Go Back   Team-BHP > Team-BHP > Team-BHP Advice > On modifying a car


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 4th February 2017, 10:12   #4606
BHPian
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 150
Thanked: 10 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoshashi View Post
In the link which you provided, its mentioned that this change is applicable for existing models manufactured after 2014. So I don't think running your 2010 WagonR on 0W20 is a good idea.

Quoting from the link
This part is for the transmission oil I believe.

EDIT: It's a bit ambiguous though. Also what's up with this "Ofcourse the Superior one is Synthetic for Best Engine Performance Output - which is available in 0W-40 Grade. Infact Synthetic Oil 0W-40 is Universal Grade of Synthetic Engine Oil - Ideal for all Modern Engines - from Maruti to Audi Range - which provides Optimal Performance and Engine Output for all Kinds of Driving Conditions."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikram Arya View Post
Having spent 22 years in the lubricant sector nothing amazes me more than the kind of misconception that is still floating around both among the end users (car owners) and more often than not also the so called experts (the mechanics) all across, be it India or North America.

The kinematic viscosity of a 0W-20 oil is 8.3cSt* @100C where as it is 13cSt@100C for 0W-40. As you can see a 0W-40 formulation is much more (62.5%) viscous (thicker) than a 0W-20.

*cSt (Centistoke) - Unit of viscosity

Please also note that the operating temperature of your engine hovers in the vicinity of 100C.

The notion that thicker oil is better was never true but 30 years ago it was usually harmless. It isn’t harmless anymore and to understand why, one must understand the oil-to-engine relationship. First and foremost oil has to lubricate moving parts and to do that it must circulate between those parts. The moving parts inside engines are separated by tiny gaps continuously filled with oil. So, rather than rubbing against one another, engine parts move on a thin film of oil. If the oil film goes away due to inadequate “shear strength” or improper thickness, engine damage occurs in seconds.

Oil thickness (viscosity) is vital to engine protection. Oil viscosity recommendations are based on a number of factors, but one of the most critical is the clearance between moving parts. Before the age of computer-controlled machining tools there was a lot of space or uneven spaces between parts. But new CNC machines create parts that fit like the parts in a fine watch. This is about ten times more precise than machined parts of 20/30 years ago. As a necessary condition oil must fill the space between moving parts while simultaneously be able to circulate freely. With smaller, more precise spaces between parts, thinner oils do a better job of flowing freely through the engine while still filling the spaces. Thick oils can fill bigger gaps. That was desirable years ago when the gaps between parts were bigger, but big gaps are history. Thick oil without big gaps disrupts two flow characteristics; oil pressure and oil-flow volume.

Using thicker oil can mislead you into thinking it is better because it increases oil pressure. Higher oil pressure by itself is a good thing, but when it comes at the expense of oil-flow volume. Thicker oil is harder to push through the spaces between parts. This makes the oil pump work harder, which in turn increases oil pressure, but simultaneously decreases oil volume.Too thick oil will result in wonderful oil pressure, yet parts inside the engine could actually be starved for oil due to lowered volume being circulated.

Another down side of using thicker oil is that circulating oil accounts for nearly 50% of engine cooling, so reduced oil-flow reduces cooling causing lubricated parts to operate at higher temperatures. Higher parts temperatures mean more wear.

Too thick or too thin oils can both be bad for engines, but damage is neither immediate nor catastrophic; it just reduces overall engine life. Consider that using improper oil could reduce engine life by a conservative ten thousand kilometers.

And last but not the least this thicker viscosity oil also causes viscous drag and reduces your mileage as the moving parts inside the engine have to overcome the friction caused by the thicker oil.

The notion that a 0W-40 is better than 0W-20 for Indian conditions is also misplaced. Honda/Toyota (and increasingly most of the other OEMs) recommend 0W-20 for all their cars here in North America; the temperature in parts of Southern United States can get as high as 38/39C in summer which is similar to what you can get to in India.

If you’re concerned about the ability of mineral oil to handle the warmer temperatures please use a synthetic formulation within the same viscosity range as specified by the OEM.

Always use the oil within the viscosity range as recommended by the engine manufacturer. Believe it or not, the people who designed and built the engine know more than you and me.

Hope this helps.
"This helps" would be an understatement . Thanks for your detailed reply!! This pretty much confirms my initial views regarding the whole incident. I only decided 0w40 wouldn't be so bad since it was also mentioned in the user manual (picture attached). What I can make of it is that all the three would be tested and the best fuel economy according to them would be from 5w30 (at the time) which they have changed to 0w20 in further revisions. So even if there is adequate lubrication with the 0w40, I wouldn't be getting the maximum fuel economy possible with the oil which I would very much hate.

I think i am going to give the service advisor a piece of my mind regarding this since I anyway have to visit again. Hoping things don't turn ugly but it's time to put the foot down as Leoshashi rightly said. I wouldn't be having this discussion if things had been done according to manufacturer recommendation. I also think they would only be stocking 0w40 hence its use willy nilly... so I am ready for a couple of trips to the facility.

A better idea would be to test my fuel economy first for a couple weeks and then go to them with proof that what they are doing is wrong.
Attached Thumbnails
ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil-oil.jpg  


Last edited by Rudra Sen : 4th February 2017 at 11:05. Reason: back to back posts merged
eternalck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th February 2017, 10:49   #4607
BHPian
 
Vikram Arya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Calgary/Shimla
Posts: 144
Thanked: 348 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by eternalck View Post
"This helps" would be an understatement . Thanks for your detailed reply!! This pretty much confirms my initial views regarding the whole incident. I only decided 0w40 wouldn't be so bad since it was also mentioned in the user manual (picture attached). What I can make of it is that all the three would be tested and the best fuel economy according to them would be from 5w30 (at the time) which they have changed to 0w20 in further revisions. So even if there is adequate lubrication with the 0w40, I wouldn't be getting the maximum fuel economy possible with the oil which I would very much hate.

I think i am going to give the service advisor a piece of my mind regarding this since I anyway have to visit again. Hoping things don't turn ugly but it's time to put the foot down as Leoshashi rightly said. I wouldn't be having this discussion if things had been done according to manufacturer recommendation. I also think they would only be stocking 0w40 hence its use willy nilly... so I am ready for a couple of trips to the facility.

A better idea would be to test my fuel economy first for a couple weeks and then go to them with proof that what they are doing is wrong.
I'm glad I could be of some help.

My suggestion is to buy a jug of 5W-30 from an authorized dealer & get your oil changed from a MASS instead of going to this place. If these guys are not stocking the subject grade it unlikely that they will make an exception.

As Leoshashi has pointed out; pushing incorrect information is a malaise that is prevalent largely in this sector across the board. The reason that these people are able to get away with this is because 1) commercial consideration (lowering inventory carrying cost), 2) customers are mostly unaware 3) customers are disinterested and sometimes both.

I'm also surprised by the numerous changes in the oil specs by Maruti so frequently. Out here most of the OEMs (American/Japenses/Korean) follow one or at the most two (rare) viscosity ranges (0W-20/5W-20/5W-30) across their entire portfolio that some times includes more 10 engine types.

I'm sure with more customer awareness coupled with higher level of technician training by the OEMs things will improve steadily in India.

All the best!
Vikram Arya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th February 2017, 11:01   #4608
BHPian
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 150
Thanked: 10 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikram Arya View Post
I'm glad I could be of some help.

My suggestion is to buy a jug of 5W-30 from an authorized dealer & get your oil changed from a MASS instead of going to this place. If these guys are not stocking the subject grade it unlikely that they will make an exception.

As Leoshashi has pointed out; pushing incorrect information is a malaise that is prevalent largely in this sector across the board. The reason that these people are able to get away with this is because 1) commercial consideration (lowering inventory carrying cost), 2) customers are mostly unaware 3) customers are disinterested and sometimes both.

I'm also surprised by the numerous changes in the oil specs by Maruti so frequently. Out here most of the OEMs (American/Japenses/Korean) follow one or at the most two (rare) viscosity ranges (0W-20/5W-20/5W-30) across their entire portfolio that some times includes more 10 engine types.

I'm sure with more customer awareness coupled with higher level of technician training by the OEMs things will improve steadily in India.

All the best!
Just had a chat with the advisor who incidentally called me because they had billed one instead of 2 rear shock absorbers , he gave me explanations ranging from we put this oil all across the board to 0w20 is not available in synthetic to maruti recommends 0w40.. I told him if they do recommend then send me their notice/whatever to which he said they only recommend..

Safe to say getting them to replace for free is not going to be a simple affair. By the way the place IS a MASS from magic auto. I am going to contact suzuki directly and see what the hell is going on...
eternalck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th February 2017, 11:08   #4609
Distinguished - BHPian
 
sgiitk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Kanpur
Posts: 7,089
Thanked: 3,648 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by devarshi84 View Post
Maruti also suggests 0w-20 and 5w-30 for its cars. But using these oils will do more damage under severe and long city driving conditions or for cars with high mileage. Damage includes, small leaks, engine wear and tear, more sludge, less protection under stress and affects to general performance and may increase in case the oil is burnt leading to less pressure which is already low with a thinner oil. Positives of a thinner oil are usually a good cold start lubrication in winter and more Fuel Economy when it suits the car.

Again, thinner oils are measured to perform better in engines with very tight clearances in new cars. Old cars do not have these. I am personally using a 0w-20 in my Honda Jazz but would not use it in my Lancer which sees a thicker 5w-30 (HTHS of 3.5 or more)

A thick 5w-30/10w-30 (10w-30 can be thinner than 5w-30 in some brands) or a regular 5w-40/10w-40 are good regular options.

These are the usual recommendations in manuals which go up to 50 grade for nations like India.
I am wondering which world you are living in. You appear to be confused.

As stated by me and many others an oil which is mmWnn is mm only when COLD and as it warms up it thins down to nn only (yes, all oils thin down with heating). Yes, when warming up oils do thin down. 0W is a misnomer like a 0W bulb! so 0W is just thinner than, say, SAE 5 or whatever. What decides the oil rating is the second no. and not the first. The rule of - lower no can go below the specs, but the higher number must be equal to or higher than the specs.

At one time (mid 70's) oil was fraudulently being labelled as mm - nnW even in Europe. This meant it could be mm which amounted to nn Winter Grade.

It is nn which decides what is the safe oil for a vehicle when hot and running. As corectly surmised by you Lancer engines were not made to the same tight tolerances as a Jazz engine, so needed a thicker oil. if the oil is too thin then metal will rub metal with disastrous consequences. Have you forgotten the good old FIAT / Padmini which specified a straight SAE50 oil!

I did not go down to below SAE30 even in my Santro or Accent. The engines were old technology.

Last edited by sgiitk : 4th February 2017 at 11:11.
sgiitk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th February 2017, 13:28   #4610
BHPian
 
hothatchaway's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 502
Thanked: 487 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikram Arya View Post
Having spent 22 years in the lubricant sector nothing amazes me more than the kind of misconception that is still floating around both among the end users (car owners) and more often than not also the so called experts (the mechanics) all across, be it India or North America.
While I found this piece to be quite informative, however, I felt the paragraph below

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikram Arya View Post
The notion that thicker oil is better was never true but 30 years ago it was usually harmless. It isn’t harmless anymore and to understand why, one must understand the oil-to-engine relationship. First and foremost oil has to lubricate moving parts and to do that it must circulate between those parts. The moving parts inside engines are separated by tiny gaps continuously filled with oil. So, rather than rubbing against one another, engine parts move on a thin film of oil. If the oil film goes away due to inadequate “shear strength” or improper thickness, engine damage occurs in seconds.
to sharply contradict with the para below -


Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikram Arya View Post
Too thick or too thin oils can both be bad for engines, but damage is neither immediate nor catastrophic; it just reduces overall engine life. Consider that using improper oil could reduce engine life by a conservative ten thousand kilometers.
...in terms of the end result to the state of the engine. If you say that an incorrect grade oil reduces the lifespan of the engine by a percentage which is in single digit (most modern engines can comfortably run north of 2 lakh kilometres with nothing more than regular service), then is it that serious an issue, when the kind of driving conditions that obtains in most of our cities, can reduce the lifespan of the overall vehicle even further?

I for one am particular about the grade of oil to be used in my car and have always bought and supplied my own oil to the service centre. Of course I am no expert in this area.
hothatchaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th February 2017, 18:18   #4611
Senior - BHPian
 
devarshi84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ahmedabad - Tor
Posts: 3,996
Thanked: 118 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by eternalck View Post
Hi, couldn't find a regular small questions thread so posting here:

Had the 50K KM service done for my trusty '12 wagonr, decided to go in for synthetic oil this time; for the first time ever after the service I noticed it running much more effortlessly climbing out of mall basements on the second gear and I was really happy.

I just reread the owner's manual and 0w20 is the oil which has been recommended, checked the invoice and it mentions 0w40 (which I believe is more viscous than 5w30 which was in it earlier). I should have read up before going in for the service, i know.

The service was carried out at a magic auto authorised center in Delhi.

Now I have read all types of conflicting information on the interwebs... can anyone here please provide a definitive recommendation?

Thanks!
a 0w-40 is not going to do any damage. It will just run better. Your FE will be lower including your pickup but your engine will sound quiet and healthy. A part of this is the placebo effect due to the thicker oil which quietens the sounds. It is ok to run this oil

MGO's use 0w-20 and 5w-30 depending on availability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgiitk View Post
I am wondering which world you are living in. You appear to be confused.

As stated by me and many others an oil which is mmWnn is mm only when COLD and as it warms up it thins down to nn only (yes, all oils thin down with heating). Yes, when warming up oils do thin down. 0W is a misnomer like a 0W bulb! so 0W is just thinner than, say, SAE 5 or whatever. What decides the oil rating is the second no. and not the first. The rule of - lower no can go below the specs, but the higher number must be equal to or higher than the specs.

At one time (mid 70's) oil was fraudulently being labelled as mm - nnW even in Europe. This meant it could be mm which amounted to nn Winter Grade.

It is nn which decides what is the safe oil for a vehicle when hot and running. As corectly surmised by you Lancer engines were not made to the same tight tolerances as a Jazz engine, so needed a thicker oil. if the oil is too thin then metal will rub metal with disastrous consequences. Have you forgotten the good old FIAT / Padmini which specified a straight SAE50 oil!

I did not go down to below SAE30 even in my Santro or Accent. The engines were old technology.
I said the same thing. I am not going to pour a 0w-20 or 0w-30 in my Lancer. infact I have seen some people use a 50 grade. For a car with 150000 kms, I might even recommend not going below 5w-40 in the first place depending on how it is driven.
devarshi84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2017, 18:29   #4612
BHPian
 
aerohit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: India
Posts: 835
Thanked: 531 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

In last 6 months I tested 2 new oils, 1 pending. All are semi synthetic.

1) ZIC X7 5w30
2) Motul 4100 Power 5w30
3) Eneos 5w30

ZICs performance was poor because mileage went down.
Motul is better, this is what I am currently using in my Honda.
Eneos is Japans worlds best brand, and possibly worlds best brand. Will test it near future.

Eneos is not available easily though I was able get it It is manufactured by Tide Water in India with collaboration with Eneos Japan. My supplier is also soon to receive 'Eneos Sustina', which is 100% synthetic high grade oil, imported from Japan.

Both Motul and Eneos are known to have good additive package.



Always refer owners manual to never exceed quantity of oil. If it says 3L, buy 3L and not 3.5L.

Last edited by aerohit : 5th February 2017 at 18:30.
aerohit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th February 2017, 07:59   #4613
BHPian
 
Vikram Arya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Calgary/Shimla
Posts: 144
Thanked: 348 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hothatchaway View Post
While I found this piece to be quite informative, however, I felt the paragraph below

to sharply contradict with the para below -

...in terms of the end result to the state of the engine. If you say that an incorrect grade oil reduces the lifespan of the engine by a percentage which is in single digit (most modern engines can comfortably run north of 2 lakh kilometres with nothing more than regular service), then is it that serious an issue, when the kind of driving conditions that obtains in most of our cities, can reduce the lifespan of the overall vehicle even further?

I for one am particular about the grade of oil to be used in my car and have always bought and supplied my own oil to the service centre. Of course I am no expert in this area.
I don’t see the contradiction.

The broad idea that I’m driving at is that we need to use the engine oil of grade/viscosity range recommended by the OEM. If you fail to do that, it will result in long term damage to the car’s engine that may not seem to be catastrophic & immediate.

Your argument is akin to “we know the pollution in our cities will kill us anyway so we might as well have a nice time and have greasy/spicy food”.

5% reduction in engine life is HUGE by my yardstick (by the way some of my friends have Honda Civics & BMWs (both 3 & 5 series) that are inching towards 400,000 kms mark) and I assume a lot of fellow members feel the same.

Incorrect grade of oil will also affect your fuel economy by as much as 10% (depending upon high thick is the formulation that you’re using). To put things into perspective if you are going to use 10,000 ltr. of diesel over 200,000 kms (assuming your car gets a mileage of 20 kms a ltr. and diesel is Rs 65/ltr.) then a 10% reduction in fuel economy would translate into a potential loss Rs. 65,000; pretty steep I will say.

I don't profess to be an expert, all of us learn everyday; I used to handle automotive lubricants portfolio a number of years ago.

At the end of the day what differentiates us BHPians from the average Joe is the fact that we will do everything within our means to keep our vehicle in ship shape to improve its longevity and that includes using the right product even if means picking our fellow forum members' brains' endlessly on topics close to our hearts and that I assume was one of the founding principles of the this forum.

Last edited by Vikram Arya : 6th February 2017 at 08:14.
Vikram Arya is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 6th February 2017, 12:54   #4614
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 2,956
Thanked: 5,882 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hothatchaway View Post
...in terms of the end result to the state of the engine. If you say that an incorrect grade oil reduces the lifespan of the engine by a percentage which is in single digit (most modern engines can comfortably run north of 2 lakh kilometres with nothing more than regular service), then is it that serious an issue, when the kind of driving conditions that obtains in most of our cities, can reduce the lifespan of the overall vehicle even further?
As a rule of thumb, always use oil as specified by the manufacturer. If not available, try to get the one nearest to it. Personally I don’t believe there is a whole lot of difference between the various oils manufacturers. Or to be more precise, I think it would be extremely difficult to measure real differences in wear and tear in a meaningful way.

If you are concerned about wear and tear of your engine, lets look at what causes the most wear and tear in the first place. Obviously, lubracting oil has a huge role to play. But given that one has the correct, or as near as possible, oil in one’s engine, there are a few other factors that have much more effect on wear and tear.

- Temperature of the engine
- Air filter
- Oil filter

Remarkably, whereas tonnes of information is spewed out on the internet by oil guru’s about oil specification, very little is written about these three element. That’s rather odd, because even with the best oil (whatever that might be) these three have a huge influence on wear and tear..

Engine temperature is critical for longevity of you engine. Most engine wear takes place during start up and the minutes following start up where the engine parts, notably the cilinders are still not up to normal operating temperature. That also means the oil won’t adhere and spread across the cilinder surface, causing wear and tear.

That’s the reason why cars that are used for short runs tend to have more wear and tear on the engine than ones that do mostly long drives.

Especially in dusty environments such as often found in many places in India, checking and replacing your air filter often, is a good idea. Not only will a clogged air filter reduce fuel economy, engine power, but inevitable it also affects engine wear and tear. Even more importantly, there are a lot of pretty pathetic air filters on the market. The effect of a poorly fitting or poorly designed air filter are much more pronounced than getting an oil that is one step up or below the manufacturer recommend one.

Living in Delhi I had to replace my air filter on my Royal Enfield Bullet at least every 1000km!

Same is true with oil filters. Typically car manufacturer recommend and oil change and filter change at the same time. Truth is that typically the oil is still fine, but the filter really needs replacing. When it comes to filter quality, the same is true as for the air filter. Lots of filters around with dubious qualities.

There are dozens of youtube films about oil filters, have a look at this one:



So maybe we should have a dedicated thread on oil filters?

Coming back to your original question. Wear and tear on an engine is a cumulative affect based on all of the above and some more. I don’t think you can capture it in any mathematical function as such. Experience shows that most cars run happily well over 200.000 kilometers when sticking to normal maintenance routine. That means oil/oil filter changes as per the manufacturer frequency and using oil and parts as per the manufacturer specification.

So unless you plan to keep your car way over 200K engine wear and tear is simply not an issue. So spending money on all these so called “better oils” is unlikely to give you a benefit, other than a warm feeling of comfort for oneself.

However, it is very beneficial for guys like me, as I rarely buy a car with less than 200K on the clock. So I like to see all those invoices for fancy oils and as many miles in as short as possible time possible, (which means no short drives!)

But seriously, use the correct oil, check your air filter regularly and think about what oil filter is being used. You’ll be fine.

Jeroen
Jeroen is offline   (4) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 7th February 2017, 08:53   #4615
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pune
Posts: 2,375
Thanked: 1,047 Times
Default Re: Suzuki service center has used the wrong oil for my wagonR...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
But seriously, use the correct oil, check your air filter regularly and think about what oil filter is being used. You’ll be fine.
Good points; and by correct oil, add to that the word "genuine". Also important is the need to change oil at least as often as recommended by the car maker, including adhering to what some specify for severe conditions that include short trips because these allow more contaminants to stay floating in the oil because the drives are not long enough for the oil to heat enough to boil these away.
Sawyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th February 2017, 14:06   #4616
Senior - BHPian
 
devarshi84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ahmedabad - Tor
Posts: 3,996
Thanked: 118 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

There is no such thing as a 'genuine' oil if you picked that word from the service center. There is a suitable oils and an unsuitable oils.

There is no one size fits all magic oil available with any vehicle maker.
devarshi84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th February 2017, 15:24   #4617
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pune
Posts: 2,375
Thanked: 1,047 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Genuine as in the opposite of spurious. Still a high risk of the latter in parts of the country, I suspect.
Sawyer is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 14th February 2017, 00:21   #4618
BHPian
 
anycatd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Ponda,Goa
Posts: 296
Thanked: 141 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Do the MASS allow usage of engine oils outside their dealership? I want to replace the oil on our third service with Liqui Moly one. Will it void my warranty? I am not convinced with the Castrol oils they use. Also heard from a FIAT trained technician that the Castrol oils in India are not of the same quality as in the west. He runs a garage for his passion of FIAT cars. Since our Brezza is also FIAT driven I've taken his advice and will use a European manufactured oil.

Last edited by GTO : 15th February 2017 at 09:42. Reason: Castro -> Castrol. Thanks.
anycatd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th February 2017, 00:59   #4619
Senior - BHPian
 
Leoshashi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: India
Posts: 1,769
Thanked: 8,686 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by anycatd View Post
Do the MASS allow usage of engine oils outside their dealership? I want to replace the oil on our third service with Liqui Moly one. Will it void my warranty? I am not convinced with the Castrol oils they use. Also heard from a FIAT trained technician that the Castrol oils in India are not of the same quality as in the west. He runs a garage for his passion of FIAT cars. Since our Brezza is also FIAT driven I've taken his advice and will use a European manufactured oil.
The dealer workshops and MSM's will rarely allow outside oil. Though you can try asking your SA once. The non dealer MASS usually allow outside oil.

Last edited by GTO : 15th February 2017 at 09:43. Reason: Quoted post edited :)
Leoshashi is offline   (3) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 14th February 2017, 02:43   #4620
Senior - BHPian
 
hserus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Chennai
Posts: 1,762
Thanked: 1,717 Times
Default Re: ARTICLE: Synthetic oil vs Mineral oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoshashi View Post
The dealer workshops and MSM's will rarely allow outside oil. Though you can try asking your SA once. The non dealer MASS usually allow outside oil.
Get your oil changed elsewhere and then turn up at the MASS. Don't take outside oil and land up at the MASS. That should take care of it.
hserus is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Where to buy Mobil1 / Castrol Synthetic Oil in Mumbai? Max Shifting gears 27 14th June 2015 23:41
Synthetic Oil in Bangalore epyupc Modifications & Accessories 49 29th May 2015 15:03
Oil change..Synthetic, where to source DRC Technical Stuff 21 2nd December 2007 15:00
Synthetic Oil karthik247 Technical Stuff 10 8th November 2005 18:02


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 11:45.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks