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Old 31st March 2015, 12:52   #4621
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Did you not try jump starting the car ? If so, did the battery not charge even after the car ran for sometime ? How old is the battery ?
Yes it worked with the jump start(yesterday). Today when he started it didn't start right away, took a few seconds to pull the charge.

The car is a 09, I'm not sure if the battery was replaced by the previous owner(probably was)

I reckon charging would help, but wasn't sure where to get it done.
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Old 31st March 2015, 14:51   #4622
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Find an autoparts shop such as Autozone, or whatever they might be called in your area. Most of them will do a free of charge of your battery and charger system.

Jeroen
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Old 1st April 2015, 07:30   #4623
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Yes it worked with the jump start(yesterday). Today when he started it didn't start right away, took a few seconds to pull the charge.
I was in the same situation a few months back. I went on a vacation for a week and my car was lying unused. I had to jump start the car and even after the car ran for a couple of hundred miles, the battery never fully charged. Every morning before I go to office I used to crank the car after praying to God. (Praying is good in a way ) This went on for a week and I decided to swap the battery. It was not worth bearing the tension every morning. More than that, the money I might have had to spend for road side assistance could have been more than that of replacing the battery. So it is simply not worth taking the risk. If you charge the battery and it still feels a little weird when it starts, go ahead and change the battery at that very moment. Not worth taking a risk. It might just be a $100 thing.
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Old 1st April 2015, 09:01   #4624
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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I was in the same situation a few months back. I went on a vacation for a week and my car was lying unused. I had to jump start the car and even after the car ran for a couple of hundred miles, the battery never fully charged. Every morning before I go to office I used to crank the car after praying to God. (Praying is good in a way ) This went on for a week and I decided to swap the battery. It was not worth bearing the tension every morning. More than that, the money I might have had to spend for road side assistance could have been more than that of replacing the battery. So it is simply not worth taking the risk. If you charge the battery and it still feels a little weird when it starts, go ahead and change the battery at that very moment. Not worth taking a risk. It might just be a $100 thing.
I will say it again and again and again and again. Never just swap parts. Always try to diagnose the problem first. You could have swapped a perfectly good battery whilst the problem was somewhere else. Just because the little red battery light on your dash doesnt come on, doesnt mean your battery is being charged properly.

Do a simple battery test and get the charging tested. As I suggested in the USA very simple as just about every autopart shop will do this test for you free of charge. Takes about 1 minutes! The you know 100% sure what to swap or fix.

Jeroen
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Old 1st April 2015, 10:00   #4625
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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
I will say it again and again and again and again. Never just swap parts. Always try to diagnose the problem first. You could have swapped a perfectly good battery whilst the problem was somewhere else. Just because the little red battery light on your dash doesnt come on, doesnt mean your battery is being charged properly.

Do a simple battery test and get the charging tested. As I suggested in the USA very simple as just about every autopart shop will do this test for you free of charge. Takes about 1 minutes! The you know 100% sure what to swap or fix.

Jeroen
No buddy.... I assumed people are sane enough to make sure it is not an alternator problem before swapping the battery. May be I should have made it clear. My bad !!

Last edited by DieselAddikt : 1st April 2015 at 10:01.
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Old 1st April 2015, 12:12   #4626
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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No buddy.... I assumed people are sane enough to make sure it is not an alternator problem before swapping the battery. May be I should have made it clear. My bad !!

Good for you. I would not say you are the exception to the rule, but I can point to hundreds of threads on this forum where members start swapping parts or being advised to swap parts without any form of diagnosis.

If I would get 1 ruppee for every post that suggests to swap the ECU without even understanding the problem I would be a rich man by now.

It could actually be even more simpler than the battery of the alternator. I would always check the cables, and especially the grounding on the chassis. Corroded connections give the exact same symptons upon starting as a bad battery. A battery terminal connection not clamped on properly as well.

Always give a few good tugs on both the positive and negative terminal and the same for the ground/chassis connection. Check for obvious signs of corrossion.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 1st April 2015 at 12:14.
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Old 5th April 2015, 18:31   #4627
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

I have signed up for the Basic Motorcyle Rider training program at the Nashua DMV from 24th to 26th April. These are the highlights of the program:
  • Course graduates are exempt from the DMV written and skills tests
  • A motorcycle learner's permit is not required.
  • Motorcycles and helmets are provided.
  • Courses will run, rain or shine.
  • No experience needed.

Basic Rider Training Program

Hope to get some riding experience in the summer and fall once I manage to get my permit

I have one friend who is a fan of cruisers and another who is into sports bikes. So, hopefully I will be able to experience both kinds of biking experience. Will need to rent bikes till I decide whether I want to own a bike, and what kind of bike and whether it is worthwhile to store them for the winters.

Can't wait for summer to start!!
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Old 5th April 2015, 19:05   #4628
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I have signed up for the Basic Motorcyle Rider training program at the Nashua DMV from 24th to 26th April. !
Good move.

I bought my very first motor bike ever two years ago here in Delhi. I decided to have some proper training too, before taking it to the (Indian) roads. So I actually took riding lessons back in my home country the Netherlands.

Glad I did, lots of valuable advise and tips. There is nothing better than hearing it from a real pro and have him/her coach you for several hundreds of kilometres.

Even small things, like how to put a bike on its stand. Unless you know, or somebody shows you, you are likely to give yourself a hernia.

Enjoy the bike riding.

Jeroen
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Old 6th April 2015, 05:01   #4629
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by amitoj View Post
I have signed up for the Basic Motorcyle Rider training program at the Nashua DMV from 24th to 26th April. These are the highlights of the program:
  • Course graduates are exempt from the DMV written and skills tests
  • A motorcycle learner's permit is not required.
  • Motorcycles and helmets are provided.
  • Courses will run, rain or shine.
  • No experience needed.

Basic Rider Training Program

Hope to get some riding experience in the summer and fall once I manage to get my permit

I have one friend who is a fan of cruisers and another who is into sports bikes. So, hopefully I will be able to experience both kinds of biking experience. Will need to rent bikes till I decide whether I want to own a bike, and what kind of bike and whether it is worthwhile to store them for the winters.

Can't wait for summer to start!!
Good move! You will enjoy the 2 days of training (assuming it is similar to the program in CA). Though it seems basic at times, I think its still useful (and fun!) for those of us who are used to riding in India. For example they teach you the difference between how to hold your body when you take a corner vs how to hold it when you swerve, whats the difference etc.

Personally, neither cruisers nor sport bikes appeal to me. I find cruisers to be heavy and clumsy in handling (though I've ridden a few of the heavy ones), I wouldn't enjoy riding one every day. On the other end, sportbikes' hunched over riding position doesn't appeal to me either.

A middle line can be found in one of the better-handling cruisers (I got a Yamaha Warrior - it looks and feels like a cruiser, but handles MUCH better because of its aluminum forks) or one of the upright bikes like the Bonneville and the BMW Nine-T. My personal all-time favorite is the Bonneville, I will definitely buy one some day. Definitely check these bikes out when you make that decision.

Last edited by rajushank84 : 6th April 2015 at 05:03.
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Old 6th April 2015, 18:30   #4630
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Good move.

I bought my very first motor bike ever two years ago here in Delhi. I decided to have some proper training too, before taking it to the (Indian) roads. So I actually took riding lessons back in my home country the Netherlands.
Thanks!
And it would be interesting to know how you are applying the lessons learned in your home country to riding in India. Because, at the face of it, I assume that the driving conditions in the two countries are as different as chalk and cheese!

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Originally Posted by rajushank84 View Post
Good move! You will enjoy the 2 days of training (assuming it is similar to the program in CA).

A middle line can be found in one of the better-handling cruisers (I got a Yamaha Warrior - it looks and feels like a cruiser, but handles MUCH better because of its aluminum forks) or one of the upright bikes like the Bonneville and the BMW Nine-T. My personal all-time favorite is the Bonneville, I will definitely buy one some day. Definitely check these bikes out when you make that decision.
Thanks! It is a 2.5 day course where 0.5 days are spent inside a classroom and 2 days outside, come rain or snow. This is New England after all. Anything is possible when it comes to the weather.

As for bikes, if and when I decide to buy one, it looks like I am going to be in a world of confusion!! So, I am not putting any thought into that right now. First aim is to get the permit, rent a cruiser for a weekend, ride into the White Mountains area, click a few pictures next to the bike, and post them on facebook.
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Old 6th April 2015, 18:58   #4631
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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And it would be interesting to know how you are applying the lessons learned in your home country to riding in India. Because, at the face of it, I assume that the driving conditions in the two countries are as different as chalk and cheese!

True, you can't compare at all really. But the basics of riding a motor bike are the same E.g. cornering, braking. So some of the basic riding techniques is just good to be told, then go out and practice with somebody observing. In the Netherlands your instructor will ride behind you on his/her bike and you will be able to talk to one another through walkie-talkie built into the helmets. So you get instructions and comments on your riding as you make your way through traffic.

My instructor spend a lot of time with me on defensive riding. Or to put it in his words, you are extremely vulnerable on a bike, adjust your driving to that. Or to put it differently, don't let your driving put you in even more vulnerable position then you already are.

For instance, if you drive your car through town on a road with cars parked, somebody might open a door. If you drive a car, at worst you bang into a rip it of the hinges. On a motorbike you might have yourself a very serious accident.

So he spend lots of time of being much more alert on your surroundings and endless talks and practices on what he called positioning. Where do you put your bike in relation to other vehicles?

So all in all, very useful.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 6th April 2015 at 19:01.
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Old 7th April 2015, 00:46   #4632
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by amitoj View Post
I have signed up for the Basic Motorcyle Rider training program at the Nashua DMV from 24th to 26th April. These are the highlights of the program:
I have one friend who is a fan of cruisers and another who is into sports bikes. So, hopefully I will be able to experience both kinds of biking experience. Will need to rent bikes till I decide whether I want to own a bike, and what kind of bike and whether it is worthwhile to store them for the winters.

Can't wait for summer to start!!
You did the right thing Amitoj. I would recommend the MSF for all levels of riders. Its very basic, but teaches a lot of new things especially that can/has to be applied while riding here.

Plus its the easiest way to get your license and save few $ on insurance

Now cruisers or spots bike is a topic of debate. When I came here I was fixed on getting Harley and had lots of discussions with Prasadee/VLOCT finally ended up buying sports bike.

The main reason I got the sports bike was I needed to ride with groups, learn & hone my riding skills, plus the adrenalin while taking turns at good speeds and do some track days. All my buddies owned sports bike and it made sense to get one and ride with them.
Whereas cruisers are rod buy more mature and elders. I did not have any one I knew who rides. Though I eventually want to get a Hog, because the riding postures are more comfortable and when I want to start riding long road trips.
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Old 7th April 2015, 03:28   #4633
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

Amit: Good job going for the MSF course. Its the most VFM option and frankly somethings which they teach will help you on the road. With regards to which bike to buy i would say visit all the showrooms and get a feel of everything. Know your limits and also dont get something which you will outgrow in a fairly small amount of time.

The motorcycle market is huge but go for something your comfortable in. Do realise your first bike will never be your last. Also buy used. You wont be stuck with payments and it wont be something the wife or mom will complain about.

Hope to see something Red and shiny on two wheels in your garage soon

Maddy
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Old 7th April 2015, 03:59   #4634
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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As for bikes, if and when I decide to buy one, it looks like I am going to be in a world of confusion!! So, I am not putting any thought into that right now. First aim is to get the permit, rent a cruiser for a weekend, ride into the White Mountains area, click a few pictures next to the bike, and post them on facebook.
Woohoo, another biker in the making. Two thumbs up on the MSF course. If you do not appreciate the sales people in the showrooms, visit a International motorcycle show - pretty much all makers and all models are on display, and no sales people- just hot girls.
http://www.motorcycleshows.com/
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Old 7th April 2015, 05:05   #4635
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Default Re: Buying, Owning, Driving and Maintaining a car in North America

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Originally Posted by maddy42 View Post
Amit: Good job going for the MSF course. Its the most VFM option and frankly somethings which they teach will help you on the road. With regards to which bike to buy i would say visit all the showrooms and get a feel of everything. Know your limits and also dont get something which you will outgrow in a fairly small amount of time.

Maddy
MSF courses are offered for free in many states.

Unfortunately most of the showrooms only let you sit and feel the riding position and do not give test rides(I'm sure you went through this).
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