Go Back   Team-BHP > BHP India > Motorbikes


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 6th December 2013, 16:43   #61
BHPian
 
motionfreak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Thane
Posts: 184
Thanked: 54 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

dude buy a 2006-07 made carb zma for 30-40K/-. change plug, air filter, chain-sprocket , clutch-throttle cables and clutch plates (if needed).
put on Semi off road tyres, eg Michelin Sirac Street, and 55/60W headlight bulb.
start riding.
have test ridden it yet?

Last edited by motionfreak : 6th December 2013 at 16:52.
motionfreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th December 2013, 00:29   #62
BHPian
 
ashkamath's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Vasco-Goa
Posts: 345
Thanked: 310 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Kabooom, an interesting thread indeed and let me jump in the bandwagon.

I am 5'7" (a measly 1" taller to you) and lean built and own a 390, done over 3000 Kms and I can straight away tell you, this is not the bike you would want to ride to Himalayas.

1. The Bike suspension is hard (though adjustable it is still HARD)
2. Seat is a piece of granite
3. This bike feels happy upwards of 5000 RPM ( you will be doing 100 Kmph at 5500 RPM), below this rpm the bike sends too much vibes to your palms and feet. The bike does not like to ridden at lower gears though it is possible.
4. In the Duke 390 threads I have repeatedly mentioned about the fatigue factor that I and also couple of 390 riders encountered. I have owned and ridden pulsar / kawa Elim, ridden long distances, but this bike fatigues you fast. 200 Kms ride on this bike and one is quite tired ( let us not go into the reasons for that. some Duke 390 thread sheds more light on it)
5. Fuel tank is 10.5 ltrs. The range is 200-225 Kms till the tank dries up (at the mountains you will be doing lower gears at higher RPMs with semi clutch / full clutch more often than not and that drinks up fuel faster)- Normal Mileage is around 27 Kmpl, and Himalayan ride will give you much lesser. A reason to concern.
6. The bike is still tall. at 5'6" both you have to extend your toes to the max to touch the terra ferma.
7. The bike does not come with a main stand. If you have a puncture or any other incident you will have tough time. ( you can carry a paddock stand if it helps)
8. I have the issue of chain slackening at 400-500 Kms ( some riders have said their chains slacken every 300 Kms). and the company bike manual advises chain lubing every 500 Kms (essentially involves chain tightening). Coz in my case after 450-500 Kms the slack chain makes itself evident That is a bother. you could do it yourself but again the paddock stand and stuffs come in picture.
9. The bike doesn't come with a kicker ( only battery, for any reason if battery fails then it is a bother)
10. The Exhaust opening / silencer is at the bottom most part of the bike and if you were to wade into streams, the exhaust would submerge first. ( nothing adverse but compared to other bikes I just mention this as I dont like it that way)
11. I am not sure if 390 could be as easily repaired like the bulls or Yamaha's if there is a breakdown ( I reckon there should not be any problem )
12. For my height (read your height) riding position is NOT very comfortable. I have been trying to find a optimum / comfortable riding position and still trying..

As there were so many recommendations for 390 ( I presume mainly for the sheer acceleration / power delivery) you may feel that I have put across too many negatives to you.

This bike is good if you cruise the GQ road with a pleasant 100-110 Kmph speed or take the twisties / ghats at 60-70. But Himalaya is a total different ball game. this is not about speed. this is more about endurance, how much you know your bike, how you can cope with the unexpected thrown at you at every corner.

I would suggest your present R135 for the ride because.

1. It is your trusted ride for over 14 years now. ( even though you don't ride it much). you know this bike more than any other bike around. trusted old mate
2. You said your tank is gone. get a slightly larger capacity tank fabricated if you plan to take your trusted R135 for the Himalayas.
3. It's height and weight are comfortable for you ( I have seen Kinetic Honda scaling Himalayas, so R135 power should do)
4. you said you have a budget of 2 Lac. Spend a fraction on your present bike. Get knobby / mountain tyres, go to the mechanic spend some time, learn how to change the clutch / brake cables/ changing bulbs / cleaning spark plug, how to use to puncture kit . Infact take your bike as a DIY restoration project. take the help of a mechanic, take her apart, assemble her step by step, replace worn out parts. make it an interesting project. It will leave you far satisfied and more in love with your R135 and all this for a fraction of your budget.

Once back from Himalayas, if you are still keen then KTM RC390 faired bike ( the faired version of 390, even the more powerful 690, and a host of bikes are there for you to choose and pick.

my point is let not the Himalaya ride be a barometer for you to make an investment of 2 lakh and buy a bike with that one particular ride in mind.

But should you still choose to buy one of those that you listed, TB, RTR, 390 and all, check out each bike, ride it, feel it and see which bike you connect most from your heart and go for it. rest are all academic discussions. Finally make a decision with both heart and mind and only your decision should matter. as the hindi saying goes Sunn sab ki kar mann Ki. After all it is your Himalayan Raid

Check this link: http://www.beontheroad.com/2009/11/m...-of-world.html where the narration says -
"the thing that was cool about this motorcycling outfit is that we had all kinds of motorcycles in our stable, starting from Hero Honda (100cc) to TVS Fiero (150 cc) to Bajaj Pulsar (150 and 180 cc) to Yezdi Road King (275 cc) to Yamaha RX 135 (135 cc) to the Royal Enfield Bullets (350 and 500 cc). The only thing that ran strong in the entire group was the love and passion for motorcycling and feeling the wind on our faces"

There you go. Take due diligence, prepare well, and then Bike really does not matter, but you do !!

Last edited by ashkamath : 7th December 2013 at 00:41.
ashkamath is offline   (8) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 7th December 2013, 12:44   #63
Senior - BHPian
 
ebonho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Pune
Posts: 3,942
Thanked: 3,178 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashkamath View Post
10. The Exhaust opening / silencer is at the bottom most part of the bike and if you were to wade into streams, the exhaust would submerge first. ( nothing adverse but compared to other bikes I just mention this as I dont like it that way)
Great post Ashok - very well thought of points against the 390 for the mountains. However, the one above is not one of them. I am sure you have seen the popular video of the Duke exhaust puttering around completely under water, changing gears even, chopping throttle, no slipping of clutch, and then the piece de resistance - stopping the bike under water, then restarting it under water, and riding away! Rejoice - you are riding a submarine on wheels!!
ebonho is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 7th December 2013, 14:11   #64
Newbie
 
satnjyoti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 23
Thanked: 11 Times
Default

Kudos ashkamat. Great write up. Away from the usual rants of an owner as to how amazing his ride is, your post is a very valid and genuine assessment of KTM. Points brought out by you are very relevant and derive their legitimacy from the fact that you're an owner of the vehicle which you are recommending against. True to the spirit of this forum and a true 'tester' like. Keep it up buddy.
satnjyoti is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 9th December 2013, 23:49   #65
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 137
Thanked: 16 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaboooooom View Post

Er... By Premium I meant, something more than regular commuters. Perhaps better suited for power/performance/comfort and not that much concerned about fuel economy, low price. Definitely not talking about 5-10+ Lakh range. One day, I hope to get a Hypermotard ... Been on my mind since I saw Yes Man. But that 'one day' is kinda eluding me for now


May I request the experienced users to write down a little bit of your experiences with these bikes regarding your trip and the good/bad about the bike. I dont want the bike to fail me while I come across that unseen curving road or that interesting looking ascent. A few months back in Nainital, while at a hotel balcony, I saw these 2 guys, climbing up the rising street (towards me) and their bike was sort of struggling. I don't remember the model but it had fatter tyres (than regular commuters) and looked powerful but it just managed the climb barely. It might have been an Apache. I am not sure though. I don't want that to happen. I am looking for that feeling which an Alto Vxi gives you when you see something unfamiliar compared to a Honda City. With a Honda City, you are almost afraid, with an Alto Vxi, you are Curious. Something on those lines ...
Kaboooom, you are looking for a bike that doesn't exist in the Indian market just yet. Horses for courses and in this case what you are looking for falls into the Adventure tourer category. Let us take the example of the Honda CRF230L although decades old still gets great reviews. The CRF230L employs the very same engine as our very own ZMA. The Zma's engine has trailie roots but sold in a chassis with sporting pretensions, no wonder it doesn't feel like a sport bike because it isn't one. But in rough road conditions it shines - not in the way you might think where you are riding roughshod, but in the way it allows you to use the GB, clutch, brakes and low end torque of the engine to negotiate the rough stuff. It never feels like you are hustling this thing, more like gently and expertly picking your way through an obstacle course. Seriously, this bike is unfazed by the rough stuff.

No sir, the handling doesnt feel sports-bike secure at triple digits as the front has a tendency to bob and move around robbing the rider of feel and confidence. However, triple digits on straights and sweepers are a breeze but do not expect long stints >120. It has one of the most effective windshields in the business let me tell you. The full chain cover ensures that the chain stays clean for what feels like forever, all you need to do is spray chain-lube every 1000 kms or so, the chain cover also prolongs chain life.

After all these years it doesnt look glamorous any more, matter of fact I found the looks rather stodgy initially. But they have grown on me and I now see it as one for the ages. You will see that Zma owners who have moved on always speak fondly of their steeds. Although I have a Duke 390, I am not letting go of my Zma any time soon.

As to the negatives, the front brakes are good but not intuitive. Because of the soft ride, the front shocks have a tendency to dive and you will not feel real resistance until final 20% of suspension travel or so, miraculously it has never bottomed out for me even under hard braking. It takes a while to gain some confidence, but i dont see braking as an issue with the Zma. Secondly, the factory tires are par for the course on a standard commuter, if you are a sane rider like me, they will get the job done. However, consider an upgrade that can handle the rough stuff better.

The oil seal on the front suspension occasionally pops but replacement is quite cheap. The huge plastic fairing rattles when you hit a pothole but I never felt that it was in danger of falling off. The plastic is poor and has a tendency to develop small cracks. In my book, all these niggles are a small price to pay for a well-rounded package. Also note that it isnt particularly fast off the blocks in the same way an RTR or an FZ is, the way the Zma delivers its power is very different. The Zma's power delivery feels optimized for handling the rough stuff.

Now consider this, a 2011 Zma with low kms like < 20k can be had for 50K rupees. My bike is at 13.5k kms and it is beginning to feel like it is freeing up, it feels like it has plenty of life in it. I personally think it makes a great project bike but the basic ingredients are already there.
Beast_of_Burden is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2013, 00:37   #66
BHPian
 
giri1.8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Chennai
Posts: 402
Thanked: 230 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

My guess is that autoexpo will have something which might interest you! and there are speculations that Impulse will be re-introduced with a bigger engine(might be ZMA's 223cc). If you not in a hurry you can wait for few months before making your decision.
giri1.8 is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2013, 22:38   #67
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 137
Thanked: 16 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by giri1.8 View Post
My guess is that autoexpo will have something which might interest you! and there are speculations that Impulse will be re-introduced with a bigger engine(might be ZMA's 223cc). If you not in a hurry you can wait for few months before making your decision.
If the Impulse is coming back I fervently hope Hero brings it back with the Zma's 223cc mill. The 2014 Zma looks terrible, hopefully the Impulse carries on where the Zma left off.
Beast_of_Burden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2013, 23:30   #68
BHPian
 
VedderTheFixer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 70
Thanked: 31 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashkamath View Post
Kabooom, an interesting thread indeed and let me jump in the bandwagon.

I am 5'7" (a measly 1" taller to you) and lean built and own a 390, done over 3000 Kms and I can straight away tell you, this is not the bike you would want to ride to Himalayas.

1. The Bike suspension is hard (though adjustable it is still HARD)
2. Seat is a piece of granite
3. This bike feels happy upwards of 5000 RPM ( you will be doing 100 Kmph at 5500 RPM), below this rpm the bike sends too much vibes to your palms and feet. The bike does not like to ridden at lower gears though it is possible.
4. In the Duke 390 threads I have repeatedly mentioned about the fatigue factor that I and also couple of 390 riders encountered. I have owned and ridden pulsar / kawa Elim, ridden long distances, but this bike fatigues you fast. 200 Kms ride on this bike and one is quite tired ( let us not go into the reasons for that. some Duke 390 thread sheds more light on it)
5. Fuel tank is 10.5 ltrs. The range is 200-225 Kms till the tank dries up (at the mountains you will be doing lower gears at higher RPMs with semi clutch / full clutch more often than not and that drinks up fuel faster)- Normal Mileage is around 27 Kmpl, and Himalayan ride will give you much lesser. A reason to concern.
6. The bike is still tall. at 5'6" both you have to extend your toes to the max to touch the terra ferma.
7. The bike does not come with a main stand. If you have a puncture or any other incident you will have tough time. ( you can carry a paddock stand if it helps)
8. I have the issue of chain slackening at 400-500 Kms ( some riders have said their chains slacken every 300 Kms). and the company bike manual advises chain lubing every 500 Kms (essentially involves chain tightening). Coz in my case after 450-500 Kms the slack chain makes itself evident That is a bother. you could do it yourself but again the paddock stand and stuffs come in picture.
9. The bike doesn't come with a kicker ( only battery, for any reason if battery fails then it is a bother)
10. The Exhaust opening / silencer is at the bottom most part of the bike and if you were to wade into streams, the exhaust would submerge first. ( nothing adverse but compared to other bikes I just mention this as I dont like it that way)
11. I am not sure if 390 could be as easily repaired like the bulls or Yamaha's if there is a breakdown ( I reckon there should not be any problem )
12. For my height (read your height) riding position is NOT very comfortable. I have been trying to find a optimum / comfortable riding position and still trying..

As there were so many recommendations for 390 ( I presume mainly for the sheer acceleration / power delivery) you may feel that I have put across too many negatives to you.

This bike is good if you cruise the GQ road with a pleasant 100-110 Kmph speed or take the twisties / ghats at 60-70. But Himalaya is a total different ball game. this is not about speed. this is more about endurance, how much you know your bike, how you can cope with the unexpected thrown at you at every corner.
Thank you , this post has been very informative. I just got back from a meet with a few friends ; we are planning a ride to Leh in June. I will most likely buy the Duke 390 in January and the intention specifically was the ride .

I think i can make do with the seat & suspension comfort, should be manageable. But as an owner, can you please tell me if the overheating reports are as bad as they have been reported to be? Consider Rohtang for instance, low gears, high revs, clutch in use etc etc..wont this be asking for overheating trouble?

It's this one point thats in the back of my mind, disturbs me actually.

Any light you could shed on this would be most appreciated. Thanks again & happy riding!!!

Last edited by Aditya : 16th December 2013 at 11:35.
VedderTheFixer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th December 2013, 19:49   #69
BHPian
 
ashkamath's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Vasco-Goa
Posts: 345
Thanked: 310 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by VedderTheFixer View Post
I just got back from a meet with a few friends ; we are planning a ride to Leh in June. I will most likely buy the Duke 390 in January and the intention specifically was the ride .

But as an owner, can you please tell me if the overheating reports are as bad as they have been reported to be? Consider Rohtang for instance, low gears, high revs, clutch in use etc etc..wont this be asking for overheating trouble?

It's this one point thats in the back of my mind, disturbs me actually.

Any light you could shed on this would be most appreciated. Thanks again & happy riding!!!
Hey Vedder, Let us face it. Any high performance bike with liquid cooled engine heats up. This is the price to be paid for performance. Then engine heating does not mean overheating trouble ( like you have mentioned). So this is a hot engine NOT AN overheated engine. You say it overheated when you see all the bars in the temperature display light up and the warning light lights up with a display message that there is a problem with High coolant temperature. So till such time it is just a Hot engine. In fact you may note that there are 13 bars in the temperature display and if it lights up to 10 bars even then engine is still WARM and not hot.

Now, the real problem actually isnít the engine heat but the fact that it is liquid cooled and involves a radiator fan in the front and when that comes on (The radiator fan switches on at 96 Deg C and switches off at 90 Deg C) i.e. when the temp increased beyond 96 Deg C, all the hot air extracted through the radiator fins is directed to your legs. This is the hot air flow design issue and not engine per-se. In some high powered faired bikes, a hot air exhaust duct is provided under the engine so that the rider does not feel the heat.

Consider Rohtang for instance, low gears, high revs, clutch in use etc etc. your engine heats up naturally ( every bike's engine does, be it a bull or a pulsar or a ZMA). but that does not mean an Engine Over heating. That will happen only if there is a issue with the coolant. Further your attire for a high altitude, cold condition ride would definitely involve a water proof thermal wear, Warm clothes ( some time in layers). So essentially your body is packed to withstand the high altitude cold and if your radiator fan blows a little hot air you should be actually welcoming it. Okie. while riding in the city at low gear under hot / humid conditions you will resent it or even may loathe it, but in cold conditions it could be a welcome source of heat

Bottom line is - It is the hot air from the radiator fins that is causing the mischief and your engine is just fine and healthy. Then about the ride up the mountain- low gears- high revs, clutch engaged and all. this is were the bike's torque comes into picture. Let us see the TB 500 specs. Bullet website says 27.2 BHP @ 5250 RPM and Max Torque generated is 41.3 NM @ 4000 RPM whereas for a Duke 390 it is 44 BHP @ 9500 RPM and Max torque is 35NM @ 7250 RPM. So a Thunder Bird essentially generates a higher torque at a lesser RPM than a Duke 390 which translates to a TB engine is much happier than a Duke engine at a leh like ride conditions where you are at low gears, high revs.. this is so because at 7500 RPM where a Duke 390 generates max torque you will be cruising over 100+ Kms which again is not what we want for this type of ride.

But after all Duke 390 is a Motorcycle built to ride (and it is a fantastic bike by any standards) and Rohtang - leh is another road where you intend to ride your stead, just go ahead and do it. People have ridden from KInetic Honda, CD 100, Pulsars, Bulls to SBK's and what not.. to Leh. So now that you have decided to ride a Duke 390 to Leh, Plan well and just ride. Don't get too much bugged with a few niggling issues afterall no bike is perfect like no human is perfect
ashkamath is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2013, 11:50   #70
Senior - BHPian
 
ebonho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Pune
Posts: 3,942
Thanked: 3,178 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashkamath View Post
Bottom line is - It is the hot air from the radiator fins that is causing the mischief and your engine is just fine and healthy. Then about the ride up the mountain- low gears- high revs, clutch engaged and all. this is were the bike's torque comes into picture. Let us see the TB 500 specs. Bullet website says 27.2 BHP @ 5250 RPM and Max Torque generated is 41.3 NM @ 4000 RPM whereas for a Duke 390 it is 44 BHP @ 9500 RPM and Max torque is 35NM @ 7250 RPM. So a Thunder Bird essentially generates a higher torque at a lesser RPM than a Duke 390 which translates to a TB engine is much happier than a Duke engine at a leh like ride conditions where you are at low gears, high revs.. this is so because at 7500 RPM where a Duke 390 generates max torque you will be cruising over 100+ Kms which again is not what we want for this type of ride.
Good points on the LC heating issue Ashok.

On the "on paper" torque specs, let us remember a few things.

These are test bed specs at crank. What happens at the rear wheel, which is what really counts for us riders, especially when climbing, and that too at altitude, is a different ball game.

Purely Duke to Bull, since these are the bikes you have compared, here the transmission comes into the equation. How good is it at transferring all that on paper at crank torque to the rear wheel.

No. 2, is the fact that we are not talking about the bikes performing at sea level, but at 4 to 5.5 kms up in the sky. How the respective engines breathe and how their fueling adapts are critical for how the torque is dveloped, and more importantly, how much of that on paper at crank torque is developed.

No. 3, and finally the most important factor, is the weights of these two bikes. On a plain road, in Pune (about 0.5 kms up above sea level), I have seen a Bullet, with 3 guys sitting on it, pull a stallled Maruti Zen (with two guys sitting it it), from stand still!

But that equation is very different to what happens at altitude, and when the gradient is steeply upward. Here weight sucks a huge amount of that torque which the bike finally manages to generate at 4-5.5 kms above sea level, and which it actually manages to transmit to the rear wheel, after transmission losses.

On the one hand you have a 200 kg bike, on the other you have a 150 kg bike.

Its the equivalent of the Bullet having to pull upwards with an extra 50 kg pillion, over the Duke being ridden solo.
ebonho is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2013, 15:54   #71
BHPian
 
ashkamath's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Vasco-Goa
Posts: 345
Thanked: 310 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
Purely Duke to Bull, since these are the bikes you have compared, here the transmission comes into the equation. How good is it at transferring all that on paper at crank torque to the rear wheel.

No. 2, is the fact that we are not talking about the bikes performing at sea level, but at 4 to 5.5 kms up in the sky. How the respective engines breathe and how their fueling adapts are critical for how the torque is dveloped, and more importantly, how much of that on paper at crank torque is developed.

No. 3, and finally the most important factor, is the weights of these two bikes. On a plain road, in Pune (about 0.5 kms up above sea level), I have seen a Bullet, with 3 guys sitting on it, pull a stallled Maruti Zen (with two guys sitting it it), from stand still!

But that equation is very different to what happens at altitude, and when the gradient is steeply upward. Here weight sucks a huge amount of that torque which the bike finally manages to generate at 4-5.5 kms above sea level, and which it actually manages to transmit to the rear wheel, after transmission losses.

On the one hand you have a 200 kg bike, on the other you have a 150 kg bike.

Its the equivalent of the Bullet having to pull upwards with an extra 50 kg pillion, over the Duke being ridden solo.
Doc I agree with you fully. Infact you are the best guy to answer this question as you have ownership experience of both Doppie and a duke (I don't know her name)for extended period of time, much more than perhaps most in BHP. I was only quoting the paper specs as I have limited experience on a Bull ( a very short period in fact with a friend's TB) but to make a relevant point which perhaps influences most in this ride. Having said that what is your take in this discussion. Duke or Bullet??
ashkamath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2013, 16:00   #72
Senior - BHPian
 
ebonho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Pune
Posts: 3,942
Thanked: 3,178 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashkamath View Post
Doc I agree with you fully. Infact you are the best guy to answer this question as you have ownership experience of both Doppie and a duke (I don't know her name)for extended period of time, much more than perhaps most in BHP. I was only quoting the paper specs as I have limited experience on a Bull ( a very short period in fact with a friend's TB) but to make a relevant point which perhaps influences most in this ride. Having said that what is your take in this discussion. Duke or Bullet??
Any day of the year Duke man. The 200 climbs better than any 500. The 390 will only be better. Much better. You just have to ride both differently.

P.S. Btw Ashok, I think we have not met post the 2006 drag in Bangalore? Post that I owned (and later sold) two more Bullet 500s. One an LB Machismo 500 and the other a Chassic 500. In her prime, the LB was the best bike of the 3.

Last edited by ebonho : 16th December 2013 at 16:10.
ebonho is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2013, 16:09   #73
BHPian
 
ashkamath's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Vasco-Goa
Posts: 345
Thanked: 310 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
Any day of the year Duke man. The 200 climbs better than any 500. The 390 will only be better. Much better. You just have to ride both differently.
I guess this info will come as a relief to many Leh riders in this forum who are torn and pondering between Duke and Bull.
ashkamath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2013, 16:13   #74
Senior - BHPian
 
ebonho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Pune
Posts: 3,942
Thanked: 3,178 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashkamath View Post
I guess this info will come as a relief to many Leh riders in this forum who are torn and pondering between Duke and Bull.
This info on the Internet frankly adds nothing to the real world FACT that the top 3 bikes of last year's Raid were all Duke 200s. And a Bullet has never won the Raid. Ever.
ebonho is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2013, 11:21   #75
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 137
Thanked: 16 Times
Default Re: A Premium Bike for the Himalayas

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
This info on the Internet frankly adds nothing to the real world FACT that the top 3 bikes of last year's Raid were all Duke 200s. And a Bullet has never won the Raid. Ever.
Doc, The Dukes featured in the Raid have had their front ends modified, there might be other mods that are not visually apparent. Are these running stock suspension? or am I the only one that sees front shocks with longer travel. The front wire wheel seems to be a nineteen incher. The tires as anyone can see are dirt oriented . More details of these mods would be great and lend the Duke some real off-road cred.
Beast_of_Burden is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Premium bike sales doubled in 2012 Magnaspectre Motorbikes 1 28th April 2013 13:05
Pics : Landrovers and other suv's visit the Himalayas xtreme power 4x4 Excursions 68 28th February 2009 08:21
Raid-de Himalayas (Dial up pls users excuse!) Thil Indian Motorsport 2 7th March 2007 03:19
Return to the Himalayas, Sarahan yogesh sarkar Travelogues 6 20th May 2006 02:00
raid  the himalayas 06 sanket12 Indian Motorsport 10 20th January 2006 21:10


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 20:41.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks