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Old 13th May 2012, 20:26   #46
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

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Originally Posted by avinash_clt View Post
This is my experience of tyres I've used on my TBTS.




I can vouch for the quality of ceat secura sport tyres. Had 3.25-19" at the front for my TBTS for my leh trip. It was brilliant, much better than stock MRF ones. They dont produce it now? Its a perfect choice for bulls , go for 3.5-19" for the rear if you can get your hands on one. Its not the most comfortable tyre out there, but its rugged, fairly grippy and a good dual purpose tyre. Infact the 3.25-19" are the most preferred front tyres for all the enfields i've seen on my trip. They wear out very slowly also.

I think you must be referring to the Pirelli MT60 100/90 tyres. I had them on TBTS for the leh trip. Its actually a front tyre but i used them on the rear. The tyre gave excellent manners to the bike both on and off the road. They're originally tubeless tyres. Costed me around 3k. But lasted a total of only 5500 kms ( a good 3000km was on the trip). I think its not worth to have it for tarmac use, unless you dont ride often.



True, I've also found Ceat tyres to be much better than the MRFs. Escpecially the Secura Sport line-up. Have found them better than mrf meteors and dunlop unigrip



Michelin Sirac is also an excellent tyre for the new C500, C350 etc. 120/80 - 18 for the rear is an excellent choice over the stock MRF. Impressive off -road manners as well.



3.25-19 (for front)

1.Stock mrf with rib pattern
2.Ceat Secura Sport

3.5-19 (for rear)

1. Stock mrf
2. Ceat secura sport (availability i'm not so sure)
3. Dunlop Unigrip (not as good as ceat ones)
4. Dunlop Challenger

100/90 - 19 (for rear)

1. Pirelli MT60 (actually recommended as front tyres, wears out pretty quick, but excellent grip on and off the road)
Very similar thoughts we share on 19 inchers.
Yes, the Secura Sports is no longer manufactured for 19 inch rims. I checked quite a bit and made an official from CEAT Headoffice call few depots as well. This was almost 2 years ago. Since I wanted it that bad because of my good experience with it.

I was running a 3.00/19 Secura Sport on the front wheel for sometime but got rid of it because it was too skinny for a Bullet. It was Rajdoots 175 front tire size.
Now I am running a Dunlop UniGrip 3.25 on my 500's front which is good but not as good as the CEAT. One issue I faced was that the middle thread did not wear as much as the side row of threads which fouled the handling. So I ran it on my rear wheel and did a 700kms trip which sorted that out and its back on the front wheel.

True about the Pirelli, it is a MT60 and yes I did run it in the front for a while with the Meteor behind. It was a perfect combo and the bike felt like it was on tracks on high speeds curves. Now its running at the rear.
I am surpirsed it lasted just 5000 odd kms. Mine has run close to 4000kms and I dont find any wear as yet. Of course my use is more of highways and city runs. I guess it is a soft compound tire.

One positive thing about the Meteor was it never locked up under hard breaking at whatever speeds. I had to swap it to my 350's rear since the side walls had widened out over use and the 500's swing arm is supposedly narrower than the 350's.

I would like to know more about the Dunlop Challenger so I can get one for my next swap.
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Old 14th May 2012, 11:23   #47
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

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Yes, the Secura Sports is no longer manufactured for 19 inch rims. I checked quite a bit and made an official from CEAT Headoffice call few depots as well. This was almost 2 years ago......

..True about the Pirelli, it is a MT60 and yes I did run it in the front for a while with the Meteor behind. It was a perfect combo and the bike felt like it was on tracks on high speeds curves. Now its running at the rear.
I am surpirsed it lasted just 5000 odd kms. Mine has run close to 4000kms and I dont find any wear as yet. Of course my use is more of highways and city runs. I guess it is a soft compound tire. ....

...I would like to know more about the Dunlop Challenger so I can get one for my next swap.
But i got my 3.25-19" secura sport, tube+tyre combo for Rs2100 during last may from the local ceat shoppe. It must be old stock then, i'm not sure. Havent checked recently abt their availabilty. Also they were pretty sure then also that i wouldnt get them in 3.50-19", though ceat website mentioned about their availabilty.

I havent seen the Dunlop Challenger on any bull yet.

Yeh the pirellis wore out very quickly. They're soft compound tyres. I used them at the rear only, through the rough ladakh terrain and that should have contributed greatly to the increased wear. But for the time it was on, the bike had much better handling and braking characteristics. The centre of the tyre wore out completely while the treads on the sides still had around 70% depth left.

About your 500. Yours is a machismo500 or a std500? On my trip there were M500s running on rear 18" light weight (aluminium alloy combo or sth) rims and michelin sirac 120/80 -18 tyres which i believe was without any modification to the swingarm.
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Old 14th May 2012, 12:38   #48
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

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Originally Posted by avinash_clt View Post
But i got my 3.25-19" secura sport, tube+tyre combo for Rs2100 during last may from the local ceat shoppe. It must be old stock then, i'm not sure. Havent checked recently abt their availabilty. Also they were pretty sure then also that i wouldnt get them in 3.50-19", though ceat website mentioned about their availabilty.

I havent seen the Dunlop Challenger on any bull yet.

Yeh the pirellis wore out very quickly. They're soft compound tyres. I used them at the rear only, through the rough ladakh terrain and that should have contributed greatly to the increased wear. But for the time it was on, the bike had much better handling and braking characteristics. The centre of the tyre wore out completely while the treads on the sides still had around 70% depth left.

About your 500. Yours is a machismo500 or a std500? On my trip there were M500s running on rear 18" light weight (aluminium alloy combo or sth) rims and michelin sirac 120/80 -18 tyres which i believe was without any modification to the swingarm.
Mine is a 96' 500 and have 2002 Electra.
Yes few places did have the 3.25 Secura Sport which was probably last few tyres left.
I want to keep the stock rims which is why I am looking for different tires. Since most of the new Enfield models come with 18 inch, the possibilty of a new 19 inch tyre becomes even less.
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Old 27th July 2012, 00:39   #49
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Default My learnings:

Disclaimer: Most of my learnings which I have mentioned below are not all by my own experience but the knowledge which I got by doing some search on internet and different forums like Xbhp,Bcmtouring and Team-bhp. Also a lot of guys on these forums have helped me with their own experience and rich knowledge. I am thankful to all these guys for enriching my knowledge. I would also encourage if you all guys could add-more to the knowledge pool here on this forum. I would also like to state that much of the information below,would be already known to you but I am just penning it down here so that for people who are new to tyres can get consolidated information in this post and need not go through the trouble of reading a lot of material on internet.

Most of the average joes like me usually dont find much trouble with their tyres on dry tarmac but they find problem while off-roading, going over slush, gravel and loose soil. Off these the most encountered problem where you will find many people complaining is the grip of tyres in wet conditions on-road where we do the most driving. The grip in wet conditions reduces as much as 2/3rd of the dry grip on tarmac.
While selecting tyres we need to consider the following points:
1) What type of grip you want - Dry, Wet tarmac, Slush, Gravel, loose soil ?/Type and depth of tread pattern.
2) Tubeless or tubetype
3) Load rating.
4) Rim size.
5) Clearance between Swing arm and the tyre. Extent of Modifications required to fit in your favourite fatter tyre.
6) Compound of tyre (Soft/Hard) used in manufacturing the tyre.
7) Profile of tyre - Round/Flat.
8) Width of tyre/Wider contact patch.

1) What type of grip you want - Dry, Wet tarmac, Slush, Gravel, loose soil ?
If you want dry grip on tarmac you need tyres which would give maximum contact area with the road that means a tyre with no tread grooves at all! also called Slick tyres as used in racing.Slick tyres also require a lot of warm up before they start gripping so they are nearly banned for on-road usage.These tyres will be quite bad in wet on-road conditions also because they dont have any grooves which will draining out water during wet operation. Slush, Gravel, Loose soild will require a higher depth tread pattern and like a button (like motocross bike tyres).Roughly the more looser the soil the more the distance between two studs/buttons. A Dual purpose tyre will have closely packed buttons because they have to perform good on tar road as well as little off-roading and so contact patch needs to be good for more grip. A motocross type tyre will have very less contact patch and so will perform poorly on tarmac but the studs will grip the loose soil (sort of a positive contact) better and so good grip in off-road conditions.

2) Tubeless or tubetype
If you are having alloys in your bike then one should go for tubeless tyres. Tubeless tyres have one advantage that in case of punctures they dont leak air abruptly (also called as "burp" -lingo) and will deflate slowly. This is a serious advantage considering the fatalities that can occur if you loose your balance due to sudden loss of air. Incase of puncture tube type air leak air very abruptly because a major quantity of air comes out between the tyre and the rim. This doesnot happen with tubeless tyres as they have a strong air tight seal between the rim and the tyre beads. Also you save on the extra cost of a tube required for a tubetype tyre.
The only disadvantage with a tubeless tyre that I can think of is that its difficult to repair a tubeless tyre puncture with sidewall punctures. Also if you bent alloys/rims its difficult for a tubeless tyre to maintain a airtight seal with the rim at the beads. And thats why one should never use a tube type tyre (TT) as tubeless because a tube type tyre will leak air very abruptly between the rim and the tyre beads with the slightest deformation of the rims. A tubeless (TL) tyre has a special structure for better sealing at the beads where it contacts the rim and therefore better ability to seal slight deformations of the rim. TL also has its inner lining coated with butyl rubber which is more impermeable to air and it also forms a good seal with the puncturing nail and so air leaks slowly. Its also advised not to scratch the inner lining of TL tyres so that the tyres are able to maintain the tyre pressure for a longer period. TL tyres cannot be used with rims having spokes because air can leak at the spoke joints. But some internet search and few people have coated the inner linging of spoked wheels to form a airtight joint. But again spoked wheel deforms a lot and the airtight seal might not last long and also especially when the spoked wheel deforms during crossing a pothole at high speed.A Tubeless tyre is marked "Tubeless" on the tyre or "TL" at least in the specifications provided by manufacturer. Dont make the mistake of fitting a TT tyre as TL.
In heavy off-roading alloys are not used as they can crack and are not so much flexible as a spoke rim so if one is into heavy off-roading one should go for tubetype tyre to avoid the "burp".

3) While changing tyres we just forget this check. Its necessary because a Load rating of the tyre means the capacity of the load it can carry. One should always opt for a higher load rating or at least the same, holds true for those who travel with load or a pillion.

4) Rim size:
It is important that we match the rim size with the tyre size. If we use a fatter tyre on a thin rim having less width, the tyre bulges out and makes a rounder profile at the contact patch thus practically reducing the contact patch inspite of we going for a fatter tyre. The more rounder profile creates two problems, we have comparitive more wear at the centre of the tyre and also the beads at the rim are in considerable tension which might lead to premature failure or the "burp". But this tyre might be good for cornering.
A short research on google and with my own little logic I comeout with this:

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorb...ml#post2844214 (Bikers Beware: Tube Type, Tubeless and Tire conundrum!)

So guys if you want a broader contact patch just fitting a fatter tyre would not give you a bigger contact patch, you might be required to change the rim to one with a bigger rim width say 2.15j (Apache rear rim) to 2.5j (Pulsar rear rim).Also a more rounded profile of a tyre than your stock tyre means it has a bigger rolling radius and so it will mess up with your speedometer and also your bike will be raised a bit.


5) Clearance between Swing arm and the tyre. Extent of Modifications required to fit in your favourite fatter tyre.
This clearance is very important as the tyre can rub your swingarm or your bikes body parts especially during the bike going through a pothole. And what if the tyre punctures and there is no space for the flattened tyre. I am still to find out the acceptable gap between the swing arm and the tyre but I feel a minimum of 7-8 mm will be required for all the conditions the tyre has to go through.(The tyre expands width wise while going through a pothole). You can adjust a fatter tyre in your existing bike by pulling the rear tyre more rearwards by adjusting the chain. You might be required to fit an additional link in the chain to do so. You will also might be required to cut the chain guard to make clearance. I would never recommend cutting the swing arm to make space for fatter tyre as it will lead to serious problems with the rigidity-read stability of the bike and also the reliability of the bike.

6) Compound of tyre (Soft/Hard) used in manufacturing the tyre.
Compound of the tyre is one of the most important even more important than contact patch. A softer tyre compound has better grip than a similar hard compound tyres. But a softer compound tyre will wear faster leading to less life of the tyre. A harder compound tyre has less onroad grip but will last longer. On pure loose soil as in off-roading the compound of the tyre will not matter much but the tread depth and tread pattern will matter more.(Read button type). A Dual purpose tyre will have a right blend of the Soft and Hard Compound, Hard enough so that it lasts long during the off-roading and at the same type soft enough to get a good grip on tarmac which is quite difficult to get.

7) Cross-section Profile of tyre - Round/Flat.
Tyre which are found on race bikes will have a more rounder profile which is good for cornering at high-speeds. Tyres which are found on touring bikes will have more of a flat profile to get better contact patch while straight-ahead driving position. One more point to be noted here is that a thinner rim width will make a tyre more rounder and a higher rim width will make the tyre more flat so one might need to select the correct rim width size to get the correct tyre profile he desires. The tyre profile depends on the tyre make the tyre manufacturer can make a tyre which is mounted on thinner rim to have a flat profile where as a tyre which is mounted on wider rim to have a rounder profile so it all depends on the type of tyre. One should always check whether a certain tyre width can be mounted on a particular rim width from the manufacturer itself.

8) Width of tyre/Wider contact patch.
We always want a wider contact patch at the contact between the tyre and road contact point. Now one would question that Mu Friction coefficient is not dependent on area but then that is only true of ideal

bodies which dont deform.For those bodies which deform like the tyre rubber the above law doesnot hold true and the law of micro asperities rules the situation. So the more wider the tyre the more grip it will

give. But remember a wider/heavier tyre and more so with a soft compound due to more grip is bound to reduce your bikes acceleration and also to some extent fuel efficiency.

For 17 inch rim size rear tyre (from various owners experiences) :

Zapper C (TL) 100/110/120 /80 X 17: A typical hard compound tyre but with a good blend so decent grip in wet braking and dry grip on tarmac. Average in all conditions so a good all-rounder. A pulsar 120/80 x

17 tyre is having a medium compound while the other sizes of Zapper C are hard compound tyres. Lasts nearly 20000 plus kms.

Zapper Vyde (TL) 120/80 X 17: A good tyre for wet grip and phenomenol dry grip. Its a soft compound tyre and so prone to punctures and has less life of around 15k kms.

Ceat Vertigo Sport (TL) (Button type tyre but closely spaced buttons) 100/120 /80 X 17: Excellent tyre for off-roading/slush/gravel and with Ok grip in Wet conditions on tarmac. Riding at high speeds and high

speed cornering can be a concern. Not a track tyre obviously neither for corner cravers. Wet grip on tarmac is less than Zapper C but good on slush/gravel etc. Its a Indian dual sport tyre sort of.

TVS tyres (TL): All TVS tyres are made up of extremely hard compound tyres and so offer bad grip in wet conditions. In dry conditions for a average joe it will be just ok but a wet patch is enough to loose its

line. I would not recommend these tyres to anyone. Only advantage is they are very hard to puncture and have a long life.I had used them in my Ladakh trip (as stock tyre on my RTR180 spec 110/80 x 17)

without any punctures or air-pressure loss but were horrible in wet conditions.Long life of the tyre but at what cost?Seriously not recommended. Life nearly 35k kms with zero grip.

Michelin Pilot sporty (Tubetype TT) 100/80 x 17: Soft compound tyre with excellent grip on dry aswell as wet tarmac but looses its line on gravel. Lasts 15k kms.


MRF Rear tyre for R15 version 1 (100/80 x 17): Soft compound tyre very good grip in wet and dry tarmac conditions. Not so good for gravel and off-roading. Lasts 15k kms.

Other Imported International Soft compound tyres: IRC NR48 and Pirelli MT75 (110/80 X 17) Have good dry as well as wet grip.Good for On-road grip. Life around 15k kms.

Other Imported Dual sport tyres from Vee Rubber and Duro: Heard good reports about them but cannot comment on its availability and particular tyre model.

From the above its clear that we really dont have a single tyre which is good enough for on-road (dry/wet) condition and for light off-roading. Michellin Sirac and M45 both which were imported are good dual

purpose tyres but now very difficult to find and I think are tube type ones and not available for 17 inch rim size.

Michelin Sirac street is made in India but are hard compound tyres and not so grippy as Michelin Sirac Imported.

Dunlop tyres have mixed response from people.Some find it OK and some find it not so good. Dunlop Geo-Cruiser wears out unevenly from middle and later hampers grip.

I hope other people add more to this list.

Mods: Please delete this post if it infringes or does not makes sense here.
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Old 27th July 2012, 12:44   #50
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Default Re: My learnings:

Quote:
Originally Posted by amit_purohit20 View Post
...I am just penning it down here so that for people who are new to tyres can get consolidated information in this post and need not go through the trouble of reading a lot of material on internet.
Awesome compilation and very useful to have all info in one post rather than random internet searches. Hats off to you for taking time to pen this down.

Just to add, a disadvantage of TL tyres is if the puncture is big, you either have to convert the tyre to tube type or discard the tyre for a new one. The same happened to my stock RTR180 tyre. A blade pierced the tyre and the puncture was about an inch and half wide. It could not be sealed completely and it was continuously leaking air. I ended up buying the Pirelli MT75 which has proved to be good so far for nearly 7.5k kms.
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Old 27th July 2012, 21:16   #51
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

Two points which I noticed
1)For soft compound/medium compound tyres, if you press your finger nail it will go deeper inside and it takes some time before the cavity thus created to get filled. Do the same thing for a hard compound tyre and there will be hardly any indentation in the tyre and even if it happens it regains back very fast.
2) Hard compound tyres had smooth surface finish, where as the medium compound had rough surface finish. I mean if we rub the soft/medium compound tyres like Michelin Pilot Sporty and also Zapper C (120/80x17) some micro layers of rubber will come out like how it comes when you erase a thing on the paper with rubber (Just the feel).
I really dont know whether the above two points can be taken as a test for distinguishing between Soft and hard compound tyres but its just my observation.
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Old 30th July 2012, 21:27   #52
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Default Changing tyres on my TBTS

As you probably know: the Thunderbird twinspark (350cc) has 19' tyres, which is also the size of the front tyre of the Classic 500 (domestic).

I want to replace the ribbed front tyre of my TBTS with that of the Classic 500, which has a better tread pattern. But the TBTS front tyre is 3.25' x 19' while the Classic 500 front tyre 90/90 -19'. Are the tyres interchangeable? That is, can I exchange them without changing the rim (or something?). I don't want the tyre to come off when I am riding the bike!

Will be grateful for any informed input.

Thanks!

PS: I'm thinking of trying this because I want a good 19' front tyre, which won't skid even during (mild) off-roading. I was told the Ceat Secura Sport 19' is the best, but couldn't locate one even after months of trying

Last edited by Rollin' Thunda : 30th July 2012 at 21:50.
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Old 30th July 2012, 21:47   #53
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Default Re: Changing tyres on my TBTS

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Originally Posted by Rollin' Thunda View Post
As you probably know: the Thunderbird twinspark (350cc) has 19' tyres, which is also the size of the front tyre of the Classic 500 (domestic).

I want to replace the ribbed front tyre of my TBTS with that of the Classic 500, which has a better tread pattern. But the TBTS front tyre is 3.25' x 19' while the Classic 500 front tyre 90/90 -19'. Are the tyres interchangeable? That is, can I exchange them without changing the rim (or something?). I don't want the tyre to come off when I am riding the bike!

Will be grateful for any informed input.

Thanks!
Yup, they're nearly the same size. Can definitely be used with the old rim.
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Old 31st July 2012, 11:50   #54
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

Quote:
Originally Posted by amit_purohit20 View Post
Two points which I noticed
1)For soft compound/medium compound tyres, if you press your finger nail it will go deeper inside and it takes some time before the cavity thus created to get filled. Do the same thing for a hard compound tyre and there will be hardly any indentation in the tyre and even if it happens it regains back very fast.
2) Hard compound tyres had smooth surface finish, where as the medium compound had rough surface finish. I mean if we rub the soft/medium compound tyres like Michelin Pilot Sporty and also Zapper C (120/80x17) some micro layers of rubber will come out like how it comes when you erase a thing on the paper with rubber (Just the feel).
I really dont know whether the above two points can be taken as a test for distinguishing between Soft and hard compound tyres but its just my observation.

Yes, your obervation is spot on. When you press a soft compound tyre like zapper vyde,Pirelli MT75 you will get a sinking feeling with your nail . And the depression will take some time to get back. I tried the same with a 100/90- 17 zapper C and it was noticably hard to press!Contrary to most people's belief i found Pirelli sport demon to be pretty hard compound! MT75 is a true soft compound tire.

One more observation is softcompound tires take less time to warm up compared to harder ones.And once sufficiently warmed up it is pretty difficult to lock up the tire ! Case in point is the MRF zapper FY(R15 V1) tire.This thing is a beauty ! No once has it locked up however hard i have braked. This is in comparison with the zapper FS which has squealed and locked up under similar conditions ! I re-iterate, the R15 front tire is the best in business available easily in Indian market. Instead of searching for some expensive imported tires , the R15 front 80/90-17 (V1) and 90/80-17(V2) are Best in class

I would anyday put money on soft compound tires. For me its more than enough if the tire lasts me 15K kms. Grip and my life is more important than tire life!

Last edited by sagarpadaki : 31st July 2012 at 11:59.
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Old 31st July 2012, 16:35   #55
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

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I re-iterate, the R15 front tire is the best in business available easily in Indian market. Instead of searching for some expensive imported tires , the R15 front 80/90-17 (V1) and 90/80-17(V2) are Best in class

I would anyday put money on soft compound tires. For me its more than enough if the tire lasts me 15K kms. Grip and my life is more important than tire life!
Sagar,
Can you please give me the nomencalture of Yamaha R15's front and rear tyre?
Front is MRF ZAPPER FY 80/90-17 for (V1) and MRF ZAPPER FY 90/80-17 for (V2)
Rear tyre is MRF ZAPPER S 100/90 x 17 for (V1)
I am confused between "FY" "FS" and "S"
Also are these tyres readily available? I think they are tubeless and also what is the approximate cost for front and rear tyre? I am looking out for rear tyres for my RTR 180 and the max tyre width I want to fit is the stock width 110 so I want a tyre 110/80 x 17 for which I know of only 1 alternative that is the Honda Dazzlers rear tyre with same spec and make is MRF.
I am ready to go one size down if I can get the Yamaha R15's rear tyre in market. I know MRF Vyde in 120 section is a good tyre but I dont want to go for it because RTR 180 has thin rims (2.15 j) which make the tyre protrude out and have a rounder profile with less contact patch.
Please help. Thanks,
Amit
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Old 31st July 2012, 17:10   #56
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

Quote:
Originally Posted by amit_purohit20 View Post
Sagar,
Can you please give me the nomencalture of Yamaha R15's front and rear tyre?
Front is MRF ZAPPER FY 80/90-17 for (V1) and MRF ZAPPER FY 90/80-17 for (V2)
Rear tyre is MRF ZAPPER S 100/90 x 17 for (V1)
I am confused between "FY" "FS" and "S"
Also are these tyres readily available? I think they are tubeless and also what is the approximate cost for front and rear tyre? I am looking out for rear tyres for my RTR 180 and the max tyre width I want to fit is the stock width 110 so I want a tyre 110/80 x 17 for which I know of only 1 alternative that is the Honda Dazzlers rear tyre with same spec and make is MRF.
I am ready to go one size down if I can get the Yamaha R15's rear tyre in market. I know MRF Vyde in 120 section is a good tyre but I dont want to go for it because RTR 180 has thin rims (2.15 j) which make the tyre protrude out and have a rounder profile with less contact patch.
Please help. Thanks,
Amit

In this case you can go for R15 V1 rear tyre- Zapper S 100/80-17 costs approx 2500 bucks at MRF dealers.Available across the counter at all Yamaha show rooms!
There is another option of Michelin pilot sporty tubeless 110/80-17 costing around 2500.


For front go with eyes closed for R15 V2 front tyre which is 90/80-17- Exact name is MRF Nylogrip Zapper FY1 90/80-R17

Dont know about the cost!This i am not sure you will get at MRF dealers. You can give a try.But will be available at Yamaha showrooms.If not you can place the order for them at multiple showrooms and hope you get at one of them

I assure you you will just love the leech grip of the front tyre like anything.
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Old 31st July 2012, 19:13   #57
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

Excellent thread!

Would appreciate if anybody could throw in options for 150/60-17 section tires (for the Duke of course)

Thanks in advance.
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Old 31st July 2012, 20:46   #58
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Originally Posted by Shubz
Excellent thread!

Would appreciate if anybody could throw in options for 150/60-17 section tires (for the Duke of course)

Thanks in advance.
Unfortunately , there are very less after market options in that size. Difficult to find them . You can get in touch with millivisions in Bangalore for options in that size. He stocks them or can get them for you.

How do you find the tyres on duke?
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Old 31st July 2012, 21:21   #59
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Default Re: Motorcycle Tyres : Compared!

Sagar the Michelin Pilot Sporty 110/80 x 17 is very difficult to find. And as per the Michelin site I think they dont sell any tubeless tyres in India. The section 110 could be a imported one from thailand and I dont want to make the mistake of using a Tubetype tyre as Tubeless. Thanks for the other information, I need to check the Yamaha showrooms for the rear tyre of V1. I plan to take the bike with a pillion to Leh next year. How would the V1 tyre fare in mild off-road? Is it prone to punctures?
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Old 31st July 2012, 22:45   #60
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Originally Posted by amit_purohit20
Sagar the Michelin Pilot Sporty 110/80 x 17 is very difficult to find. And as per the Michelin site I think they dont sell any tubeless tyres in India. The section 110 could be a imported one from thailand and I dont want to make the mistake of using a Tubetype tyre as Tubeless. Thanks for the other information, I need to check the Yamaha showrooms for the rear tyre of V1. I plan to take the bike with a pillion to Leh next year. How would the V1 tyre fare in mild off-road? Is it prone to punctures?
Ya the one I used was made in Thailand. Probably grey market imports!! Then your best bet would be r 15 v1 rear tyre.

But I would not recommend doing leh with that tyre. If you are goin there,best would be a ceat vertigo sport 100/90 17. Its a tough tire which can withstand the rough terrain and also grips in the mud and slush
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