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Old 26th April 2010, 14:42   #31
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Thanks for the info prince_pervez and salbin for the exact name. Will check out gurji sometime on the weekend.
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Old 18th July 2011, 13:26   #32
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Picked up a 2 Ton Hydraulic Crocodile Jack from Reliance Auto Mart about 2 weeks back.
Similar to the one shown here

MRP. was Rs 1900/- odd. Bargained with the store manager and got it for Rs. 1700/-
Remember you can bargain at the Reliance Auto stores.

About a week back I also got to use it. The left rear type seemed to be punctured and had to stop on a busy road [opp forum]. Parked by a shop and used the new jack.

I was able to jack up the car in a few seconds about 15-30 seconds. And the complete tire change took under 5 minutes. The jacking-up was very easy, but be careful when you jack-down. Unlike the scissor jack, this one comes down very fast. Almost a thump. So make sure you have cleared the underside and don't have anything there like tire covers or the spanner lying there.

Other than that I thought it was a good buy and useful to have around. Works better if you have a good storage space in the care as this take away a good amount of space, if you keep it in its box.
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Old 16th September 2011, 00:19   #33
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I think I'm finally going to invest in this!! Had the most nightmarish experience tonight changing my tire. After the punctured tire was removed the jack suddenly came unstuck and the car came down. From there it was hell. Somehow got another car jack which could creep into another spot and got it sorted. In all of this also misplaced two of the wheel nuts in the ensuing chaos. Miraculously found them in a (thankfully clean enough) small rain water drain. The only saving grace is all this happened within a covered parking at office.
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Old 16th September 2011, 04:04   #34
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have bought 6-7 of these on different occasions for my rally gypsy and for other friends. Rs 750/- from Kashmere gate. Imported, and does the job extremely well - it does take more than 10 seconds to jack up the car and 1 second to jack down.
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Old 21st September 2011, 13:09   #35
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While at it, buy a couple of jack stands too. Jack up with the hydraulic jack and place the stand under the car below a main frame member. It is unsafe to work with just a hydraulic jack - a failure and it comes down lightning fast. Buy min 2 jackstands. With 4, you can have all 4 wheels off.
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Old 21st September 2011, 16:12   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axe77 View Post
I think I'm finally going to invest in this!! Had the most nightmarish experience tonight changing my tire. After the punctured tire was removed the jack suddenly came unstuck and the car came down. From there it was hell. Somehow got another car jack which could creep into another spot and got it sorted. In all of this also misplaced two of the wheel nuts in the ensuing chaos. Miraculously found them in a (thankfully clean enough) small rain water drain. The only saving grace is all this happened within a covered parking at office.
It may be possible to use an electric battery-powered drill to quickly get a scissor jack up to the level of the mount point of your vehicle. A socket adapter (there are stores that sell these so you can import them or buy them off eBay) for your drill can fit your scissor jack but if you can put together a small piece of wood with a slot for a flat screwdriver to run through the holes where you would attach the hook and put the flat-head screwdriver drill bit, raising the drill would be much quicker (you would still have to manually raise the jack after it reaches the mount point) and lowering the jack would be an almost effortless process.

If you tend to lose the wheel nuts, leave them on the windshield cowl (plastic grille below the front windshield) or on the floor of your vehicle (losing them under the floor mats is better than losing them in the rainwater drain).
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Old 22nd September 2011, 13:54   #37
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Originally Posted by Axe77 View Post
After the punctured tire was removed the jack suddenly came unstuck and the car came down.
ALL jacks have to be used safely ie on level ground with the opposite wheels properly chocked. Wheel chocks are ideal but any large stone or wood can be used to wedge the wheels. When a lift is being done, there will be slight movement of the other wheels due to weight balance redistribution and the suspension travel coming into play. Accidents can occur at this stage as the base of the jack may no longer in alignment with the top especially with scissor jacks.

The hydraulic jacks can be of 2 major types - Bottle or Trolley jacks. For personal use, bottle jacks are good as they are compact & can be carried in the cars easily. Trolley jacks are better for professional and car enthusiasts use, if you use it frequently and have a garage or store at home. Bottle jacks have a notoriously small coin shaped lift surface. Depending on your car type and jacking point, you can weld on a couple of thick box sections to get a better platform.

When selecting jacks, see that it has the right clearance to get under the car and the lift to ensure that the wheels are off the ground. This is true for all jacks. Get a good pair of jack stands to take the load of the vehicle after lifting. This ensures that the car is safe to work on and that there is no sudden and catastrophic collapse of the jack. Identifying the lift points are very crucial as the wrong placement in a non frame member area can seriously damage your car's under-body.

Remember that it is better to invest in the best appropriate tools and not the cheapest. Work safely and with full peace of mind.
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Old 1st October 2011, 19:58   #38
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Originally Posted by prince_pervez View Post
Sure Sir.
Here you go. The pics lack light as it was dark and raining. I know I would have got him till 1000 for this piece but I did not haggle more since I was getting late and it was raining quite a bit.
It comes box packed in a plastic case.
I picked up a similar 2 tonne trolley jack for Rs 1050/- (billed, including Rs 50/- tax), from JC Road, Bangalore.
Appears to be Chinese make and quality may vary from piece-to-piece.
In my case - the sample piece on the counter had a severe oil leak and its case was also damaged. The second piece required a bit of hammering to re-adjust the hand lever eye-end.
Point to note is - please check the piece you intend to purchase for:
a) Full extension - should go up almost perpendicular to a height of about 32 cm
b) operate it a couple of times and check for oil leaks in the piston - hydraulic cylinder seals.
c) ensure the jacking lever fits cleanly in the eye end of the jack.
d) check whether the jack is actually able to lift up your car and sustain the pressure - without oil leaks!
e) When storing - deflate all pressure with the nut provided

Not so sure of its longevity though! Members having used it for a few years may comment.

It works quite well indeed - took me all of 10 seconds to jack up the front (heavy side) of my trusty tractor (Indica DLE). Incidentally, the tractor's OEM scissor jack is pathetic, poorly made and barely usable- the handle seems to have been designed by the local village idiot. Its quite a struggle to jack up the little beast using the OEM jack. I had found it easier to jack up the much heavier Sierra, with its better made scissor jack and long ergonomically suited handle.

A final point - already made by other members - keep clear when deflating the pressure - deflation is quite sudden and the whole car comes down with a bit of a thump.

Last edited by Rigid Rotor : 1st October 2011 at 19:59.
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Old 1st October 2011, 20:10   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyBee View Post
Accidents can occur at this stage as the base of the jack may no longer in alignment with the top especially with scissor jacks.

Trolley jacks are better for professional and car enthusiasts use, if you use it frequently and have a garage or store at home.
I haven't had a problem with scissor jacks yet. Perhaps the problem is more pronounced on certain types of vehicles?

BTW, do the wheels on the trolley jacks make them less stable? I feel more confident working on the car if it is resting on a solid surface rather than on a 'trolley'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rigid Rotor View Post
I had found it easier to jack up the much heavier Sierra, with its better made scissor jack and long ergonomically suited handle. A final point - already made by other members - keep clear when deflating the pressure - deflation is quite sudden and the whole car comes down with a bit of a thump.
Why didn't you invest in a good scissor jack? Those are more reliable due to their simpler construction and, if you can get an adapter, you can use an electric drill to raise the jack half-way (i.e. till the jack just reaches the car) and for bringing it all the way down. Besides, the 'thump' feels like it could put undue stress on the suspension if you use the jack often such as if you have a set of alloys and regular tyres that you switch between.
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Old 1st October 2011, 20:25   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k_nitin_r View Post
I haven't had a problem with scissor jacks yet. Perhaps the problem is more pronounced on certain types of vehicles?

BTW, do the wheels on the trolley jacks make them less stable? I feel more confident working on the car if it is resting on a solid surface rather than on a 'trolley'.

Why didn't you invest in a good scissor jack? Those are more reliable due to their simpler construction and, if you can get an adapter, you can use an electric drill to raise the jack half-way (i.e. till the jack just reaches the car) and for bringing it all the way down. Besides, the 'thump' feels like it could put undue stress on the suspension if you use the jack often such as if you have a set of alloys and regular tyres that you switch between.
I think the problem may be with poorly made scissor jacks with inadequately sized handles. The handles need to be long enough and the circle described by the crank handle during cranking should be large enough to reduce the work effort.
The trolley jack is quite stable under load -despite its wheels. However, one is not supposed to work under a vehicle with hydraulic jacks - the vehicle supposed to be supported on jack stays.
Yes the scissor jack is more reliable -however, the hydraulic trolley jack is faster - as to its reliability - let's see how it goes!
The deflation thump is nothing serious for the car or suspension - its just that one should not get in the way!

Last edited by Rigid Rotor : 1st October 2011 at 20:27.
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Old 1st October 2011, 20:37   #41
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You're at 99 posts. One more and you've made the centennial post. I just made my 100th post yesterday (or was it today morning?).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rigid Rotor View Post
However, one is not supposed to work under a vehicle with hydraulic jacks - the vehicle supposed to be supported on jack stands.
Did you get a set of jack stands to go with the hydraulic jack too? I've been looking for a set in Hyderabad for long term vehicle storage (about 3 months) as the tyres go flat and I need to replace them with a set of 4 tyres because of the damage from the vehicle weight on flat tyres over a period of time. I doubt I'll need a trickle charger if the battery is disconnected though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rigid Rotor View Post
Yes the scissor jack is more reliable -however, the hydraulic trolley jack is faster - as to its reliability - let's see how it goes!
If you use the hydraulic jack often, you'll be able to spot any leaks quickly but as a jack stored in the trunk for an emergency (I'm assuming this isn't why you are getting it), it may not fit your need.
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Old 1st October 2011, 21:13   #42
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Originally Posted by k_nitin_r View Post
You're at 99 posts. One more and you've made the centennial post. I just made my 100th post yesterday (or was it today morning?).



Did you get a set of jack stands to go with the hydraulic jack too? I've been looking for a set in Hyderabad for long term vehicle storage (about 3 months) as the tyres go flat and I need to replace them with a set of 4 tyres because of the damage from the vehicle weight on flat tyres over a period of time. I doubt I'll need a trickle charger if the battery is disconnected though.



If you use the hydraulic jack often, you'll be able to spot any leaks quickly but as a jack stored in the trunk for an emergency (I'm assuming this isn't why you are getting it), it may not fit your need.
Nitin, wasn't strictly looking to jack up the 100th post - I'm not much of an active BHPian anyways - however, since you tempt me

Jack stays are available in JC Rd - did not get any though- was planning to use my scissor jack as a stay - in case of need. I'm sure jack-stays are available in the local auto market in Hyd'bad

You point on reliability taken - in any case I plan to hunt for a replacement for the tractor in about a year or so. Will definitely evaluate the new vehicle's OEM scissor jack or try getting a better scissor jack / handle
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Old 2nd October 2011, 08:12   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k_nitin_r View Post
I haven't had a problem with scissor jacks yet. Perhaps the problem is more pronounced on certain types of vehicles?
Scissor jacks, like all jacks are safe when used properly, as you must be doing. But never rely on any jack (with the exception of the Screw Bottle Jack) if you are working under the car. Always invest in a pair of good jack stands. They are not expensive and cut the risk by 99%. The 1%? Inspect the jack stands before every use for stress cracks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k_nitin_r View Post
BTW, do the wheels on the trolley jacks make them less stable? I feel more confident working on the car if it is resting on a solid surface rather than on a 'trolley'.
Trolley jacks are very safe. Its wheels move slightly to compensate for the shift in car weight distribution - something which does not happen with scissor jacks or bottle jacks and the root cause of accidents. But as mentioned earlier, always chock the wheels on the opposite side and use jack stands if you want to work under the car safely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k_nitin_r View Post
Besides, the 'thump' feels like it could put undue stress on the suspension if you use the jack often such as if you have a set of alloys and regular tyres that you switch between.
That 'thump' is nothing compared to the daily beating the suspension takes on our roads. Besides, the better jacks have a foot lever to slow the release and brings down the vehicle very very slowly. It takes some understanding and practice.

Last edited by BusyBee : 2nd October 2011 at 08:23.
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Old 3rd October 2011, 19:12   #44
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Originally Posted by BusyBee View Post
That 'thump' is nothing compared to the daily beating the suspension takes on our roads. Besides, the better jacks have a foot lever to slow the release and brings down the vehicle very very slowly. It takes some understanding and practice.
There's a screw that needs to be turned anti-clockwise to release the jack. You need to practise a little at turning it slowly so the car will be lowered gradually onto the ground. A sudden jerk/twist to the screw and the jack will be released very fast. And trust me, it's not a good thing!
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Old 4th October 2011, 08:14   #45
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Originally Posted by honeybee View Post
There's a screw that needs to be turned anti-clockwise to release the jack. You need to practise a little at turning it slowly so the car will be lowered gradually onto the ground. A sudden jerk/twist to the screw and the jack will be released very fast. And trust me, it's not a good thing!
Right. There is a screw valve and on the better jacks an additional foot lever you use to slow down the release for a very, very gentle landing. You will be amazed with the super smooth landing.

Last edited by BusyBee : 4th October 2011 at 08:16.
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