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Old 25th November 2011, 12:58   #1
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Default Re Sleeving the cylinder of a 2 Stroke Engine

I went through the whole forum and couldn't get much proper info of how is the re-sleeving of the cylinder done. I tried searching on the internet too and got the basic knowledge that a new sleeve is fitted into the cylinder using the specialized lathe machine.

But in this specific (cylinder) thread i would love if someone who has done sleeving of the engine and throw some light on why it is or isn't recommended.

I have had mixed reactions from people saying that the re sleeved standard cylinder is not at par with the stock std cylinder, performance wise. But i am yet to understand why?

Bike Guru's kindly share the info. (Basically i want to know about a 2 stroke engine Re Sleeving, but even if any other bike has been re sleeved, i would really appreciate them sharing the experience)

Thanks in advance, Cheers !!
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Old 25th November 2011, 13:59   #2
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

resleeve if you can't get the next oversize piston or if the final oversize is worn out and you can't get a new barrel / cylinder. I've resleeved my BMW's years ago.
for a two stroke the ports need to be cut before the sleeve is inserted into the cylinder. If you want to see how it's done you can visit my friend at his shivaji park workshop.
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Old 25th November 2011, 16:48   #3
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

Sure where is he located tell me?
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Old 25th November 2011, 17:13   #4
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

As per my understanding goes:

Re-sleeving is done when the engine loses compression, and the new rings are not able to sustain the compression. Usually, in two strokes, the engine is bored further and a bigger piston is used, but when this is not available or when the cylinder cannot be bored further, sleeves are inserted.

I'm not entirely sure about the advantages and disadvantages, but what I'm sure is that a LOT depend on the machinery and skill or workmanship of the entire process. If properly done, I don't see any reason to be worried about the performance.

My 540 might need it in a year or two. Will share the complete details then.

Last edited by dhanushs : 25th November 2011 at 17:16.
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Old 25th November 2011, 18:22   #5
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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Sure where is he located tell me?
He's definitely walking about "Mahesh Turning Works". Located at Road No.5 in Shivaji Park.
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Old 25th November 2011, 18:24   #6
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

Re-Sleeving is considered when the bore is damaged/worn out and spare cylinders are not available. I have seen this done during reconditioning of a Govt bus. There are some concerns ranging from metallurgical properties of the new sleeve, ovality, and also a very important is heat transfer, if the machining is not done to the right specs and the inner surface of the cylinder and the other surface of the sleeve must match. Bad machining causes Air gaps, which kill heat transfer.
2 strokes are very difficult to re-sleeve as the ports have to match. The liner is 1st ported with according the company specs, the ports are intentionally made smaller and are grinded later to match the ports on the cylinder. Many international companies like LA sleeves manufacture and install sleeves.

Wet liners don't have too much of the heat transfer issue.

For FAQ click here

A video of re-sleeving by Ken Konnar racing


Last edited by motorpsycho : 25th November 2011 at 18:29.
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Old 25th November 2011, 20:36   #7
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

It depends on the engine. Some newer ones, like Kawasaki, have non-sleevable blocks.

Some more specifics should be posted for a proper suggestion.
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Old 25th November 2011, 20:52   #8
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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It depends on the engine. Some newer ones, like Kawasaki, have non-sleevable blocks.
.
If the block is an aluminium cast chances of resleeving is very less/bleak. From my limited experience we did try out sleeving for RD 350 barrels way back in 1999. We did notice that a well made sleeve can meet/exceed performance of the stock one if done well.
Applying a metal sleeve can be for various reasons, could be as simple as non-availability of cylinder jugs, exhausting all over sizes and you are staring at the last size, non availability of right piston size.
The quality of base metal needs to be right one and more importantly it has to be tempered well. Matching of ports would be the next hygiene quality.

Better reading can be found on this link as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylinder_(engine)
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Old 25th November 2011, 21:01   #9
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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Originally Posted by ku69rd View Post
If the block is an aluminium cast chances of resleeving is very less/bleak. From my limited experience we did try out sleeving for RD 350 barrels way back in 1999. We did notice that a well made sleeve can meet/exceed performance of the stock one if done well.
Applying a metal sleeve can be for various reasons, could be as simple as non-availability of cylinder jugs, exhausting all over sizes and you are staring at the last size, non availability of right piston size.
The quality of base metal needs to be right one and more importantly it has to be tempered well. Matching of ports would be the next hygiene quality.

Better reading can be found on this link as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylinder_(engine)
Metallurgy is only one issue; there are several special coatings on the original liner out on the market by various manufacturers that are designed to work with the piston and help wear and lubricity, and they cannot be replicated by the sleeve. This leads to short life thereafter of the rings and pistons.
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Old 25th November 2011, 21:11   #10
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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Originally Posted by VCheng View Post
Metallurgy is only one issue; there are several special coatings on the original liner out on the market by various manufacturers that are designed to work with the piston and help wear and lubricity, and they cannot be replicated by the sleeve. This leads to short life thereafter of the rings and pistons.
Well buddie, what i told was of the superficial layer and presume it should be good enough for a common man (like me) to get a fair bit of understanding. But yes there are more intricacies when it comes to modern engines. You have titanium coated piston rings/ other coatings to derive such performances which were seen post 70's.
Regarding the replication part, 2 strokers are straight forward engines and can be replicated without much of a hitch.
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Old 25th November 2011, 21:37   #11
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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Originally Posted by dhanushs View Post
My 540 might need it in a year or two. Will share the complete details then.
If youre talking about the mm540 peugeot diesel engine, well then it has wet liners. The new one comes as a set with piston & rings from Mahindra itself. the old ones are removed and new ones inserted
been there doen that hence I know
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Old 25th November 2011, 21:49   #12
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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Originally Posted by The Great View Post
got the basic knowledge that a new sleeve is fitted into the cylinder using the specialized lathe machine.
Thanks in advance, Cheers !!
umm I have to let you know it's a boring machine which bores the cylinder out. a hydraulic press is used to insert the liner in to the bored out cyl, and also used to press out an old inserted liner. Then the inserted sleeve is bored and honed.
The outside of the liner can be cut on a lathe to get it to 1 thou oversize of the inside of the cylinder. It maybe more than 1 thou I'm not sure what the difference is.

How good a job is will depend on how proper the tolerances are, between the bored out cylinder and the outer of the liner. And also on what kind of liner and the quality of the liner.

I've done this on my bikes in 1982 when I was a teenager. I couldn't get oversize pistons and the bore was worn out a lot. Now I have new pistons of a Ford V8 1938 model that I can slip into the cyclinder by boring out the liner I inserted then,. I would like to use new STOTT's sleeve but my pal says the old ones will do.


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Sure where is he located tell me?
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
He's definitely walking about "Mahesh Turning Works". Located at Road No.5 in Shivaji Park.
Okay yes I didn't want to name anyone cos I wasn't sure if people wouldn't think I was promoting him.

Last edited by deutscheafrikar : 25th November 2011 at 21:51.
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Old 25th November 2011, 21:56   #13
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

Man i am so blessed to be a part of this community.... These quick responses are a boon to bike-kind.

I will surely find out about Mahesh tuning works... Btw i am specifically looking for my Yamaha 135 - 5 speed engine. I have got really so many confusing answers from people all round but now the specific study has shown me what to do.

More-so the thread does shed light on the re sleeving option as the cylinders of older vehicles are rare to find.. for ex my friends old Morris for which now we are planning a omni engine. But if resleeving is a possibility then there is nothing like it.

Last edited by The Great : 25th November 2011 at 22:00.
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Old 25th November 2011, 22:02   #14
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder

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I will surely find out about Mahesh tuning works... Btw i am specifically looking for my Yamaha 135 - 5 speed engine. I have got really so many confusing answers from people all round but now the specific study has shown me what to do.
Buddie, you ought to get the RX 135 barrels which would still be in stock with a few spare parts shops. Do let me know if you need any help in sourcing one and I can check with a few guys who might be having them.
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Old 26th November 2011, 07:15   #15
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Default Re: Re Sleeving the cylinder of a 2 Stroke Engine

Sleeving when done right runs as well if not better than stock. I'm running a sleeved cylinder since a year (was re-sleeved a month ago). I'm using a sleeve that is harder than stock sleeves, hence I get more life out of them. However, the ports have to be matched to get the same performance. I spent around 3 days with various files to fix the ports, harder sleeve does not help at all.
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