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Old 13th October 2016, 12:43   #331
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Default Re: The Duke of Direwolves - Lisbeth, my KTM Duke 200

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Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
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Don't take this personally because you are not alone but, that first picture shows a chain that has been totally neglected.
Hi Jim,

Thank you for taking time to write a lengthy post to explain the importance of chain maintenance.

I agree that the chain looks rusty and not at all cared for, but be assured that the reality is far from it

I regularly clean and lube my chain on every alternate weekends - an average interval of 500-600 km, and adjusts the slack when required. The red color you see are the aftermaths of an off road ride I did couple of days before - I did not clean the chain because any way I was going to change it. Otherwise, I clean and lube the chain after each off road ride too.

I have been using tribocor chain clean and lube for last few years, but have switched to Motul from last month.

I usually warm up the chain a bit by riding the bike for few km, and then spray the cleaner liberally and use a grunge brush to loosen the dirt. After that, I use cotton waste to rub off the muck and apply the cleaner again if required. Once the chain is clean, I give it a final wipe with cotton waste and then I apply the lube and let it stand for at least half a day.

While Tribocor is an excellent lube, it is messy to apply and almost impossible to clean, and ends up collecting lot of dust and debris, so now I have switched to Motul, which is not messy (Tribocor is foam based, while Motul is like a clear liquid) but will require frequent application than Tribocor.

I do this whole exercise after popping my bike on the paddock stand, with engine switched off.

--Anoop
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Old 13th October 2016, 19:29   #332
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theexperthand
Don't take this personally because you are not alone but, that first picture shows a chain that has been totally neglected.
Could you please let me know if automated chain oilers like a scottoiler is a good way to go? What is your feedback on a system like this?
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Old 14th October 2016, 02:29   #333
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Default Re: The Duke of Direwolves - Lisbeth, my KTM Duke 200

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Could you please let me know if automated chain oilers like a scottoiler is a good way to go? What is your feedback on a system like this?
For those who don't know, the "Scottoiler" is a device which automatically oils the rear drive chain when it is installed and adjusted correctly.

It has a nozzle that is located above one of the rear chain spans (preferably the lower one) to direct the oil onto the chain.
It has a small oil tank on it and a vacuum operated valve which only allows oil to pass thru it to the nozzle when the engine is running.
A adjustable valve is present to control the amount of oil that flows out of the device.

While there is no denying the Scottoiler does a good job of lubricating the chain after it is adjusted properly, it does not eliminate the need to keep an eye on the chain.
Basically, it removes the need to manually lubricate the chain but it adds the task of keeping an eye on the oil level in the tank and refilling it with oil on a regular basis.

The price for these oilers is (IMO) VERY high.
On the web, I saw prices ranging from $100 to $140 for it.
Forgive me if I'm wrong but at the current exchange rate that would be about 80001333 rupee plus any taxation that would be added.

I mentioned a vacuum valve which keeps the oil from leaking out while the engine is off.

This valve requires a tube which is attached to a vacuum port on the inlet manifold between the carburetor or fuel injector and the inlet port on the engine.

I don't know about your Duke but on my Fuel Injected, Royal Enfield, 500 I would be out of luck. There is no vacuum port on my motorcycle.
If I decided to buy a Scottoiler and install it, I would need to drill and thread a hole in the aluminum inlet manifold.

To accomplish this without getting metal chips inside the engine I would have to remove the manifold, obtain the right tap drill and tap to thread the hole and then put it all back together again.

As I mentioned, it takes a bit of messing with the adjustment control, keeping an eye on the oil level and refilling it when it is needed and modifying my engine so it would work.

With the high cost of the unit as well as the cost of the oil that must be constantly added to it I will stick to using my spray can of PJ1 chain oil.

I can buy a LOT of chain oil for the cost of a Scottoiler and by lubricating the chain myself, I am able to see if any of the links are beginning to bind up.
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