Go Back   Team-BHP > BHP Worldwide > The International Automotive Scene


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 17th September 2008, 23:32   #166
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default

September 18, 1904
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Glidden completed the first crossing of the Canadian Rockies by automobile on this day, arriving exhausted from their 3,536-mile trip. The couple had driven from Boston, Massachusetts, to Vancouver, Canada, in their 24hp Napier.

September 18, 1955
The Ford Motor Company produced its 2,000,000th V-8 engine on this day, 23 years after the first Ford V-8 was manufactured. The popularity of the V-8 engine began in the late 1940s, when the engines of the time failed to satisfy the industry trend toward increased horsepower, experiencing vibration and size problems at the high pressures that accompany high horsepower. Engineers began developing a stiff, V-shaped configuration to combat the new problems, and the V-8 became the preferred choice for auto manufacturers. Trends began to reverse somewhat during the late 1960s with the advent of smaller cars, and four and six cylinder engines began to gain on the popularity of the V-8.

September 18, 2006
Ford bought rights to Rover name from BMW for approximately £6 million. Ironically no Rover branded cars were produced whilst Ford owned the brand. As part of Ford's agreement to sell their Jaguar & Land Rover operations early this year to Tata Motors, the Rover brand name was included in the deal.

Charles Glidden & his wife Lucy Gidden on their 24hp Napier.
Name:  gidden couple.jpg
Views: 5021
Size:  28.7 KB


Source:
The History Channel

Wikipedia
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th September 2008, 21:05   #167
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 19th September

September 19, 1887
Dr. Graham Edgar, developer of the octane rating system, was born in Fayetteville, Arkansas, on this day. Although he may not be a household name, evidence of Edgar's work lines every highway in America. His rating system measures a fuel's ability to resist any form of abnormal combustion, in other words, its ability to burn cleanly. Eighty-eight and 90 are the normal ratings for everyday unleaded gasoline, while racing gasoline will often have a rating as high as 115. Almost every gas pump in America sports an octane rating sticker.


September 19, 1919
Wary of the unpopularity of "German-sounding" names after World War I, August Beuck began using the name Buick rather than Beuck for the first time when he christened the new post office in his Colorado hometown. The new name of the General Motors marque seemed assuredly all-American in a time when anti-German feelings dominated the nation. The wave of intolerance had begun with the United States entrance into World War I, resulting in many a Schmidt becoming a Smith. Throughout the country, hundreds of German newspapers and publications were forced to shut down, and German language instruction came to an end in most states.

September 19, 1932
The Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah have been the site of dozens of world speed records, but Ab Jenkins set a new kind of record in Bonneville on this day. Jenkins completed the first 24-hour solo run, driving 2,710 miles nonstop in a single day. His stock Pierce Arrow V-12 averaged 112.94mph.

Ab Jenkins beside Mormon Meteor 3
Name:  ab.jpg
Views: 10489
Size:  38.3 KB

Source:
The History Channel

Wikipedia
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th September 2008, 22:00   #168
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 20th September

September 20, 1945
War production halts. Automotive manufacturers had been at the heart of a seamless war machine during World War II, producing trucks, tanks, and planes at astounding rates. But only after the last shots were fired did auto factories begin to produce cars again, focusing their sights on the booming postwar market. A month after the surrender of Japan, Packard followed the lead of every other company and ceased military production, turning out its last wartime Rolls-Royce Merlin engine on this day.

September 20, 1979
Legendary Lee Iacocca makes a comeback. After being fired from the Ford presidency, he was elected chairman of the failing Chrysler Corporation. Despite dire predictions from his critics, Iacocca succeeded in rebuilding Chrysler through layoffs, cutbacks, hard-selling advertising, and a government loan guarantee. He became the epitome of the "can-do" executive, famous for his strong work ethic and no-nonsense style. During Chrysler's crisis years, Iacocca reduced his salary to $1 per year to set an example for the rest of the company, explaining that everyone must be willing to sacrifice a little in order for Chrysler to survive. By 1983, Chrysler had moved from the verge of bankruptcy to a competitive force in the automobile market, paying back all of its government loans in less than four years. His autobiography Iacocca became a best-seller in 1984, breaking all records for a business book, which accounts all of his such ventures.

September 20, 1984
Twelve people were killed on this day when a suicide car bomber attacked the U.S. embassy complex in Beirut, Lebanon. Car bombs have started to become the weapon of choice for terrorists from early 80s.. But car bombs has been used as early as 1920s. The car bomb method has sadly proven an effective way of achieving mass destruction, as it is much easier for a terrorist to find a parking space than bypass a building's internal security. From Beirut to Oklahoma City, entire buildings have been destroyed from car bomb blasts, and countless lives have been lost. Among the most noted in recent times were the dual U.S. embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania, where two car bombs killed 257 people, and reduced several buildings to rubble. Similar setup has been used extensively by insurgents in Iraq.
Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mass_car_bombings
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st September 2008, 19:49   #169
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 21st September

September 21, 1921
The first Bentley was sold to Noel van Raalte, wealthy and influential playboy racecar driver.

September 21, 1945
Henry Ford II, grandson and namesake of Henry Ford, succeeded his father as president of the Ford Motor Company on this day, inheriting a company that was losing money at the rate of several million dollars a month. After recovering from the shock of his father's unexpected death, Henry Ford II was effectively given a crash course in management, but fortunately for the company, he turned out to have the magic touch. He quickly set about reorganizing and modernizing the Ford Motor Company, firing the powerful Personnel Chief Harry Bennett, whose strong-arm tactics and anti-union stance had made Ford notorious for its bad labor relations. He also brought in new talent, including a group of former U.S. Air Force intelligence officers, among them Robert McNamara, who became known as the "Whiz Kids." During his tenure as president, Henry Ford II nursed the Ford Motor Company back to health, greatly expanding its international operations and introducing two classic models, the Mustang and the Thunderbird.

September 21, 1947
The Grand Prix returns after the World War II. Driving his Talbot-Lago across the finish line in Lyon-Parilly, Louis Chrion emerged victorious at the French Grand Prix of 1947. The race was a continuation of the Grand Prix's long history and France's first major post-World War II race. The event had been suspended for several years during the war, along with almost all other car racing. In a side note, the Albert Lory designed CTA-Arsenal made a disgraceful debut at the Grand Prix that year, and was never raced again.

September 21, 1959
No-name Plymouth produced in Michigan. The first Plymouth Valiant was produced on this day at a plant in Hamtramck, Michigan, although it was not known by that name until 1961. Originally code named "Falcon" after the 1955 Chrysler Falcon, plans for the new model went awry when the Chrysler marketing team found out at the last minute that Ford had already registered the name "Falcon" for its compact car. The news resulted in a wild scramble, for the logo castings had already been made and marketing plans finalized. A company-wide contest was held for a new name, and "Valiant" emerged the winner. However, there was no time to make new logo castings, so the car was simply introduced as the Valiant, featuring only a mylar sticker on the engine for identification. It wasn't until 1961 that the Valiant became the Plymouth Valiant, new logo castings and all.

1962 Plymouth Valiant
Name:  19601962plymouthvaliant7.jpg
Views: 6212
Size:  31.1 KB

Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia

SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st September 2008, 20:01   #170
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 22nd September

September 22, 1893
America's first automobile was not built by a Henry Ford or Walter Chrysler, but by Charles and Frank Duryea, two bicycle makers. Charles spotted a gasoline engine at the 1886 Ohio State Fair and became convinced that an engine-driven carriage could be built. The two brothers designed and built the car together, working in a rented loft in Springfield, Massachusetts. After two years of tinkering, Charles and Frank Duryea showed off their home invention on the streets of Springfield, the first successful run of an automobile in the U.S.

September 22, 1953
The world's first four-level interchange structure, was opened on this day in L.A. Los Angeles is widely known for its traffic and smog, miles of freeway stretching in every direction. The massive concrete structure connected the freeways of Hollywood, Harbor, Santa Ana, and Arroyo Seco.

September 22, 1989
Chrysler sells interest in Mitsubishi. In a move that sent ripples throughout the automotive world, the Chrysler Corporation sold 50 percent of its interest in the Mitsubishi Motors Corporation. The decision came at a time when most other American automobile manufacturers, including Chrysler's top rivals Ford and General Motors, were eagerly buying up shares of Japanese automobile stock and strengthening ties with Japanese manufacturers. Chrysler claimed that it was taking advantage of a bullish Japanese market at a potential gain of $310 million, but industry pundits speculated that the motive went much deeper. Chrysler's audacious move likely stemmed from disagreements between the two companies over Mitsubishi's U.S. sales and distribution. In many cases, Mitsubishi-made products were being sold under the Chrysler name, often in direct competition with the Mitsubishi marque.

Duryea Brothers
Name:  1895DuryeaBros Medium.jpg
Views: 5139
Size:  97.0 KB

Los Angeles four level Interchange.
Name:  freeway2.jpg
Views: 4562
Size:  14.7 KB
Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia

SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd September 2008, 22:34   #171
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 23rd September

September 23, 1939
A.P. MacArthur pulled across the finish line in Ballinascorney, Ireland, on this day, winning the last Irish hill climb before World War II. Hill-climbing events usually took place on a public road, and they became wildly popular in Great Britain and Ireland during the early days of the automobile. Cars of all shapes and sizes would race up a hill, with drivers gunning their engines and showing off the prowess of their new motor car. Cheered on by a crowd of onlookers, the fastest car up the hill won. World War II brought an end to hill climbs and car racing in general, as manufacturers funneled their efforts into military production. However, hill climbing returned after the war, more popular than ever, most popular being the Pikes Peak event.

September 23, 1969
Tapio Laukkanen, Finnish rally driver was born in Lahti, Southern Finland.
In 1996 he won the Finnish Rally Championship in a Volkswagen Golf GTi and in 1999 he won the British Rally Championship with a Renault Mégane Maxi twinned with fellow Finn, Kaj Lindström.


September 23, 1972
The famous Crystal Palace racing circuit in London, England, was closed by the Greater London Council on this day, ending a 45-year racing tradition. The closing had been announced a few weeks before the beginning of the 1972 season, prompted by noise complaints and safety concerns. During its long history, the Crystal Palace circuit had hosted everything from the first televised auto race to a few demonstration laps by Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

Tapio Laukkanen
Name:  laukkanen200.jpg
Views: 4639
Size:  9.1 KB

Crystal Palace Circuit
Name:  CryPal_RaceCirc.jpg
Views: 4466
Size:  35.4 KB

As seen through google earth.
Name:  Crystal20Palace.jpg
Views: 4685
Size:  139.4 KB

Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia
racingline.net
google earth

Last edited by SirAlec : 22nd September 2008 at 22:36.
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th September 2008, 01:11   #172
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 24th September

September 24, 1908
The first factory-built Ford Model T was completed on this day, just one more step in Ford's affordable revolution. Affectionately known as the "Tin Lizzie," the Model T revolutionized the automotive industry by providing an affordable, reliable car for the average person. Ford was able to keep the price down by retaining control of all raw materials, and by employing revolutionary mass production methods. When it was first introduced, the "Tin Lizzie" cost only $850 and seated two people.

September 24, 1948
The Honda Motor Company, one of the world's leading automobile manufacturers, began as a research institute founded by engineer Honda Soichiro. The institute focused on creating small, efficient internal combustion engines, before it began incorporating these engines into motorcycles under the Honda name. It was on this day that the Honda Technical Research Institute officially became the Honda Motor Company, establishing a corporation that would become the leading producer of motorcycles in the world.

September 24, 1974
General Motors announced that the release of the "Monza," its rotary-engine sports compact, would be postponed due to problems complying with new EPA emissions standards. Environmental concerns had become an increasingly high priority with the American public, and the government had been responding accordingly. Pressures on the automotive industry had been riding high since the 1970 Clean Air Act, rising even higher with the new National Ambient Air Quality Standards of 1971. With both public opinion and the federal government against them, GM had no choice but to delay the new model's release.

Source:
The History Channel

Wikipedia
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th September 2008, 21:50   #173
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 25th September

September 25, 1926
Henry Ford of the Ford Motor Company announced the 8-hour, 5-day work week.

September 25, 1936
Bill Schindler, a race-car driver, met with misfortune on this day, crashing during a sprint race in Mineola, New York. Three days after the accident, Schindler's left leg had to be amputated. However, this loss did not prevent him from continuing his career.


September 25, 1987
Ray Harroun's place in history was sealed when the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp featuring the famous racing champion. Called "Racing Car 1911," the stamp depicted Harroun and the Marmon Wasp which he drove to victory in the first Indy 500. Harroun, an engineer, had built the car himself and was the only driver on the Indianapolis track without a riding mechanic. The mechanics usually accompanied the driver in order to warn him of the other cars in the race, but Harroun went the race alone after he rigged up a device that allowed him to see the cars behind him--the first rearview mirror. The race took over six hours to complete, with Harroun coming from 28th place to finish first. He died in 1968 at the age of 89.

Bill Schindler
Name:  Bill_Schindler.jpg
Views: 4219
Size:  14.0 KB

Bill Schindler's biography by Nat Klienfeild
Name:  250schindler.jpg
Views: 4110
Size:  29.5 KB

Name:  bill_schindler_2.jpg
Views: 4621
Size:  99.4 KB

Ray Harroun
Name:  22623_1034042177.jpg
Views: 4164
Size:  87.9 KB

Postage stamp depiciting Ray Harroun and his Marmon Wasp
Name:  stamp.jpg
Views: 3979
Size:  26.9 KB

Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia

Last edited by SirAlec : 24th September 2008 at 21:52.
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th September 2008, 22:49   #174
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 26th September

September 26, 1910
William C. Durant, carriage maker and entrepreneur, was the original patriarch of the corporate behemoth General Motors. But financial difficulties cost him control of the company on this day. Determined to regain control of his brainchild, Durant joined forces with Louis Chevrolet to establish the Chevrolet Motor Company. Five years later, Durant and Chevrolet acquired control of GM and extended the massive umbrella of the General Motors Corporation, with Durant serving as president. Yet, he would go on to lose control of GM yet again in 1920, this time permanently.

September 26, 1982
The first episode of the television show Knight Rider aired on this day, starring David Hasselhoff as private eye Michael Knight. However, the real star of the show was "KITT," his talking car. KITT, a modified Pontiac Firebird, complete with artificial intelligence and glowing red lights, assisted Michael in his detective work. During the show's four years, KITT attracted a loyal fan following, and a few episodes even featured "KARR," KITT's look-alike nemesis.

KITT on display at Universal Studio
Name:  800pxKITT_Universal_Studios.jpg
Views: 5501
Size:  85.7 KB

Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th September 2008, 23:55   #175
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 27th September

September 27, 1925
Construction on the infamous Nurburgring racing circuit, often referred to as a "green hell," began today. The 12.9 mile course through the Eifel forests was considered the most dangerous segment of road on the planet, curving around 73 corners and covering a rise and fall of almost a 1,000 feet. The circuit held a strange spell over many drivers, beckoning the brave to test their skill. The "green hell" proved lethal to many, and was once rumored to average 20 accidents a day. Racing events are no longer officially held on the circuit, but the course is often used by auto manufacturers to test new models.

September 27, 1928
The first cornerstone of the Henry Ford Museum was laid today, the first step in establishing one of the most extensive collections of automotive history in the world. Although the museum is named after Henry Ford, its collection extends well beyond the Ford Motor Company. Its holdings include product literature, advertising and promotional materials, thousands of books, and almost 300 cars. The museum also hosts exhibits on everything from agriculture to industry and is located in Dearborn, Michigan.


September 27, 1990
Renault and Volvo signed an agreement of industrial cooperation on this day, outlining plans for an eventual merger. The merger plans were abandoned three years later, leaving a lot of unanswered questions and speculations. Many industry experts suspect that Volvo backed out of the deal due to their lingering suspicion of the French government. Renault, a state-owned company, was slated for privatization, but critics found the plans too vague and saw the French government as susceptible to pressure from its workers. Economic pundits pointed to Europe's recession and double-digit unemployment. Some merely felt that Volvo, a symbol of Sweden's industrial prowess, was being bargained away too cheaply.

Nürburgring circuit map, taken at German Grand Prix 1964. The legend advises "No driving in the Eifel mountains without a lap on the Nürburgring"
Name:  451pxNurburgring.jpg
Views: 6849
Size:  45.0 KB

The current 20.8 km (12.9 mi) Nordschleife course with 33 left and 40 right turns. The lower left yellow area indicates the location of a part of the Grand Prix course.
Name:  Nordschleife.png
Views: 4138
Size:  30.5 KB

Henry Ford Museum
Name:  HenryFordMuseum.jpg
Views: 4213
Size:  62.3 KB

Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2008, 19:02   #176
Senior - BHPian
 
aaggoswami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Vadodara
Posts: 4,675
Thanked: 1,426 Times
Default

September 27, 1908 - The first production of the Ford Model T automobile was built at the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Michigan.

Source: Wikipedia
Attached Images
 
aaggoswami is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2008, 19:59   #177
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 28th September

September 28, 1978
Car & Driver Editor Don Sherman set a Class E record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on this day, driving the Mazda RX7, the standard-bearer for the rotary engine in the U.S. market, and reaching 183.904mph. The RX7's unique rotary engine doesn't have the standard pistons, instead, two rounded "rotors" spin to turn the engine's flywheel. Although the rotary engine was not a new concept, the Mazda RX7 was one of the first to conquer the reliability issues faced by earlier rotary engines. Light and fun to drive, with 105hp from its 1.1 liter rotary engine, the RX7 was extremely popular.
Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia
PS: please use proper format to post in this thread.
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th September 2008, 22:49   #178
Senior - BHPian
 
aaggoswami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Vadodara
Posts: 4,675
Thanked: 1,426 Times
Default 28th September

September 28, 1982
UAW and Ford cooperate.

Ford took a major step in overcoming its history of poor labor relations on this day, opening the joint UAW (United Auto Workers) and Ford National Development and Training Center. The center, located in Dearborn, Michigan, provides education and training to workers, as well as community programs. Workers can participate in any of six major programs, learning about everything from math skills to pension plans. More importantly, the center also offers relocation assistance and several unemployment programs for laid-off workers. Ford subsidizes the training center with grants and tuition assistance.

September 28, 1988
U.S.P.S. unveils fire engine stamp

The Ahrens Fox Model AC fire engine had its 15 minutes of fame when the U.S. Postal Service featured the 1913 fire engine as part of its transportation series. The Ahrens-Fox Company was one of the most successful fire engine manufacturers in the country, thriving on the competition between volunteer fire companies that developed in the early twentieth century. These rivalries spurred ingenuity and innovation, as well as sales of fancy new fire-fighting equipment. The Model AC depicted on the stamp was bought by the town of San Angelo, Texas, for its fire department and featured new technology like the steam pump and chemical tank.


Source:
The History Channel


Last edited by aaggoswami : 27th September 2008 at 22:51.
aaggoswami is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2008, 22:53   #179
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 29th September

September 29, 1888
Daimler cars managed to make it to New York long before other imports due to an auto enthusiast named William Steinway. Steinway, concluded licensing negotiations with Gottlieb Daimler on this day, gaining permission to manufacture Daimler cars in the U.S. He founded the "Daimler Motor Company" and began producing Daimler engines, as well as importing Daimler boats, trucks, and other equipment to the North American market. Still, the U.S. was just a small portion of Daimler's market, and when he introduced a new line in 1901, he christened it Mercedes because he feared the German-sounding Daimler would not sell well.

September 29, 1908
William Durrant merged Buick, Oldsmobile (Lansing, MI) into General Motors. He also added Cadillac (Detroit) for $4.4 million cash, Oakland (Pontiac predecessor), dozens of parts suppliers (AC Spark Plug) into GM.

September 29, 1913
Rudolf Diesel is best known for the engine that bears his name, but few know that he was also a respected engineer, a linguist, a social theorist, and a connoisseur of the arts. But it was his diesel engine that changed the world, proving more efficient than steam and used on everything from locomotives to boats, eventually revolutionizing the automobile later in the century. The world lost this bright star today, when Diesel jumped overboard while crossing the English Channel on a cruiser committing suicide at age 55.
In the evening of 29 September 1913, Diesel boarded the post office steamer Dresden in Antwerp on his way to a meeting of the "Consolidated Diesel Manufacturing Ltd." in London. He took dinner on board the ship and then retired to his cabin at about 10 p.m., leaving word for him to be called the next morning at 6:15 a.m. He was never seen alive again. Ten days later, the crew of the Dutch boat "Coertsen" came upon the corpse of a man floating in the sea. The body was in such an advanced state of decomposition that they did not bring it aboard. Instead, the crew retrieved personal items (pill case, wallet, pocket knife, eyeglass case) from the clothing of the dead man, and returned the body to the sea. On 13 October these items were identified by Rudolf's son, Eugen Diesel, as belonging to his father.

September 29, 1983
Henry Ford II, grandson and namesake of Henry Ford, joined his grandfather today as a member of the Automotive Hall of Fame in Midland, Michigan. When he succeeded his father as president of the Ford Motor Company, the automotive giant was crumbling, losing several million dollars a month and mired in old-fashioned practices. Henry Ford II quickly set about modernizing the company and is often credited with its revitalization.

William Steinway
Name:  William Steinway.gif
Views: 4014
Size:  235.6 KB

William Steinway's ad. for Mercedes Benz.
Name:  AutoimgMB_3.jpg
Views: 3889
Size:  110.0 KB

Source:
The History Channel

Wikipedia

PS: I ommited those two as they didn't check out with other sources. and no image available of a single stamp. Thanks for the effort though.
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th September 2008, 22:16   #180
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: zxc
Posts: 3,394
Thanked: 658 Times
Default 30th September

September 30, 1901
Compulsory car registration for all vehicles driving over 18mph took effect throughout France.

September 30, 1937
The Duesenberg were considered the most luxurious cars in the world, hand-crafted and custom-made, heeded as the epitome of flamboyance and elegance. Their clientele included the great, the near-great, the famous, and the infamous. For almost 10 years, Duesenbergs were acknowledged as the ultimate in quality and value, inspiring the expression "it's a duesy." However, this symbol of opulence suffered during the hard times of the Great Depression, and Duesenberg was forced to close its doors forever on this day.

September 30, 1955
James Dean was killed in an automobile accident today along with his mechanic Rolf Wutherich, when Dean's Porsche 550 Spyder crashed head-on into another car. His fascination with cars and speed began when his father gave him his first '39 Chevy. Ironically, Dean had been on his way to a car race at the time of his death. Interestingly the porsche was known to be cursed after the accident. (follow the link)

1937 Duesenberg Sj number 397, The last Dusey
Name:  dusey SJ.jpg
Views: 3989
Size:  23.3 KB

Name:  dusey SJ1.jpg
Views: 3756
Size:  33.5 KB

James Dean and his rare 1955 Porsche Spyder
Name:  IN01_01.jpg
Views: 4158
Size:  11.4 KB

The Crash
Name:  Dean_crash.jpg
Views: 7557
Size:  44.0 KB

Interesting Article on the so called cursed Spyder
W E I R D U S D O T C O M


Source:
The History Channel
Wikipedia
Image: jalopnik.com

Last edited by SirAlec : 29th September 2008 at 22:18.
SirAlec is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tryst with history : Day Trip to Lepakshi benbsb29 Travelogues 10 12th March 2011 20:32
Evolution and History of Mercedes models over years - C, E, S and SL Class and more v12 The International Automotive Scene 52 13th September 2010 12:06
Pandavapura & Srirangapatana : A day's tryst with history benbsb29 Travelogues 34 28th January 2010 17:09
Porsche History in pictures GTO The International Automotive Scene 5 4th May 2004 03:51


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 22:47.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks