in a tight spot.

The tilt function, and the telescopic function, specifically aid in setting the optimum driving posture.

Further, the correct position to hold a steering is at the 10:10 clock position. The correct procedure in turning steerings is also never to cross the 12 o'clock position with either arm. Reason why they recommend this is you can end up locking your arms beyond a point. You have to use a series of left and right pulls to turn a steering.

PS No adjustments should be made while driving, This is a safety precaution
And after about two hours on the road everybody gets tired and the calculator and "the book" go out the window.
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Old 28th February 2008, 10:29   #11
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In my brother's S-Type Jag, the steering automatically moves into the driver's programmed position when the doors are closed and moves away again when the ignition is turned off.

First time my sister-in-law saw it happening, she freaked! :-) Probably thought it was one of the Transformers!
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Old 28th February 2008, 22:31   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG View Post
There is a specific benefit to Tilt Steerings. To optimise your seating posture and ability to handle the steering it is recommended that with your back against the seat you must stretch your arms straight ahead and rest them palm down on the top of the steering. The point at which the steering touches your hand should be the wrist joint. This is the correct distance of a steering top away from your chest. With the seat back adjustment and tilt you usually can get this set.

This setting is recommended so your arms have just the right amount of space to enable a full range of manuevres required suddenly in a tight spot.

The tilt function, and the telescopic function, specifically aid in setting the optimum driving posture.

Further, the correct position to hold a steering is at the 10:10 clock position. The correct procedure in turning steerings is also never to cross the 12 o'clock position with either arm. Reason why they recommend this is you can end up locking your arms beyond a point. You have to use a series of left and right pulls to turn a steering.

PS No adjustments should be made while driving, This is a safety precaution

well explained DKG, and futher more to add to this, at least as far as what i have seen in my car viva crdi, a person with average height say 5.5"-5.8" will need to lower the steering to get the best posture.

where as the person who is tall cannot drive with the steering any low as this will limit the movements of the legs, and touches the thighs, so the tilt steering is indeed has pros no cons!

in short it provides correct posture to a person according to the size of the person driving! there are also additional seat height adjustments in a few vehicles such as accent crdi!, skoda superb etc!

if i remember correctly i think i first saw it in tata estate!

Last edited by rider60 : 28th February 2008 at 22:34.
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Old 28th February 2008, 22:52   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG View Post
The correct procedure in turning steerings is also never to cross the 12 o'clock position with either arm. Reason why they recommend this is you can end up locking your arms beyond a point.
Yes they recommend that in the UK. However I find it rather clumsy to obey and feels like I am juggling. Moreover there is always a transition (for a split second) where either arm transfers the turning duty to the other arm, without there being an overlap.

I had shown a UK instructor the way we do it in India with the arms crossing at the 12 o clock position and each hand takes it from 10 to 2 (or reverse), without ever fumbling. He was impressed. Told him, we are used to a phenomenon called Amby which was actually your own doing.

US instructors though, agree to the way we do it.
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Old 29th February 2008, 00:35   #14
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And if I might add,
the geometry of the human shoulder, elbow and wrist joints being the way it is, the driving seat position (distance between the seat squab and the steering wheel) is considered just right, when:
the bottoms of your wrists just touch the top of the steering wheel rim, with both arms outstretched.

Let me explain with a diagram.



Of course, with a tilt-wheel, a slight adjustment may also be made by unlocking, tilting and relocking the steering wheel, to achieve this wrist-wheel fit.

Ram
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Old 29th February 2008, 04:27   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram View Post
And if I might add,
the geometry of the human shoulder, elbow and wrist joints being the way it is, the driving seat position (distance between the seat squab and the steering wheel) is considered just right, when:
the bottoms of your wrists just touch the top of the steering wheel rim, with both arms outstretched.
This is very logical, otherwise it will be difficult to turn thru the 12'o clock point.

But what I see in US is cars driving by themselves without a driver. Only on deeper inspection I get to see a head midway through the rear window one arm grabbing the top of the wheel and the otherone on the center armrest. Who popularised this driving style?
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