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Old 9th July 2014, 22:20   #3901
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

Just to give you some reference about price:

My cousin (a student in Ottawa) is looking for his first car with a budget of 5000$. Among many options he has tested so far, the best bet seems to be a 2000 Honda Accord with 230,000 kms on it for 3500$. The accord in question belongs to a close friend of mine and I know the service history of the car since 2008, it has undergone all major maintenance on time, and has never broken down. My cousin came across some interesting options with low mileage too but the fact that service history is unknown makes it risky. So, if you can find a car that belongs to someone you know, you may be able to alleviate some risk of buying budget car.


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Thanks for the suggestion Mohit, I will now include Hyundai as well in my search and see if it is within my budget. The one you included in your post seems to be good except that I dont want a black car.
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Old 9th July 2014, 22:33   #3902
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by infotech58 View Post
Just to give you some reference about price:

My cousin (a student in Ottawa) is looking for his first car with a budget of 5000$. Among many options he has tested so far, the best bet seems to be a 2000 Honda Accord with 230,000 kms on it for 3500$. The accord in question belongs to a close friend of mine and I know the service history of the car since 2008, it has undergone all major maintenance on time, and has never broken down. My cousin came across some interesting options with low mileage too but the fact that service history is unknown makes it risky. So, if you can find a car that belongs to someone you know, you may be able to alleviate some risk of buying budget car.
Thank you for your inputs infotech, your point is very valid about the service interval and the maintenance, what I am planning to do is to ask for "carproof" record which seems like has the history of the car along with claims / insurance / accident record, etc.

I dont know if it is always this tough to lookout for a used car that is worth the money spent or is it just me making it look so tough.
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Old 9th July 2014, 23:19   #3903
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Thank you for your inputs infotech, your point is very valid about the service interval and the maintenance, what I am planning to do is to ask for "carproof" record which seems like has the history of the car along with claims / insurance / accident record, etc.

I dont know if it is always this tough to lookout for a used car that is worth the money spent or is it just me making it look so tough.
Besides the carproof, it might be a good idea to get the car inspected by a BCAA inspector (http://www.bcaa.com/car-care/vehicle-inspection-service). Might uncover something that is not readily apparent. Someone who has stuff to hide might balk at the inspection which is a sign for you to look elsewhere.

The next thing you can do is to find a good independent mechanic. They will come in handy for routine maintenance and will be cheaper than the dealership.

You might want to add Fords to your list too (Focus and Fusion especially). Resale on them in not all that great so you might be able to get a decent one in your budget. e.g. (http://wwwa.autotrader.ca/a/Ford/Foc...howcpo=ShowCPO)
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Old 10th July 2014, 00:15   #3904
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Besides the carproof, it might be a good idea to get the car inspected by a BCAA inspector (http://www.bcaa.com/car-care/vehicle-inspection-service).
You might want to add Fords to your list too (Focus and Fusion especially).
Thanks again Mohit, the only hesitance on Ford is that the general advise given to me is that the American mules are cheaper on the parts but the overall maintenance would be high as the visit to mechanic shop will be more.

I do love the Ford Fiesta / Taurus but the "first car" thing is pushing me away from these cars.
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Old 10th July 2014, 11:38   #3905
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Thanks Maddy, this is now off my list, it would also help me to know if www.vmrcanada.com website could be used as reference for validating used car price.
I check KBB out here. Its a good source. Look for other brands too. You may find a better deal for the price.

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What do you guys think of leasing a car for two or three years?
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Is your question about whether to lease or Buy?
+1 Lease is nice to go high end.


This is my smallish rant on driving habits after my recent trip to LA from phoenix.

Your driving on a two lane highway keeping good speeds. Its empty and straight. Everyone is doing 85 which is fine. Trucks keep right and you are on the left. And all of a sudden you hit a slow bunch. Reason being there are some trucks on the right and folks are overtaking at their own speed.

Just curious to how difficult is it to overtake quick, keep right if your slow and stop breaking before overtaking a truck. This was a real bother.

Please add in if i am wrong. I would prefer if people were fined for obstructing traffic and not just speeding.

Maddy
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Old 10th July 2014, 12:27   #3906
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Your driving on a two lane highway keeping good speeds. Its empty and straight. Everyone is doing 85 which is fine. Trucks keep right and you are on the left. And all of a sudden you hit a slow bunch. Reason being there are some trucks on the right and folks are overtaking at their own speed.

Just curious to how difficult is it to overtake quick, keep right if your slow and stop breaking before overtaking a truck. This was a real bother.

Please add in if i am wrong. I would prefer if people were fined for obstructing traffic and not just speeding.
If you're doing 85MPH you were speeding in just about every state of the USA I seem to recall. There are minimum speeds on highways and freeways. Differs from state to state, sometimes it's explicitly stated. In practical terms it usually around 40-45 mph for highway and freeways.

So as long as anybody drives between the min and max speed legally there is nothing to complain about. And if you speed, or at least drive at the max speed you will find people in your lane that are overtaking traffic on the right and you will have to wait untill they have overtaken.

You could debate about how long it should take them to overtake and if they shouldn't speed up a bit to get passed quicker and allow oncoming traffic to get passed them. But this is probably a very grey area where you go from common sense, decency, consideration to your fellow drivers to "legally obstructing"

All of Europe follows the same rules, but with different min/max speeds. In some countries there is an explicit rule about staying in the slow lane. The idea it forces cars to move back in the slow lane as soon as they have overtaken and let the others get by. If you dont pull back into the slow lane after overtaking, with cars behind you, that might be construed as obstructing and for instance in the Netherlands you can and people do get fined for it.

Jeroen
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Old 10th July 2014, 22:23   #3907
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Default need servicing for2001 toyota camry

I have a Toyota Camry 2001 4-cyl model done 102000 miles.

Need to change Engine Oil
Oil Filter
FuelFilter
Air Filter
ATF Oil.

in the state of Michigan. Which is the most value for money shop to get the things done satisfactorily?
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Old 10th July 2014, 22:44   #3908
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

On two lane, yes its pain & there is little you could do. On 3-4 or more lanes, you shouldn't be on the left most lane for long duration, you could technically be fined even if you are not speeding as you are blocking an overtake only lane.
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Old 10th July 2014, 23:15   #3909
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

If you want people to move out of your way when they see you in their RVM, you have to be driving a big a** vehicle (minivans not included)
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Old 10th July 2014, 23:55   #3910
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

It gets tricky when the other guy is actually driving a big a** vehicle and you are left with no choice except to tailgate.... :P
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Old 11th July 2014, 09:45   #3911
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
If you're doing 85MPH you were speeding in just about every state of the USA I seem to recall. There are minimum speeds on highways and freeways.
All of Europe follows the same rules, but with different min/max speeds. In some countries there is an explicit rule about staying in the slow lane. The idea it forces cars to move back in the slow lane as soon as they have overtaken and let the others get by. If you dont pull back into the slow lane after overtaking, with cars behind you, that might be construed as obstructing and for instance in the Netherlands you can and people do get fined for it.
Jeroen
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On two lane, yes its pain & there is little you could do.
The limit was 75, yes i was over. Guilty.

My pain was folks not willing to pass quicker, rather choosing to take a minute to cross a truck. Its like two cars can never cross a truck together as the guy in front will SURELY not change lanes ones he crosses leaving the second car stuck next to the truck.

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(minivans not included)
Quote:
Originally Posted by balajird View Post
It gets tricky when the other guy is actually driving a big a** vehicle


Overtaking lane should be considered. Never going to happen though

By the way a guy in canada made a video advocating increase in speed limits and this was accepted by the govt.

http://jalopnik.com/someone-finally-...ise-1601088776
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Old 11th July 2014, 10:08   #3912
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

After a long search, I have finally been able to get hold of a car for self. This is Hyundai Accent, 2 Door, 1.6L. The highlight is that it has done 37000 miles, pretty low by US standards. The deal has been closed within 4 hours of this old lady posting this on craigslist as I was apprehensive if somebody else would buy it even before I did. At 38000 miles, it needs a timing belt change though. I am wondering if that could be accomplished by myself or is it better to take it to a workshop? The stated expense is about 500, which I consider is steep. Any ideas?

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Himanshu
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Old 11th July 2014, 12:03   #3913
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Default Re: need servicing for2001 toyota camry

Jiffylube has franchises all over the US. Usually they have discount coupons advertised at regular intervals. I have used them for servicing in the past and found them to be economical and quick.
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Old 11th July 2014, 13:08   #3914
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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At 38000 miles, it needs a timing belt change though. I am wondering if that could be accomplished by myself or is it better to take it to a workshop? The stated expense is about 500, which I consider is steep. Any ideas?
Are you sure about that? Usually it's more like 60.000 mils, so you might want to check. The owners manual should tell you.

I have no experience on this particular car, but in general it is possible to do timing belt chances yourself. You have to confident what you do, because if you put the new belt in without having ensured the proper timing of the valves etc, you could be in for a very expensive shock the first time you start the engine.

Check the various Hyundai owner forums and I;m sure you will find many descriptions and hints. The other thing is try and get hold of a Haynes or similar workshop manual. Most second hand book shops sell them or check Ebay or Amazone. It will definitely have a very detailled description of this and other jobs.

Something like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Repair-Manua...-/151206994073

Make sure you get it for the correct manufacturing year and sometimes there are small differences between US and European models.

$500 for the average time belt change doesn't sound that much to me. Labour in a manufacturer specific workshop will be upwards of $50 per hours. Parts are a lot more expensive then in India too.

I would not be surprised that on a job like this you would need $50-100 in gaskets alone, on top of that the belt and the labour. Depends a bit and I dont know this car specifically but timing belts could be anywhere from a 3-10 hour job.
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Old 11th July 2014, 13:29   #3915
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Default Re: need servicing for2001 toyota camry

How would Jiffylube compare to Walmart and Pepboys? The usual impression on the net is that chain stores are always more expensive than local garages. But I have not idea about local garages.
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