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Old 17th June 2015, 12:11   #1
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Default 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

With your permission,DeetJohn.
Admins, please delete if a thread already running.

Images : From Lotus tem preview, FIA media pack, F1 website.

2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread-summary.jpg

Statistics:
  • Run to Turn One : 185 metres
  • Longest straight : 868m, on the approach to Turn One
  • Top speed : 330km/h on the approach to Turn One
  • DRS zones : Two – on the approach to Turns One and Three
  • Brake wear : Medium.
    (There are only nine corners around the lap, but there are three big braking events – each one slowing the cars from more than 300kph to less than 100kph.)
  • Pitlane length : 242 metres
  • Major changes for 2015 : None
  • Chance of safety car : Medium
  • Most wins by driver : Alain Prost x3
  • Most wins by team : McLaren x6

Overview:

2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread-track-details.png

In terms of time, Spielberg is the shortest track of the year. It takes just 68s to complete a lap of the 4.326km circuit, which is made up of only nine corners – the fewest of any circuit on the Formula 1 calendar. There are four long straights, each one preceded by a slow corner, and that places the engineering emphasis on traction and straight-line speed.

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The circuit has an elevation change of 65m and it’s also high: the track is situated 700m above sea level, which puts it at a similar altitude to Interlagos in Brazil. The reduced atmospheric pressure reduces the power of a naturally-aspirated engine by 7 per cent and forces the turbo on the current power units to spin faster, to compensate for that loss from the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE).

The atmosphere

2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread-140050aut.jpg

The Red Bull Ring is set in a natural basin and therefore offers one of the best views of any race track on Grand Prix calendar. Set in the mountainous Styrian region in south-east Austria, the circuit is by far the most scenic, boasting views of forest and mountains. The sloping terrain around the track which creates a natural arena solves the discrepancy between safety and the closeness of the spectators to the action in the best possible way. In the best spots, one practically sits above the race cars and can spot the drivers in their cockpits as they break, tackle accelerate out of the corners which gives one the feeling of being part of the action; at most other tracks you are so far away you have to use binoculars. Certain places allow views of two thirds of the track. The crowds will be wearing Red Bull colours for obvious reasons, but expect lots of support for the German drivers too.

Best overtaking spots:
Austria is not the greatest circuit for overtaking, mainly due to the relative shortness of its straights. Turn 2, Remus, is likely going to be the source of much action, as is Turn 3, Schlossgold – which follows the first of two DRS zones. The second DRS zone on the main straight will also offer a platform for some fairly textbook overtakes into Turn 1, Castrol Edge.
Key corner : Turn Nine. This is the final corner; it has a tricky downhill approach and the exit is vital because the first of the track’s two DRS zones is located on the start-finish straight.
It is not unusual on this track to witness the now-rare spectacle of cars powersliding. The surface lends itself to powersliding more than newly designed tracks.

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Weather forecast
Both Friday and Saturday are forecast to be partly cloudy with a 20 per cent chance of rain. Sunday, however, is likely to see showers, with a 50 per cent chance of rain.
Because of the Red Bull Ring’s location in the mountains, rain is a constant threat. Things can change very quickly. However thanks to the camber of the circuit, and the fact that the circuit sits in a natural amphitheatre, surface water isn’t generally an issue – it drains quickly.

Pirelli Preview:
Paul Hembery (GBR) Pirelli Motorsport Director :
“Austria ends the run of soft and supersoft nominations that we see towards the middle of the season, on quite a diverse variety of tracks. The tyre strategy will depend on some extent to the weather: if it is warm we are more likely to see two stops, whereas if it’s cool the balance might shift towards a one-stopper. Rain is also a distinct possibility in Styria at this time of year, as we saw during free practice last season, so the teams will basically have to be prepared for everything. This year, the drivers head to the Red Bull Ring with real data about the track for the first time, which will help them find the most efficient way to use the tyres. Obviously our aim is always to have between two and three stops at every race, so this is something that we will monitor carefully in future when it comes to nominations: we do have the possibility to make some minor changes if required. We’re only expecting a small time gap between the two compounds in Austria, so this opens up a number of different possibilities as to how to run the race strategy.”

Race Forecast:
The main Mercedes powered teams—Mercedes, Williams and Lotus—should easily get both cars into the points. Ferrari too have a good engine and both Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen should score high. Providing those four teams finish, there will be just two opportunities for Renault-powered teams. Auto Motor und Sport (h/t Grandprix.com) reports both Red Bull drivers may be taking full new power units. The resulting penalties would see them start right at the back and in that case Force India who will have the new, upgraded Mercedes engine for the first time look most likely to round out the top 10. The McLarens might qualify better as the car seems closer relative to their rivals over a single lap than it does over long runs. But when the race gets under way, expect them to fall back and maybe there will be another angry radio message from Fernando Alonso.
Hamilton spun in qualifying last year which left him ninth on the grid from where he salvaged second place, but he was the quickest man on the circuit all weekend—he should have won last year and at the Red Bull Ring this weekend he is expected to dominate. Sebastian Vettel missed out in Canada after problems in qualifying. The German started 18th but demonstrated excellent race pace to finish fifth. Austria is a similar sort of track to Canada with long straights and not much in the way of corners. So we can expect Ferrari to again be strong.
The Red Bull Ring has a wide, uphill run to Turn 1, and if Mercedes continue their recent run of bad getaways, Vettel or someone else, could split them off the line. If the W06 has a weakness, it's getting moving from a stationary start.
The 2015 season is at a crucial time where the in-season upgrades are coming in & the penalties for PU usage is being imposed. Will update on the action on that front later.

A bit of history:
First race : 1970, Grands Prix held : 26.
The Austrian Grand Prix began life on an abandoned airfield at Zeltweg. Cones were arranged to form a rather bland “L” shape circuit in 1958. Bland it may have been on paper, but the circuit proved instantly popular and things very quickly began to catch on.
The Austrian authorities desired hosting an F1 Grand Prix, and such ambition led to a flurry of talented drivers entering the sport professionally. Such interest convinced the Austrian authorities that a Grand Prix was worth investing in. A purpose built circuit was constructed in Spielberg – the Osterreichring – and hosted its first Grand Prix in 1970. The race was won by Belgian Jacky Ickx.

Osterreichring would hold the Austrian Grand Prix every year until 1987, when the circuit found itself increasingly far behind contemporary standards. The narrow pit straight in particular was a concern, with the 1987 race requiring two restarts as a result of collisions. The track was also deemed unsuitable for the speeds of the turbo cars of the era, which were capable of producing over 1200bhp.

The race returned to the F1 calendar in 1997 after Austrian telecommunications company, A1, funded a complete rebuild of the circuit on the layout designed by Hermann Tilke. While the principle shape of the track remained, the fast sweeping corners were blunted down into tighter hairpins, and the straights greatly reduced in length. Despite some saying that the challenge of the original circuit had been lost, the now-called the A1 Ring still received positive feedback from the drivers.

But the race would disappear again after 2003, and it would be July 2014 before Austria would return. Red Bull owner Dietrich Mateschitz - an Austrian national - bought the circuit in 2013 and invested in further improvements. The new Red Bull Ring complies with all current international safety standards. This means that every type of racing permitted under FIA (four-wheel) rules can be held there.



The circuit was also the scene of the infamous “Team Orders” row in 2002 when Ferrari driver Rubens Barrichello, who was leading on merit, was ordered to move over and let teammate Michael Schumacher by to win so as to cement the German’s championship. It was a debacle and was met with a huge backlash.

Present Constructors standings:
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Current Drivers standings:
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Old 17th June 2015, 13:12   #2
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

What time is it?
Its Hammer time!

I do hope the qualifying grid throws up split teams. Otherwise the season is becoming vettel-esque. Not that I am complaining!!!!
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Old 17th June 2015, 13:22   #3
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayankk View Post
What time is it?
Friday FP1: 13:30 - 15:00
Friday FP2 : 17:30 - 19:00
Saturday FP3 : 14:30 - 15:30
Qualifying : 17:30 - 18:30
Race : 17:30
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Old 17th June 2015, 13:56   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubby View Post
Friday FP1: 13:30 - 15:00
Friday FP2 : 17:30 - 19:00
Saturday FP3 : 14:30 - 15:30
Qualifying : 17:30 - 18:30
Race : 17:30

Thats not what I meant .

But thanks anyway. I actually did not know. I was going by the timings in the first post.
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Old 17th June 2015, 14:10   #5
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayankk View Post
Thats not what I meant .

But thanks anyway. I actually did not know. I was going by the timings in the first post.


I too was wondering, but then I thought maybe you are in some restricted internet environment wherein you can't access a site (Sports) that would give you times
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Old 17th June 2015, 14:12   #6
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubby View Post
Friday FP1: 13:30 - 15:00
Friday FP2 : 17:30 - 19:00
Saturday FP3 : 14:30 - 15:30
Qualifying : 17:30 - 18:30
Race : 17:30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayankk View Post

Thats not what I meant .

But thanks anyway. I actually did not know. I was going by the timings in the first post.
Thanks for putting up the timings in IST.
The original post has the timings in LT.
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Old 17th June 2015, 21:19   #7
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Newly-crowned Le Mans winner Nico Hulkenberg will be among the drivers fielding questions in Spielberg on Thursday, while on Friday it is the turn of team technical personnel to face the media. The line-ups in full…

Thursday, June 18, 1500 hours local time (1300 hours GMT)
Fernando Alonso (McLaren), Nico Hulkenberg (Force India), Daniel Ricciardo (Red Bull), Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), Carlos Sainz (Toro Rosso), Sebastian Vettel (Ferrari)

Friday, June 19, 1600 hours local time (1400 hours GMT)
Mattia Binotto (Ferrari), James Key (Toro Rosso), Tom McCullough (Force India), Paul Monaghan (Red Bull), Pat Symonds (Williams), Rob White (Renault)

Source: http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...--austria.html

Austria preview

Mercedes
Lewis Hamilton

“It was a great feeling to finally get back on top in Canada and add to the great memories I have there. Now, though, it's time to move on and put things right at a circuit I had a tough introduction to last year - Austria. Although I struggled in qualifying, starting down in ninth, it was actually a great race fighting back through the field. I think I was about fourth or fifth by the end of the first lap and then just kept chipping away to claw my way back to the podium, which was really good fun. Of course, I'll be working hard to have a clearer shot at the win on Sunday. Whatever happens, though, you can be sure the atmosphere will be incredible. Last year the grandstands were absolutely packed and the fans were just insane, so I'm looking forward to putting on a show for them.”
Nico Rosberg
“Canada was really lost for me on the Saturday. Not getting everything together in qualifying hurt my chances big time - but I had the pace and that's a big positive to take forward and go maximum attack in Austria. My first race at this track last year couldn't have been much better. Of course, we didn't have the ideal start in qualifying - but we nailed it on Sunday and it was great to get the win. I'm sure we'll have some tough competition here once again with Williams and probably some others too. But it's a circuit I really enjoy driving and the crowds are unbelievable, so I'm looking forward to getting back out there and having a good battle. Of course, it's a home race for Niki and Toto, too, so we'll need to be on our best form for this one!”
Toto Wolff, Head of Mercedes-Benz Motorsport
“Coming away with another top result in Canada, it would be easy to sit back and think we've got everything under control. But in reality, this is never the case. Not only did that race require a careful balancing act from the pit wall and from the drivers, but we also saw that there is more to come from our competitors - even if maybe it wasn't clear from the result. There must be more to come from ourselves if we are to continue this good form. Austria will provide a tough test. We had a challenging weekend there last year and fully expect another close competition this time around. The battle is far from over.”
Paddy Lowe, Executive Director (Technical)
“Spielberg is a great circuit - fast and flowing with relatively few corners but some spectacular elevation changes. Last year was, of course, the first Austrian Grand Prix for many years and the crowds were fantastic, creating a really good atmosphere. On track, however, we didn't have our best performance of the season there last time out - despite coming away with a one-two finish. It was a difficult result to achieve - requiring some tight strategy calls to beat the Williams cars. Like Montreal, it's a circuit where the Power Unit will come to the fore. Pirelli have also nominated the soft and supersoft compounds for the third consecutive race which, combined with a very smooth track surface, will create some challenges. After two quite unique circuits in Monaco and Canada, it will be interesting to see how the field stands at a more 'normal' venue.”

McLaren
Fernando Alonso

“Montreal was a difficult race for the whole team – we expected it to be tough because of the nature of the circuit, but obviously a double retirement was especially disappointing. But, of course, just because a weekend doesn’t go to plan, it doesn’t mean we give up.
“We’re still seeing great progress every weekend, and we hope Austria will be the same. Our most important focus is reliability, so that we can get the most time on track in order to make the biggest improvements we can. This is a very physical circuit with four long, fast straights and heavy braking in the corners, so it’ll be challenging for our package, but it’s a really interesting track to race on.
“Spielberg is a beautiful location for a Grand Prix and going back there last year after an 11-year break was a great experience. It’s still the great circuit it was, and there are quite a few overtaking opportunities which make it even more enjoyable. We’ve already put the last race behind us and I’m keen to get out there, race hard with our nearest competitors, and hopefully have some fun.”
Jenson Button
“Over the past few days we’ve bounced back from Montreal and we’re already looking firmly ahead at the next challenge. As a team, we’re measured ultimately on where we finish on a Sunday afternoon, which doesn’t take into account the progress we’ve made behind the scenes, or in practice and qualifying in the build-up to the race, so it can sometimes be difficult to see the positives after a tough grand prix.
“However, it’s important that we don’t forget how far we’ve come. Yes, both cars retiring from the race was not at all the result we’ve been working so hard for, but we are focused on the progress we’re still making and the improvements that we’ve already made up to this point. There’s still a huge amount of belief within the team, and we’re continuing to push for development in every area back in Woking and Sakura.
“Last year’s Austrian Grand Prix was a huge success, and for the few of us drivers that raced here pre-2003, it’s definitely considered one of those ‘mini-classics’: not so complex in terms of its configuration, but fun to drive. On paper, Austria won’t suit the characteristics of our car, but I’m looking forward to enjoying some good racing there and pushing to make more progress in every session.”
Eric Boullier, Racing director
“We can’t deny that retiring both cars in Montreal was a bitter blow, but, undeterred, we quickly shifted our attention to Austria. What’s important to remember is that, despite the disappointment of the last race, we’re always learning and improving, so we mustn’t be too disheartened, and instead we must keep our focus firmly on the road ahead.
“Reliability has been a key issue during our development push, particularly on Fernando’s car. It’s a crucial element of a race weekend that we need to improve in order to continue making progress. We’re getting there, but, like some other teams, we’re now getting to the stage of the season where faults and failures could result in penalties. But those are the rules, and they’re the same for everyone.
“Performance-wise, we expect the Austrian Grand Prix to be another tricky weekend, as it features heavy braking from high speeds and similar stop-start characteristics to Montreal.
“However, before we can even think about performance, we need to work even harder from the very beginning of our race programmes on Wednesday, to ensure all our processes, hardware and software configurations, and our entire approach to the weekend, are flawless, so as to give ourselves the best possible opportunity to get both cars to the chequered flag. In addition, as I say, we may have to consider strategically implementing updates with the aim of improving reliability and performance.
“Speaking more generally about the Austrian Grand Prix, last but not least, Spielberg is a fantastic circuit, immaculately organised and surrounded by stunning scenery, and the incredible fan support makes it even more special. Formula 1’s return to Austria in 2014 was a resounding success for the region as well as the sport, so we can be sure of a fantastic atmosphere and exciting racing this time around too.”
Yasuhisa Arai, Honda R&D senior managing officer – chief officer of motorsport
"Austria's Red Bull Ring is another power circuit with long straights similar to Canada, which means that it will be tough on the power units. We know that our results in Canada were disappointing, so we are now working hard to analyse, correct and mitigate issues going into Austria.
“The high altitude of the track will also affect the power unit performance, and the vehicle as a whole will require good aerodynamics and downforce. The new ERS system improvements made in Canada have been made to counteract this, and will be adjusted to the new aero and chassis updates planned for Austria.
“We will push forward to be stronger as a team."

Williams
Valtteri Bottas

“Austria is a beautiful country and the Grand Prix is packed with racing fans. The atmosphere is going to be great again I’m sure! It’s great to be going back to Austria. Last year, as a team we had strong qualifying with a front-row lockout, and in the race I achieved my first Formula One podium. The track, with its long straights and a mixture of slow and high speed corners requires good straight line speed and strong aero efficiency from the car. With the upgrades we are bringing here, we are expecting another strong weekend.”
Felipe Massa
“The circuit in Austria is a great track, very fast and really enjoyable to drive. Our car is normally suited to this track and I will never forget my pole position last year. Hopefully this year we can have a repeat or at least something similar, as we are looking to build on the momentum we have following Canada.”
Rob Smedley, Head of vehicle performance
“We are coming out of a race where we’ve shown great pace and good tyre management so going into Austria we can be confident of aiming for the front again. It’s a circuit that is very rewarding for power and drag and we know that our car is strong in these areas, so we’re confident. It’s a great little track out in the countryside, you get a lot of fans there who are big fans of Formula 1 which is always nice. Third is looking even more solid but we can’t take anything for granted and it isn’t just about third. We want to push on and try to close up to Ferrari. It’s a circuit where we can make points on them and that is our target.”

Toro Rosso
Carlos Sainz

“Austria is the home race for our big Red Bull family. I raced there back in my Formula 3 days but I imagine it will feel rather different in a Formula 1 car. From what I heard, last year’s return to this circuit turned into a great Grand Prix weekend for everyone, especially the crowds that came to watch and also in terms of the organisation. So I’m looking forward to going there and the track layout should suit us better than the last one in Canada.”
Max Verstappen
“I have always enjoyed driving at this track, especially in the Formula 3 car, which I tested and raced here so I know it quite well. It’s a very nice track in a beautiful location, even if the long straights might not suit us that well. There are some tight corners at the end of the fast sections, which means it can be hard on the brakes. It’s a bit of an old-school track, which is the type of circuit I like, so I’m looking forward to going there. Everyone in the team will be keen to get the best result possible at what is the home track for Red Bull.”

Force India
Nico Hulkenberg

"Finishing in the points in Canada was an important result for me. I had a great feeling with the car and everything came together nicely. I think we have a good opportunity for another strong result in Austria. I had never raced on this track before last year - not even in the junior formulas - so it was a new experience for me. It's a fun track and it flows nicely, but there are a few corners that can catch you out, so it's not easy to get a good lap together. It's one of those tracks that looks easier on paper because it's actually quite technical in many areas.
"Austria is a great place to race: the track is in a beautiful setting in the mountains and there's a very relaxed atmosphere. Without the German Grand Prix this year, I expect a lot of German fans to come to Austria this year so there should be a big crowd once again."
Sergio Perez
"The race in Austria is one I'm really looking forward to, both for the driving and everything that is around the event. The circuit has a simple layout and few corners and so the margins between drivers are smaller compared to some other tracks. It means a mistake in qualifying can set you back a long way. It requires a lot of concentration but it's fun to drive, with elevation changes and some very tricky corners.
"Not scoring in Canada was a disappointment so I want to make up for that in Austria. Last year it was not an easy race for me, starting far down the order [P16 following a grid penalty], but we had a brilliant race, scored well and set the fastest lap of the race.
"I remember getting to the Red Bull Ring for the first time last year, having never raced there, and meeting the fans. They had been waiting for the race for a long time and they helped create a great atmosphere. The Austrians have a great passion for Formula One - just like the Mexicans - and they are very proud of their Grand Prix."
Vijay Mallya, team principal
"Sahara Force India heads to Austria with a lot of positivity following a competitive showing in Canada. 21 points from seven races is a solid effort and keeps us well placed in the championship as we approach the middle of the season. The four points in Montreal were an important boost for Nico, who was a bit unlucky in Monaco and it's good to see him back in the points.
"Of course, this weekend's race is the first event to take place after Nico's incredible Le Mans victory. The 24 Hours is one of the great spectacles of motorsport: it is an amazing race that demands total commitment from drivers and cars. Nico's performance displayed his immense talent and made all of us at Sahara Force India proud. I truly hope he will be boosted by this success and translate it into another great performance in Austria.
"There's been a lot of talk about the development of the VJM08 and we are still on course to introduce an important step in Silverstone next month. In the meantime, the team has done well to squeeze more performance from our current package. The high-speed layout of Canada certainly played to the strengths of the Mercedes engine and, as Austria is regarded as another 'power' circuit', I would like to think we can be in the top ten once again."

Red Bull
Daniel Ricciardo

“[Austria is] not one of our strongest [circuits] but good nonetheless. It’s short, there aren’t a lot of corners - but the corners that there are good; there are a couple of proper quick turns and plenty to catch you out. It’s a fast track. You can have a good scrap as well. I finished the race [last year] in a really good tussle with The Hulk [Nico Hulkenberg]. Good stuff.
“Turn One is pretty cool as it climbs up the hill. It looks tight but actually it isn’t, it’s pretty quick, about third gear, and it opens up nicely. Turn Two is interesting as you climb a lot into what’s quite a tight right-hander, going uphill and off-camber. The second-last corner as well, that’s quick too. It’s quite flowing. There’s two tight corners but the rest are quick - third gear and up.
“With everyone camping around the track the atmosphere was like going to a festival - everyone sitting out in the sun, drinking beer, listening to music, up in the mountains. Yeah, I could go for a bit of that. Massive crowd of course, and genuinely supportive of the event. Not just the Red Bull teams but the entire grid. It was really noticeable on the drivers’ parade, which was by far the most lively of the whole year.
“I was rather cautious [about wearing the promotional lederhosen last year] so gave them a test run early in the week before rocking up in them on race day to maximise my Austrian Grand Prix experience. They’re surprisingly comfortable - a bit stiff at first but they come in after a while and develop a bit of give. I’m not saying they’re the thing for a 20-hour flight to Perth - but I reckon Oktoberfest, with a couple of beers… yeah, you’d be okay for a day.”
Daniil Kvyat
“First of all, I really enjoy the track; it’s a really good circuit. I already knew the track well as I had raced there before in junior series, so I was really looking forward to going back.
"I raced there in Formula Renault and also in Formula Three. [Kvyat won both races at the circuit during his 2012 Formula Renault 2.0 Alps campaign and was on pole and finished second in all three FIA European Formula Three Championship races at the track in 2013]. It’s great fun to drive. Actually, I think one of the best circuits on the calendar. It’s fast, it flows well, the lap is pretty busy. It’s a good circuit and I have good memories of it.
“I was at Toro Rosso last year so we didn’t have too much pressure from a media point of view, certainly not as much as the Red Bull Racing guys, so it was pretty easy from my point of view. But it’s a good atmosphere and the team’s home race is obviously important. However, I don’t think you can let it distract you. It’s just racing in the end and I’ll try to enjoy the weekend as much as possible.
“Last year we stayed about 45 minutes away in a small village, which was actually really nice. It was very quiet, very peaceful but maybe not the easiest place to get to! This year I think we’re staying somewhere a little closer to the track, somewhere a little more efficient in terms of getting to the circuit!”

Lotus
Romain Grosjean

“It’s a fantastic location and a great circuit. The mountains and the fresh air remind me a bit of Switzerland and the track is pretty exciting. It’s not a long lap but it has good character. You’ve got a reasonable start-finish straight, then and uphill section where we’ll appreciate the power of our car. Braking into turn two is fun as it’s uphill so you can brake later than you would otherwise. There’s a second DRS zone then some medium speed corners and you’re back to the start-finish again. Certainly last year we struggled, but this year’s car is so much better that I’m really looking forward to being able to push hard all weekend.
“We have a lot more potential to do well this year. Last year was the first time at the track for Formula One in over a decade and we were doing a lot of learning of the circuit and set-up as well as struggling with a lot of issues with our car at the time. We couldn’t get on top of the tyres and we didn’t have the right package for our brakes so it was a frustrating weekend, not to mention with some reliability issues too! This year we should be so much better placed and I’m really looking forward to being able to attack the track.”
Pastor Maldonado
“It is an interesting circuit and one I enjoyed visiting last year, even if it was a weekend where we didn’t have the best of results. I think we have much better potential this year with the car and we’ve been looking quite strong recently. It’s great to be able to visit a different type of location for a Grand Prix and the event was really impressive last year; I’m looking forward to returning.
“Just like any Grand Prix we’ll be looking to get the maximum from the car. You need good power in Austria especially with the decent hill there. There are a couple of straights and we’ve been looking good through the speed traps so hopefully we’ll keep that pace. If we can qualify well we should have a great race.”
Nick Chester, Technical Director
“There’s nothing to say we can’t perform as we did in Montreal. It’s another medium-downforce track with demands for strong traction, efficient aerodynamics and power unit performance. There are a few more medium-speed corners than in Canada which changes the requirements a bit and there’s every reason to expect the E23 will go pretty well.
“[Last year] it had been a long time since we’d visited the circuit and there was a lot to learn in terms of set-up and our approach to a Grand Prix weekend. Particular lessons learnt included that we underestimated the braking requirements and we found it difficult to get the tyres into their optimal temperature operating window. In both regards we’re far better placed with the E23.”
Federico Gastaldi, Deputy Team Principal
“Looking at the circuit and talking to our drivers and engineers it’s a place that could suit us so we’re feeling quite positive heading there, especially after the E23 showed pretty well in Canada. It’s good to breathe in the fresh air and sample the local delicacies. There are some fabulous sights to be seen and last year’s event was spectacular and it’s great to see what can be done with a strongly promoted event in Europe.”

Sauber
Marcus Ericsson

“I am delighted to be getting back to Austria and especially Spielberg. The atmosphere during the race weekend last year was amazing - it was a great experience. There were a lot of spectators in the grandstands and on the campsites. I like the track a lot, as it is a fast circuit which I am going to enjoy. Overtaking is rather difficult, but there are places where it is possible. I am looking forward to the race weekend.”
Felipe Nasr
“This season it will be my first time driving a Formula One car in Spielberg. I am looking forward to racing there. It is quite a fast circuit, with many long straights combined with some high-speed corners. The last two corners before the start and finish line are my favourites, as they are very quick and you have to drive them very precisely. The long straights could be a benefit for us, but downforce is also required in the high-speed corners. I assume it will be a challenging weekend fighting against our main competitors, but I am confident we will extract the maximum out of our package.”
Giampaolo Dall’Ara, Head of Track Engineering
“The Austrian Grand Prix at Spielberg can be considered, in terms of the set-up and aero configuration of the car, almost as a continuation of the previous race. The balance between the number of corners and lengths of the straights is similar to the Montreal track, yet their nature is substantially different with flowing bends in place of chicanes, and changes of elevation. We also expect that brakes will be a key factor there. For this race weekend the soft and supersoft compounds have been allocated by Pirelli. After an extensive assessment of last week’s achievements, we will direct all our efforts again towards competing at a high level.”

Last edited by jfxavier : 17th June 2015 at 21:47.
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Old 18th June 2015, 06:57   #8
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Default re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Pirelli is bringing the supersoft tyres for this round. And together with that engine update from Canada, Ferrari can have a good go here.

And in other news, Michelin has submitted an application to be F1's new tyre supplier from 2017. Source
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Old 18th June 2015, 13:22   #9
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Default Re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

I think it will be another Hamilton show unless Massa can replicate what he did last year with pole position. Here's hoping for a mixed grid but it seems unlikely. Ferrari will be under threat from Williams this weekend. A car with good straight line speed and low drag is crucial here and Williams really shine in that aspect.
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Old 18th June 2015, 14:00   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deetjohn View Post
And in other news, Michelin has submitted an application to be F1's new tyre supplier from 2017.
With Michelin insisting on 18" rims, the bid is not going to be considered seriously as all the teams and BE are in favour of keeping the 13" wheels which Pirelli don't mind. Maybe they will look attractive for the struggling teams as an opportunity to catch up in case they do a better job at adapting to the new wheels.

The F1 website has completed the series of 5 articles explaining their new feature in F1 Access subscription.

Race Performance Ratings:

Available exclusively to F1® Access subscribers, Formula1.com's live Race Performance Ratings track every input a driver makes in real-time - offering fans unprecedented insight into how the Grand Prix is unfolding.

Five key parameters are measured: Aggression, Braking, Cornering, Steering and Throttle. Each category is determined by the raw telemetry from each driver, but given the sensitive nature of that data the Ratings are expressed as an indexed score, with each driver ranked on a scale of 1-10 based on how they compare to their competitors.

The individual scores for each of the five categories - which update every five seconds throughout the race - are averaged to give an overall Race Performance Rating, which can be tracked live during each race in 2015.

Please see the below links for all 5 articles, which gives quite interesting insights into the above said.

http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...ggression.html

http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...--braking.html

http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...cornering.html

http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...-steering.html

http://www.formula1.com/content/fom-...-throttle.html

Last edited by manson : 20th June 2015 at 18:31. Reason: Please avoid back to back posts by using the edit tab whilst posting within an interval of 20 minutes.
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Old 18th June 2015, 17:50   #11
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Default Re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

The PU usage up to date till Austria.
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Fernando Alonso is set to take a further engine penalty in the Austrian Grand Prix. How many places will depend on what all new parts are being tried out. McLaren have decided to fit the new parts they are bringing in FAs car. Maybe run a back to back comparison with JBs car with old parts. Jenson also might take penalties for PU components change, which will be decided on Friday probably to avoid any penalties at Hungaroring where they might be hoping to score some points.

Source : http://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/al...lty-in-austria

Drivers are given a 10-place grid penalty the first time a fifth of any of the specified six elements of the engine is used, and a further five-place penalty for a fifth of any of the remaining parts.
Honda is said to be set to change two or three of the major parts of the engine, which could mean a 15 or 20-place penalty.
If drivers cannot serve the full penalty as a result of their grid position, then article 28.4 of of the sporting regulations dictates a sliding scale of four penalties to be served during the race, from a five-second time penalty to a 10-second stop-and-go penalty depending on how many grid positions could not be applied.

Last edited by jfxavier : 18th June 2015 at 18:02.
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Old 19th June 2015, 12:13   #12
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Default Re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

Driver's PC

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http://www.fia.com/news/f1-2015-aust...ess-conference

An interesting point in the PC, about Lift & Coast. Looks like the rookie is the only one who is not used to it. F1 always had some sort of "going as slow as possible to finish first" thing..

Q: (Peter Farkas – Auto Motor) A question for all the drivers. We have been hearing a lot about lift and coast since Canada and Mercedes issues a press release in the last couple of days trying to explain what lift and coast was and they stated that from a driving point of view it was not easy to do lift and coast because you have to find a different braking point because of the different speed that you were arriving at the corner. Could you please, as a driver, shed some light on how difficult it is to lift and coast and to find your braking point and also a question specifically to Nico Hulkenberg: Nico, how much lift and coast you have to do at Le Mans?

NH: I think to do lift and coast in Formula One is quite easy – you just left off and coast down. The difficulty is to do it efficiently and to lose as little lap time as possible. Like you say, when you do it your braking point varies, so it’s quite difficult for us to judge, you know, where the actual braking point has moved. To get close to that target, I think that’s the art, that’s what makes it difficult. In WEC we also have quite a bit of lift and coast. They have different fuel regulations, they’re even tighter than here in Formula One, so fuel management is quote crucial there.

Fernando as one of the most experienced drivers can you please explain a little about lift and coast?

FA: Well, as Nico said, there’s not much secret – you lift, you coast to the corner, you brake. We are professional drivers, so we should know where is the point of braking, depends on the speed we arrive. There are other implications on fuel saving – the state of charge, the battery you may have at that point of the race, how much deployment you have on the straights in terms of the K deployment, so yeah, we drive maybe eight or ten different cars in a weekend. We drive low fuel, high fuel, maximum deployment, no deployment, fuel saving, new tyres, old tyres, so there are a variable of four or five seconds in the car during different stages of the free practice, qualifying or the race, so that’s the biggest difficulty, but we are professional drivers, we are ready to do that.

Seb?

SV: Nothing to add.

Nico?

NR: Well, lift and coast is the most efficient way to save fuel, they did it even in the 80s. I remember my dad racing with Alain Prost at McLaren and they had to save fuel because everybody was running out of fuel at the end of the race, so nothing has changed there. Just that it’s become more professional now and more accurate and more detailed. That doesn’t mean… still even if we’re doing that, we’re driving at the absolute limit of the car – it’s just a different kind of driving style, y’know? And even that driving style is very challenging, and you’re still pushing like crazy, you’re just driving a different way. That’s it.

And Carlos, as one of the new guys, Can you explain what your experience is with it?

CS: Yeah, for me something quite new. I have not been used to that… never in my life. And personally, it’s not a thing I really like, especially because I have to do it from very early in the race, probably after the first lap you have already the engineers telling you to lift and coast. I remember Australia was very big, Canada was again very big. You have to adapt and you have to be quick – but probably the amount that I was doing in the last… these two races was probably a bit too much for my opinion. But it’s something that I have to do, something that I have to learn and I will adapt.
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Old 19th June 2015, 15:21   #13
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Default Re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

FP1 :
Vettel and both McLarens struggled with issues.

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Looks like 20 place penalty for Alonso as he has taken a fifth ICE, TC and MGU-H.

The following drivers have taken a new internal combustion engine (ICE):
Daniel Ricciardo (previously used 4) - Penalty to be imposed.
Fernando Alonso (previously used 4) - Penalty to be imposed.
Nico Hülkenberg (previously used 2)
Sergio Perez (previously used 1)

The following drivers have taken a new turbocharger (TC):
Fernando Alonso (previously used 4) - Penalty to be imposed.
Nico Hülkenberg (previously used 2)
Sergio Perez (previously used 1)

The following drivers have taken a new motor generator unit-heat (MGU-H):
Fernando Alonso (previously used 4) - Penalty to be imposed.
Nico Hülkenberg (previously used 2)
Sergio Perez (previously used 1)

The following drivers have taken a new motor generator unit-kinetic (MGU-K):
Fernando Alonso (previously used 2)
Nico Hülkenberg (previously used 2)
Sergio Perez (previously used 1)

The following driver has taken a new control electronics (CE):
Roberto Merhi (previously used 2)
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Old 19th June 2015, 15:22   #14
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An situation for Maurizio Arrivabene at Austrian pitlane

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A bit of a scare in the pit lane for Ferrari team boss Maurizio Arrivabene a few moments ago.

A near miss for the new Ferrari boss. Arrivabene was crossing the pitlane as Massa exited his pitbox and the Brazilian had to slam on the brakes to avoid running him over.

Source : http://www.thisisf1.com/2015/06/19/a...ctice-pitlane/

Cheers!

Vinu
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Old 19th June 2015, 15:48   #15
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Default Re: 2015 Austrian F1 GP - Race Thread

If my memory serves me right, for the first time Ferrari is within .7s of both the Mercs in FP1
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