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Old 29th November 2014, 08:34   #1
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Default Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Introduction:

Electric power and motorsport have never really been synonymous with each other. But the world is experiencing something of a paradigm shift. It's been a while since we've heard the characteristic boxer-burble on our favourite rally stages and these days, Formula 1 cars sound more like washing machines on steroids. Engines in hypercars are supplemented by electric motors. Glorious naturally aspirated 6-cylinder lumps in sporting cars are being swapped for boringly quick and sceptically efficient force-induced 4-bangers. So you can imagine why scores of enthusiasts went up in arms when the FIA announced that they will be introducing a Formula racing series wherein, the cars would be powered by electricity only.

While the purists cried themselves to sleep, the chaps at the FIA worked tirelessly through the night just to get the ball rolling. Two years after conception, the results are quite frankly fascinating! 2014 will go down in history as the year that witnessed the first ever all-electric Formula racing series. And what's more, an Indian team and an Indian racing driver were a part of it!

Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-carousel8.jpg

Enter Formula E, the FIA's first ever all-electric, single-seater racing series / championship. What the FIA aims to do with this racing series is to circumvent the stigma associated with electric cars and get hardcore petrol heads and automotive enthusiasts to embrace all things electric. The FIA would also hope that this initiative will get manufacturers all around the world to employ their technological prowess in the field of motorsport while allowing some of this technology to trickle down to cars in series production. This series, the FIA claims, revolves around three key ingredients and core-values: energy, environment and entertainment.

Last edited by GTO : 2nd December 2014 at 10:42.
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Old 29th November 2014, 08:35   #2
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Default re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

The Series / Championship:

The Formula E racing series will span over a period of 10 months, from September 2014 to June 2015. The 9 venues (Beijing – China, Putrajaya – Malaysia, Punta del Este – Uruguay, Buenos Aires – Argentina, Miami – USA, Long Beach – USA, Monte Carlo – Monaco, Berlin – Germany and London – United Kingdom) have been thoughtfully picked and in keeping with the eco-theme of the event, the circuits will be incorporated into the cities' streets by cordoning off certain sections of the road network.

By hosting the races inside the cities, the FIA hopes to instill a sense of passion in piloting your average, everyday electric car.

Personally, I believe that hosting a race on a tight street circuit has its own benefits. Apart from watching race cars being flung around corners where you'd normally find traffic lights, a tight circuit further enhances the sensation of speed not only for the drivers, but the spectators as well.

The FIA Formula E Championship will consist of both, a drivers' and a teams' championship, a la Formula 1. A driver's end-of-season total is made up of his / her best results less one. A team's total is made up by counting all scores during the season.

Drivers have to make one mandatory pit stop in order to change cars during the race and this change is keenly observed by an FIA steward to ensure that all safety procedures are followed. A minimum time period (determined on the day) is also enforced. Tyre changes, unless in the event of a puncture, are not permitted during pit stops.

Drivers score points using the standard FIA system of 1st = 25, 2nd = 18, 3rd = 15, 4th = 12, 5th = 10, 6th = 8, 7th = 6, 8th = 4, 9th = 2 and 10th = 1. Three points are awarded to the driver securing pole position. The driver who sets the fastest lap receives two points.

The top three drivers in each race receive a trophy that is presented on the podium. Trophies will also be presented to the driver and team champions at the end of the season. All drivers will receive prize money.

The organizers have carefully selected the dates of the races too, ensuring that they do not overlap with Formula 1 qualifying and race days.

Unlike other championships where the drivers are expected to go flat-out and extract the maximum performance out of their cars, this series is all about efficiency. Drivers are not permitted to use the electric motors beyond a certain limit prescribed by the FIA. This regulation instills a sense of challenge and teams and drivers are required to strategize accordingly. Being quick and efficient simultaneously is what's expected from teams and drivers. This makes driving these cars fairly demanding as one's instincts would be to go all out in a race car.

The Cars:

Photographs and lenses simply cannot replicate the sheer presence of these Formula E race cars. They look absolutely stunning! Typical of Formula cars, they are low, wide and are proportioned not too differently from Formula 1 cars.

The Spark-Renault SRT_01E built by new French company Spark Racing Technology, is the first car to be homologated by the FIA. Cars are engineered keeping in mind the tight budget allotted to the teams. The lightweight and strong monocoque chassis is a combination of carbon and aluminum honeycomb structures made by the Italian firm Dallara. It is designed to comply with the latest FIA crash tests - the same regulations employed in Formula 1. The bodywork is also made by the same firm and is a blend of carbon and Kevlar.

The electric powertrain and electronics including the ECU are supplied by McLaren Electronics Systems. In fact, the electric motor is nearly identical to the one that's found in the new McLaren P1 hybrid hypercar. Williams-sourced Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) batteries produce 200 kW, which is the equivalent of 270 bhp (approximately) and it is allied to a 5-speed paddle shift sequential gearbox, supplied by Hewland.

Double steel wishbones, pushrod operated, twin dampers and torsion bars form the front suspension while at the rear there's a spring suspension. The entire suspension is adjustable for ride height, camber and toe. Two-way (front) / four-way (rear) adjustable Koni dampers and adjustable anti-roll bar (front / rear) round up the suspension package. The brakes are two separate hydraulic systems and manufacturers are free to choose the material for the brakes as long as the body of the calipers is made of aluminium alloy.

The specially designed 18-inch O.Z. magnesium wheels and Michelin tyres complete the package. Surprisingly, the wheels and tyres bear little resemblance to Formula cars and look more like they've been nicked off a WRC car set-up for tarmac stages.

The steering wheel houses a dashboard that throws up a whole lot of information for the driver, as is the case with most Formula race cars. It also allows the driver to adjust various settings on the fly, not to mention swap cogs via the flappy paddles behind the steering wheel. The actual steering itself is a non-assisted rack and pinion setup but teams are allowed to use power-assisted steering.

The car tips the scales at a rather lardy 900 odd kilograms. Couple that figure with 270 horsepower and you might think that it’s not much more than one of the hotter hatchbacks in the Euro Market, but you couldn't be more wrong. It's the manner in which the electric motor produces its power that will blow you away. As most of you may know, unlike an internal combustion engine that produces its torque once you build up the revs, electric motors produce their torque at 0 RPM. That should explain the hypercar-like 0-100 time of 3 seconds. Top speed may be a measly 225 kph but you really wouldn't need much more considering that these cars are timed on street circuits.

It’s pertinent to mention that not a lot of R&D has gone into designing the cars for the purpose of aerodynamics considering the tight budgets of teams.

The Teams & Drivers:

Ten teams with two drivers each will fight it out for the top spot, much like Formula 1. Teams in Formula E must adhere to the prescribed budget cap of around $ 400,000 (per season) allotted to them. Teams are allotted four cars each for the span of the season.

Skim through the list of drivers in this racing series and you’d realize that more than half the grid comprises of drivers who've either driven or tested Formula 1 cars in the not-too-distant past.

Teams are allowed 9 days of testing, 5 days pre-season, 2 days in-season and 2 days post-season.

The Street Circuit:

Putrajaya, Kuala Lumpur’s satellite city played host to the 2nd race of the season:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-_l5r3861.jpg

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The political bigwigs in Malaysia are clever. Rather than have the administrative buildings and offices within the Central Business District of Malaysia and in the process hamper the flow of traffic & choke the streets of Kuala Lumpur, they have built them in a secluded city with its own little road network ensuring that VIP movement is not restricted and that the state’s business industry and administration offices work separately and harmoniously.

The other upside to having the state’s administration in its own district is that you can be rest assured that the road network within the district will be smooth and well thought out, perfect for, ahem, a street-circuit.

Besides the actual race, the organizers have conceptualized this event keeping in mind the audience. The incorporation of the 'eVillage' in the event is rather clever, but expected from an event of this magnitude. You could take your family along for the race and make a day out of it by exploring the facilities at your disposal. Simulator competitions, eKarting, autograph-session with the drivers, interactive race quizzes and eBike stunt riders should keep the kids entertained while live demonstrations on the benefits of electric power should satisfy your inner geek sufficiently:
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The Support Cars:

The i3 and the i8 are the Official Medical Car and Safety Car respectively:
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Pages have been written, thousands of photos have been taken and dozens of videos have been shot, but nothing can prepare you for the sheer visual drama that is the i8. BMW have dusted off the idea of making a proper supercar to go up against the likes of the Audi R8 and the Mercedes SLS / AMG GT, and instead, made a sports car for the future:
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This car is from a different planet! It's the stuff of Sci-Fi movies, without a question or doubt. The floating bodywork, the creases and cuts, those lines and the proportions make for quite a sight. The sound, perhaps, is questionable. But, it's not too bad. It does sound sporty, but there's only so much a 3-pot engine can do for the ultimate aural experience.

Sitting pretty, next to the futuristic i8, was something I wasn't quite prepared for. It was the race director's gorgeous Rimac Concept One:
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It's arguably one of the most gorgeous cars I've seen in the flesh, and this is probably the last time I'm ever going to get to see it because the Croatian electric car company has made just 8 of them from January 2013 to October 2014!

Notice the carbon flaps around the corners of the front bumper, specifically designed to direct air through the front and along the sides of the car. Also notice the numbers above the grille. Yes, this car produces a mind-boggling 1,088 horsepower and has clocked a staggering 325 kph and 0-100 kph in 2.8 seconds on the V-Max:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-p1020171.jpg

What started out as a garage hobby, Mate Rimac (founder of Rimac Automobili), engineered the car from the ground up and sought help from former Pininfarina designers to sculpt this magnificent-looking thing. Each wheel is powered by a separate 12,000 rpm, 250 kW liquid-cooled permanent magnet motor via R-AWTV (All Wheel Torque Vectoring System), so it's all-wheel-drive! In spite of producing over 1,000 horsepower and 1,600 Nm of torque, the Concept One has a range of around 600 kilometers on one charge! And it costs an eye-watering US$ 1 Million! This is a supercar in every sense of the word!

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Last edited by suhaas307 : 21st February 2016 at 10:47.
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Old 29th November 2014, 08:37   #3
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The Experience:

Friday :: Shakedown

The event began with a 45-minute practice session followed by another 30-minute session, giving drivers their first experience of the circuit. Two cars are available to each driver, giving them the option to change cars should they wish. Full power (200 kW / 270 bhp) is available throughout. The practice session allows drivers to make notes of the track and get the engineers back in the paddock to set the car up accordingly.

Here's Bruno Senna getting ready to pull out of the Mahindra garage:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-p1020128.jpg

On the day of Shakedown, I had the pleasure of chatting with the friendly lads in the Mahindra Paddock. Their insights helped us understand how the teams and drivers work together. Strolling through the garage / paddock and the pit lane was very satisfying:
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The Office:
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But the biggest question we had was, "what do the cars sound like?"

I was expecting a quiet and silent race. But I was wrong. Sure, they aren't deafeningly loud like the V8 or V10 Formula 1 cars of yore. Heck, they aren't even as loud as the heavily muted turbocharged V6 Formula 1 cars of today. They have a very distinct noise that can only be described as bizarre. Heard from the press box, they aren't too loud. In fact, you may miss them coming down the main straight at full chat. At trackside though, it's a different story! You can nearly feel the vibrations on the tarmac as they whiz past you. It's the typical electric motor whine that we've gotten used to in mundane electric cars, albeit exaggerated. As the cars approach the first corner at full chat, you’ll hear the drivers frantically downshifting while the tyres howl and the cars scramble for grip.

Here's a quick video of the Formula E cars' sounds from the press box and trackside:


Practice went on for a couple of hours after which, we had the chance to catch up with Karun Chandok. Chatting with the Chennai-born racer revealed that the track was challenging in comparison to the one in Beijing. Putrajaya's street circuit has its fair share of cambers and corners that could catch you off-guard. It requires the drivers to employ different strategies and set the car up a little differently. The biggest challenge however was the heat. The battery packs tend to get pretty hot, touching temperatures of 55-60 degrees centigrade, thereby potentially affecting their performance and longevity. The pit crews were required to employ cooling ducts in order to keep the heat in check. While the same procedure will have to be employed in places like London where the weather is relatively cool, it's not an absolute priority given that Malaysia’s hot and humid climate isn't exactly conducive to this sort of a race where it can get physically and mentally demanding for both, the drivers and the pit crew.

Team Mahindra Racing though, was brimming with confidence. In spite of having to deal with pesky people like me, they worked like a well-oiled machine. The drivers, Karun Chandok and Bruno Senna, post car-thrashing, were feeding the tech guys back in the Mahindra Paddock with important information.

Virgin Racing's Englishman Sam Bird was the fastest man on the track during practice followed by Belgium's Jerome d'Ambrosio in Dragon Racing's No. 7 car, both recording times of 1:21:496 and 1:22:043 respectively. Karun Chandok in Mahindra Racing's No. 5 car was 6th in practice, recording a time of 1:22:825, about 1.3 seconds off Sam Bird's time. Bruno Senna was 3 seconds off the leader's time, securing 11th overall.

After Shakedown, the garages kept on display the nose cone, wings, carbon parts and assorted bodywork:
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Post-practice, at dinner, we troubled Karun with questions on his experience as a racing driver, his memorable stint at Formula 1 and his appearances in the Fifth Gear and Top Gear shows.

Last edited by GTO : 2nd December 2014 at 10:44.
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Old 30th November 2014, 22:00   #4
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Qualifying and Race Day:

The atmosphere for qualifying and race day, which are incidentally on the same day, was electric!

Horrible clichés and puns aside, the experience was phenomenal. It was great to see some Indian support at the venue:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-p1020161.jpg

As drivers paced around nervously, the Mahindra pit crew suffered a setback that, unfortunately, cost them dearly later that afternoon. A member of the pit crew had suffered a heat stroke and had to be wheeled to the hospital. A replacement crew member was summoned immediately.

Qualifying began at 10 am and was done in a little under 1 hour. Four groups of 5 drivers were selected and each group was allotted 10 minutes of track time to set their fastest laps. The drivers are allowed to use the full potential of the electric motor / batteries. Three points are awarded to the fastest driver during qualifying. It's pertinent to mention at this point, that teams and drivers are not allowed to top up their batteries during the race, and doing so will attract penalties.

Frenchman Nicholas Prost secured pole position for e-dams-Renault, setting a time of 1:21:779, but was awarded a 10-place grid penalty for causing an avoidable collision during Round 1 of the ePrix at Beijing. Oriol Servia for Dragon Racing set the 2nd fastest time of 1:22:010 and Sam Bird was behind him by two-tenths of a second. Karun's time of 1:22:262 landed him 6th position on the grid while Bruno Senna occupied the 9th spot after setting a time of 1:22:816.

During the race, drivers are expected to use only 150 kW of power even though 200 kW is at their disposal. This makes driving fast, fairly tricky and challenging as drivers who exceed the 150 kW limit will be slapped with a penalty of 1 minute. However, with the introduction of FanBoost, life as a popular Formula E racing driver has suddenly gotten more interesting!

The FIA has come up with an ingenious way to get fans involved in the sport.

FanBoost is an interesting concept that allows fans to vote for their favourite drivers on the grid. Three drivers with the most votes will receive 5 seconds of added thrust (or 'power-boost' as the FIA calls it) and the drivers are free to utilize this advantage any time during the race. When the drivers engage FanBoost, power is momentarily bumped up by 30 kW, from 150 kW to 180 kW. The voting booth closes an hour prior to the start of the race.

Mahindra Racing's Bruno Senna, Amlin Aguri’s Katherine Legge and Venturi’s Nick Heidfeld were the winners of the FanBoost voting competition at the Putrajaya ePrix, scoring 21, 77 and 23 points respectively.

Personally, I believe that it's a bit gimmicky. But it's a great way to get the fans to follow the sport keenly.

Before the race had begun, Renault kept the crowd entertained by showcasing their new electric supermini's sliding-abilities. A bunch of drivers made some noise by toying around with 4 Renault Zoes and a Renault Twizzy! Two riders on electric bikes showcased how incredible these little things are when you twist the throttle:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-_dd36610.jpg

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The Race:

The race began in usual fashion, with the lights going off and the drivers lunging themselves forward towards the first corner. The sound of tyres squealing would at times drown out the whine from the electric motors. An incident almost immediately after the start of the race left Matthew Brabham's Andretti race car crippled, forcing him to make an unscheduled pit stop. While Brabham pulled into the pit lane, the stunning BMW i8 safety car was pressed into service for the first time in Round 2.

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This allowed the drivers to close the gaps between the cars. Once the debris was cleared, the safety car withdrew and the battle commenced once again. The Mahindra Racing drivers made their way through the field and Karun found himself at No. 3 in no time and Senna wasn't far off either.

The fantastically designed circuit allowed for strategic overtaking and the drivers made full use of this by swapping positions frequently. Senna, one of the Drivers with the FanBoost advantage, decided to make use of it by passing e-dams-Renault's Nicolas Prost on the Main Straight, putting himself in 4th position. Who'd have thought we'd see a Senna-Prost battle in 2014?
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-el0g1335.jpg

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Fancying a podium finish half way through the race, Karun pulled into the pit lane, right behind the drivers in 1st and 2nd place, to make his mandatory and scheduled pit stop where he had to switch cars in the Box. Now this may not have been Mahindra's first outing in motorsport (they have presence in MotoGP too), but their inexperience in the paddock was evident as the pit crew struggled to get Karun Chandok’s car going thereby negating the advantage he had built. The member of the pit crew who had suffered the heat stroke was the person in-charge of strapping Karun in place during the mandatory pit stop. Mahindra Racing fans watched hopelessly as the first two drivers pulled out of the pits followed by drivers who had held 4th and 5th up until then. Team Mahindra Racing's nightmares didn't end there. Bruno Senna crashed into the wall before the penultimate corner on the last lap and he eventually secured 14th.

Amlin Aguri’s Katherine Legge received a 23-second penalty for causing a collision and had also received a 10-place grid penalty for changing the RESS system. Ex-Formula 1 driver Jarno Trulli received a 23-second penalty for causing a collision during the race and so did Team Andretti’s Franck Montagny.

Sam Bird, race day's favourite, took top honours by setting a time of 51:11.979, nearly 5 seconds ahead of 2nd placed Lucas Di Grassi for Audi Sport ABT. Sebastian Buemi for e-dams-Renault was the hero of the day, working his way through the field from 19th to 3rd:
Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia-el0g1786.jpg

A visibly dejected Karun addressed the press after the dust had settled, exclaiming that like most other sports, Formula E is a team sport too. It was evident that Karun Chandok would have secured an admirable 2nd had the car swap during the mandatory scheduled pit stop been executed as planned.

Tough luck this time for Team Mahindra Racing. However, the crew is confident and optimistic about coming back strong in Round 3 of the Championship at the Punta Del Este, Uruguay.

Some parting shots:
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The Future:

The CEO of FIA Formula E, Alejandro Agag displayed optimism when asked about the future of Formula E. He stressed on the fact that other championships relied on big budgets that eventually resulted in abject failure. "That will not be the case with Formula E” Mr. Agag said, pointing out that the whole championship is run on a budget, ensuring that teams and organizers don't exceed their financial abilities and then pull out for want of funds.

The whole idea of fixing budgets is smart. Not only does it keep teams in check, but also helps the organizers understand their limitations and stay within their means. We have to remember that the organizers have to dismantle and again install the paraphernalia when they move to the next venue after each round.

Going forward, the FIA will announce that after the conclusion of the first season, constructors will be obligated to lend their cars to 3 other teams, should they ask for it. The cars will be sold at a fixed price as dictated by the FIA.

The future of Formula E is certainly a promising one. Watching Formula E cars, whiz past the India Gate in New Delhi or go 'round Marine Drive in Mumbai or even watch them fly through the green and serene Cubbon Park in Bangalore, should get pulses racing!

Disclaimer:

- Some of the images have been taken from the FIA Formula E Website.

- Team Mahindra Racing and Tourism Malaysia invited Team-BHP for this race. They covered all the travel expenses for the event.

Last edited by GTO : 2nd December 2014 at 10:45.
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Old 2nd December 2014, 10:48   #5
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Thread moved from the Assembly Line (The "Assembly Line" Forum section) to Int'l Motorsport. Thanks for sharing!

Thoroughly enjoyed the read, written like a true petrolhead. Rating thread 5 stars
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Old 2nd December 2014, 12:33   #6
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Great read and brilliantly covered.
Thanks for the detailed write-up.
Hopefully all the tech and R&D of the electric car racing trickles down to the road cars at the faster pace.
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Old 2nd December 2014, 15:45   #7
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Awesome report Suhaas!

Extremely well written and informative.

I'm a big fan of electric cars, but i gotta say, the lack of "real" sound as they are coming down the straight is a huge bummer. It's one less 'sense' in the whole sensory experience of watching a car race. What's worse yet is that the crowds will probably have to listen to some banging-loud techno-pop instead

The FanBoost concept is interesting, and i wonder how much further that could be taken to boost fan involvement.

Then, there's the Rimac! Wow. You're a lucky guy to have spotted one in the flesh.

Here's the Team-BHP thread for the car (Gorgeous & Electric : The Rimac Concept 1).

^ Don't miss their prototype eM3!

cya
R
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Old 3rd December 2014, 11:29   #8
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Thanks for the amazingly detailed write-up suhaas307

270HP of power but more importantly, the ~230Nm torque at all RPMs! that must be exhilarating.
And that 1088 Horses Rimac Concept one! I'm out of words. Simply Beautiful.

I just can't imagine a silent (almost) race exciting anyone.
May be instead of the ear-buds we get in a F1 race, organisers should give a headphone with a sound synchronous to the car

This is a race for a future and if this succeeds in attracting people towards electric cars, someday hopefully I can see silent roads in our country.

Last edited by hemanth.anand : 3rd December 2014 at 11:41.
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Old 4th December 2014, 10:36   #9
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Never knew there was anything going on like this until I read this report. Simply amazing.

I get the feeling that I may easily give up the lack of any noise from the engine in favour of the sheer power and performance available from a electric car. The whine of the electric motors in the video reminds me of the noise from the traction motors of a high speed electric train.

Thank you for putting up this highly detailed report of a motor sport that is in a different league.
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Old 5th December 2014, 09:14   #10
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Very nicely penned down report, Suhaas. Your passion, enthusiasm & the fun you had comes out clearly in the report and makes it a very nice read.

Kudos to FIA for conceptualizing & executing this e-Formula series. Soon the R&D from such initiatives will trickle down to mainstream e-vehicles and that would be a win-win for all.

BTW, why do the drivers change cars in middle of race? Battery runs out or what?

Few questions that come to mind:

# How is the battery in these cars different from the normal electric cars that we drive?

# The battery management systems: How are they different and what challenges, focus on performance vs longevity?? (You mentioned battery pack getting hot)

# In the race car pics, where are the battery packs located? Couldn't make out from the pics
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Old 5th December 2014, 10:31   #11
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rehaan View Post
The FanBoost concept is interesting, and i wonder how much further that could be taken to boost fan involvement.
I can only assume, given racing's almost all male viewership, that the fan votes (and boost) Katherine Legge got must have a lot to do with her gender.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemanth.anand View Post
I just can't imagine a silent (almost) race exciting anyone..
Yeah that would be a weird feeling. In many F1s you can hear the cars before they bear down and pass you in the stands. Maybe they could engineer the noise back!

Quote:
Originally Posted by khan_sultan;3595514#
In the race car pics, where are the battery packs located? Couldn't make out from the pics
I would assume where the engine normally sits, right over the driven wheels, to improve traction.
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Old 5th December 2014, 13:42   #12
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Wow nice report Suhaas!

Wonder how it would be once they get to a point where instead of changing cars, they would actually recharge and go. The day of fast recharge is not that far ahead and it would be really awesome when they start playing that in the formula-e.
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Old 5th December 2014, 14:09   #13
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

Fantastic report Suhaas!

The gearbox whine coming from Formula E cars sounds miles better than the current crop of F1 cars for sure I just love it when they show videos from the back where the whine is very much audible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by khan_sultan View Post
Few questions that come to mind:

# How is the battery in these cars different from the normal electric cars that we drive?

# The battery management systems: How are they different and what challenges, focus on performance vs longevity?? (You mentioned battery pack getting hot)

# In the race car pics, where are the battery packs located? Couldn't make out from the pics
All your questions are answered (and then some) in the below fantastic video :

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Old 10th December 2014, 10:48   #14
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Default Re: Report: 2014 FIA Formula-E. The Putrajaya ePrix @ Malaysia

For those interested - next round in Uruguay.

Can watch live streaming - details in the link below

http://www.fiaformulae.com/en/news/2...ve-online.aspx

Best Regards & Drive Safe

Ram
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