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Old 17th March 2015, 15:24   #91
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Default Re: Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500

Hi,

I've found a simpler way to get the TB into neutral. I have the same bike as navin v_8 and almost same booking conditions. Went to the showroom and test rode the 500 - didn't check out any other option. I also have the marine blue color.

Anyway, this is what i do:

1. Gradually reduce the gearing, there is a sweet spot for the gear change, in the sense that you don't need to really press the front lever, a gentle tap would do. This has to come via practise only. As I reduce from 40kmph to 10...i slowly work the gears and shift easily to neutral. The best thing is to learn at which RPM to change the gear. I change for ever 10 km upgrade and similarly downgrade from 40kmph to 10kmph.

The problem most people have is that they many times try engaging the gear lever repeatedly, since these cogs don't match up everytime and at every request, there's always a possibility of the cogs engaging halfway. This is a dangerous situation as we would release the clutch lever and create mayhem!!

So, if by any chance i am still in gear, i stop the bike, switch off the engine and make it netural by slowly moving the bike forward and backward. This works for me. You can shift slowly and securely without the risk of gears holding up.
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Old 30th March 2015, 15:48   #92
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Default Re: Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500

Ride to Malshej…

All my TeamBhpian’s in and around Mumbai and Pune would be thinking what is it with me? March is not the season to ride to Malshej Ghats it is reserved for monsoon. But as they say for a rider season, destination and distance does not matter. I alongwith three other fellow riders decided to ride to Malshej ghat and explore the area. The riding itinerary was made and the dates were decided. We were to spent two days in MTDC Resort in Malshej ghat while exploring the area and visiting Pimpalgaon Joga dam, Shivneri fort, Lenyadri Caves, etc.

Day 1

Ready for ride
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150306070112.jpg

We started riding on 6th March which was Holi, we decided to meet up outside Viviana Mall Thane from where we would start riding towards Malshej ghat. We rode through the beautiful and engaging NH222, it is a single lane winding highway laid with ultra-smooth tarmac right upto Malshej ghat and beyond. We enjoyed the twisties and corners while riding on the ghat and this is where the magical handling prowess of the new Thunderbird was witnessed by the other two riders. I and fellow TeamBhpian Nick_Wanderlust were having a blast while riding through the twisties and corners on our Tbird’s. We were leaning while cornering while the bike provided superb handling and grip one can only dream of from a cruiser.

Breakfast Time
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What I have learned over the course of my riding so far is the new Tbird has a very powerful front brake and emergency braking makes its front tyre skid. So the technique I have started following is using progressive braking while splitting the braking between front and rear in 6:4 ratio. This ratio suits me while braking and the bike stops when asked to using this technique. Also while riding through the ghats I realized the Thunderbird’s 500cc engine climbs up effortlessly even on higher gears without knocking whatsoever. But I shift (downshift) the gears so as to run at the correct gear and optimum rpm. Nevertheless the torque band and flow is so addictive that one forgets to downshift while climbing and upshift while overtaking, it is almost like automatic transmission.

The long road
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150306105108.jpg

Taming the ghats
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150306113235.jpg

The ride was super good and we made stops in between for adequate breaks and photo sessions. We stopped at a highway dhaba and had local misal pav (very tasty and filling) with coffee. Once we hit the Malshej ghat I started my SMPDGPS (Smartphone Dedicated GPS) I use a smartphone as my dedicated GPS besides my regular smartphone. The GPS guided us properly to MTDC Malshej and we reached the resort by around 12.30.pm.

Band of Brothers
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150306115546.jpg

We unpacked and occupied our room which was a surprise. The room was in a beautiful location, it was spacious and had a private balcony overlooking the hills. These hills look like the Grand Canyon range in USA. The front side of the room overlooked the open air amphitheatre and a garden. We settled in and freshened ourselves up while keeping our bags and riding gears in the cupboard. It was lunch time and we had lunch in MTDC’s flamingo restaurant itself. Post lunch we rested for an hour or so and decided it was time to visit the Pimpalgaon Joga Dam. We didn’t know what is in store for us while riding towards the elusive dam.

Beautiful Landscape
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150306123645.jpg

I enquired with the local staff at the resort about how far is the dam and they said it is just 2 kms from here, I took out my GPS and it said it is about 20+ kms from the resort. Perplexed we decided to ride to 2 kms to find the damn dam. The dam which these people were calling was actually a bund constructed with stones. The real Pimpalgaon Joga Dam was about 20 kms from that spot. While I was still figuring out the route to the real dam, Nick decided to take an offroad trail to the water’s edge and we readily followed him while being cautious of the offroad trail strewn with small rocks and loose soil. I finally figured the route on my GPS and it still showed 20 kms. We all decided let us take this road () that goes to the village ahead and see if we can spot the dam. Surprise!! That village is about 5 kms from where we stand and the road towards that village is actually a dust trail strewn with small craters, bumps, stones and loads of dust. Just what we were looking for, we had enough of smooth tarmac it was now time to taste the offroad path. The devilish smile on Nicks face showed it all how we were eager to take that road, dam or no dam did not really matter at that point. We started riding and one rider among us who was a bit cautious said guys it is already 5.30.pm and as you all know the sun goes down early during this season, we should return back before it is too dark. We looked at each other for a minute or so and said let’s do it. We traversed through that dusty off road trail of 5kms in about 10-15 mins to reach the village at the tip. After crossing that village we asked a local about the dam and he said it will take you about 30 mins to reach the dam from here. We started riding and hit some rough patches; one was especially dangerous where there was a hairpin bend while descending down the rough road which was strewn with gravel and loose soil. We carefully maneuvered that pass and continued to ride. The backside country roads were a delight to ride especially the roads going up and down and like a see-saw and somewhere there were rough muddy patches where the Tbird just glided over. I took a look at the GPS once again to see that we are very close to the dam. I tried to spot the dam but couldn’t, so I asked a local villager about the directions and he pointed towards the right hand side. After riding for a couple of kms we could spot the dam, all this while we were following the lake that was on the right side of the road. It was a beautiful experience of riding in parallel to the lake.

Some mild Offroading for 10 Kms!
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-vlcsnap2015033015h36m57s206.png
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-vlcsnap2015033015h38m34s140.png
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-vlcsnap2015033015h39m26s142.png
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-vlcsnap2015033015h43m54s245.png

We finally reached the dam and the diversion road towards the dam was again rough and strewn with stones and dirt. Nick leaded us through a gate which was partially closed but we could sneak in through that space. We finally got the satisfaction of finding the damn dam and the ride that took us finding it was well worth. Suddenly a dam employee came towards us and shooed us from the site stating this is a restricted property and photography is not allowed. He asked us to leave immediately and we obliged. It was now 6.15.pm and the Sun was about to set. We started gunning the throttle and blazed towards MTDC resort. We shortly reached the village and onto that 5kms offroad trail which is built over the bund. This is where we had real fun, like Dakar rally riders we stood up on the footpegs of our bikes and rode it through the dirt trail at moderate speeds. Nick and other guy on his Bajaj Avenger took the lead and blinded us with a dusty trail left behind by their tyres, there was so much dust flying that we couldn’t see ahead. I and the other rider decided to stop for a minute till the dust settled and started riding again. It was now our turn to throw the dust on Nick and other guy, we had loads of fun while doing so. All this while we were rode safely knowing the limitations of the motorcycles and us. After the crossing that offroad stretch of about 5 kms we came back on the tarmac and took a very short break. By this time the sun had almost gone down and the light was fading. Our resort was just about 2kms from there so we took it easy and reached back to the resort. End of Day 1. At the end of the day I was just trying to back and see how the motorcycle behaved. It was awesome on the tarmac and equally at home on the offroad dirt trail. I checked the tyres and they were fine, the rear suspension is stiff but that is what aids in handling, tyres provide adequate grip both on the tarmac and offroad dirt tracks, one doesn’t has to bother about the fuel while going in the interiors as the 20 litre fuel tank has a terrific range. Whilst retiring to our room I wiped the motorcycle clean and said just two words to the bike, “Good Job”. Day 1 riding total 200+ Kms.

Day 2

It was day 2 and we had to visit two historical and iconic places named Shivneri fort and Lenyadri caves. We got ready had our breakfast and started riding towards Shivneri fort which is the birth place of Maratha King Shivaji. The road was nice and the morning sun lighted up the horizon, riding through the ghats on our thumping motorcycles which were tearing the silence was amazing. The views were breathtaking and the nature was splendid. We soon reached Shivneri fort, parked our bikes and started climbing on the fort. This is one fort which is very well maintained and there are steps which takes you to the top of the fort. We explored the fort and spent some time inside the fort.

Iconic Shivneri Fort
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150307102514.jpg
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150307102926.jpg

View from top of Shivneri Fort
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150307104722.jpg

The sun was blazing in all its glory and it started getting hot. We treated ourselves to some fresh lime juice and carried on. Our next destination was Lenyadri caves which takes about 280 steps from the bottom to reach the top. Lenyadri was about 8-10 kms from Shivneri fort and so we reached there soon. We climbed up the stairs and reached the top and explored the caves and the famous Ganesh temple located in one of the many caves. The caves were surprisingly cool compared to the raging hot temperature outside. We sat in one of the caves and took some rest.

Lenyadri Caves
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150307130705.jpg

After sometime we climbed down and decided to go for lunch at a nearby restaurant. We had a sumptuous Maharashtrian Thali and lazed around chatting at the restaurant. At around 4.30.pm. we departed for MTDC, on the way one of the riders was stopped by an old villager who wanted a lift till the next village which was on the way towards our resort. That old villager too had fun while sitting on that riders’ RE Bullet 500. We reached the resort at around 6.00.pm and called it a day. My observations at the end of day 2 was, the Tbird is supremely comfortable and does not make one feel tired, the ergonomics are spot on like the handlebar, soft cushion seat, front foot pegs which are pushed forward by 2 inches helps in keeping a relaxed posture, sharp and loud horn which aids in signaling the two legged cattle to make way and again the fuel tank range which does not bother the rider even after riding for 2 and a half days. Day 2 riding total 100+ kms.

The evening sunset
Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500-20150307183713.jpg

Day 3

It was time to ride back to Bombay from Malshej Ghat. We started from the resort at around 10.15.am. and everyone was in a mood to reach Bombay before lunch and we did. We started gunning our bikes once we exited the Ghats and were back on flat roads. The average cruising speed was around 80-90 KMPH. None of our reserve fuel light was blinking denoting we all got a fantastic mileage. It was all smooth till we hit Kalyan where we were greeted by unruly motorists, narrow roads and traffic. We zig zagged through the traffic and were soon back on the highway towards Thane. We reached Thane at around 12.45.pm. well before lunch as decided. It was a memorable ride and our motorcycles made it even more fun and engaging. We all patted ourselves on our back and the motorcycles for safely completing this ride. Day 3 riding total 160+ kms. Total Riding for all three days 460+ kms.

Coming up Third Free Service...
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Old 21st April 2015, 10:50   #93
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Default Re: Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500

Hello everyone, sorry for not updating this thread regularly. My Tbird500 had covered around 2700 odd Kms while it went for its third free service last month. There were no issues till the third free service happened, where the infamous RE service centre mechanics messed up a perfectly running motorcycle.

I booked an apppointment for the service as usual and was at the service centre gate 10 mins. before it opened. I got the job card filled and in addition to the oil change and other scheduled maintainence stuff asked them to repair or change the brake pedal as it had got bent due to an impact and also asked them to fit three allen screws that hold the silencer back cover as two of them screws disappeared one fine day. I also asked them to touch up the paint at one area near the rear fender, it was very minor maybe about 1-2mm thin area where the paint had scraped. The third free service consists of oil change, oil filter change, greasing and lubing the cables, etc. This time I also opted for chain lubing as the chain had become very dry. I got an SMS in the evening stating that my motorcycle is ready. The final bill came upto Rs. 1268.

Cost Breakup:
Chain Lubrication Rs. 175
Consumables-SAI Rs. 45*
Outside works / discripancies Rs. 100*
Engine Oil 2.75 litres Rs. 849
Element Oil filter Rs. 93

*What the hell are these consumables, outside works and discrepencies, I fail to understand. Maybe money making plot of the service centres.

I went to collect my motorcycle only to find that the regular service has been carried out but neither the brake pedal has been repaired or replaced nor have the allen screws been fitted, also the paint has not been touched up as requested. I approach the service centre manager and he says the now usual familiar lines, "Sir the parts are not there in the inventory and you can get the paint touched up during the next service."

I just shake my head and prepare to leave. Next day morning I decide to take the motorcycle out for a spin. I key in and thumb start the engine just to realize the engine is dying on me. I try again and this time wring the throttle a bit still nothing the engine just putters and dies. Wait!! Shoot!! I can smell petrol and some dampness on my left thigh. What the Hell!!! the fuel hose is spraying petrol like a pressure fountain where it connects to the fuel injector unit attached below the fuel tank. Thanks to being used to the CI Standard Bullet of yesteryears I dont panic and the greasemonkey inside me sprungs up.

I open the toolbox and take out the screwdriver to tighten the hose clip securing the fuel hose as I find it has become loose. Voila! the spraying of petrol stops and has never appeared till date. Maybe the jokers at the RE service centre forgot to tighten the fuel line hose clip, but wait why did they take it off in the first place?? Perhaps I will ask them next time.

Wait the fun is not over, as I rectify the loose hose clip and start riding I can hear a sound of the chain hitting somewhere. Fortunately my cousin on his KTM Duke 390 was following me and he waved his hand to me to stop. He says your chain has become very loose I can see it from behind. I reply in positive saying I too could hear the chain hitting somewhere and doubted the chain might have become loose. But how did it become loose? it was perfect before I gave it for the third free service. Oh yes those guys sprayed the chain lube and in the process might have played with the chain. I continue to ride till I find a garage as I am now on Thane Belapur road. Once I reach Kharghar I find a garage speciliazing in Bullets. I approach the mechanic and ask him to check the chain, he says it is too loose. He adjusts the chain by tightening it. I am still not satisfied as I find the setting too tight. On the way while returning I visit my mechanic and ask him to adjust the chain. Once done I was satisfied with the result.

My Thunderbird500 continues to ride well and I continue to enjoy my long rides.

Last edited by navin_v8 : 21st April 2015 at 10:54. Reason: Grammatical Errors
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Old 28th May 2015, 20:29   #94
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Dear Navin, in your pics, I can see that you have put a mobile stand. Can you please let me know if it is an India purchase and what brand. Mr Ravi has also suggested one from Ali express. Any guidance on which one to buy will be really helpful. Thanks
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Old 29th May 2015, 09:46   #95
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Dear Navin, in your pics, I can see that you have put a mobile stand. Can you please let me know if it is an India purchase and what brand. Mr Ravi has also suggested one from Ali express. Any guidance on which one to buy will be really helpful. Thanks
Hey Amar, the mobile holder is from Rynox Gear (known as Rynox Mobile Mount). It comes in two sizes 5 inch and 5.5 inch, I bought it from the Outdoor Travel Gear Store located in Bandra Mumbai. You can also buy it online directly from Rynox website. It is very useful and does not leave its place once fitted. It is also claimed to be water resistant but wont survive a heavy downpour, a mild drizzle yes.

Hope this helps.
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Old 30th May 2015, 09:50   #96
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Thanks Navin, got my bike last evening. One quick question, I understand one needs to follow this process to start the bike - key switch on, engine switch on, press clutch and then power button. While I am doing all this, bike does not start in one go, I have to give some throttle second time to get the engine to life. Anything I need to know to start in one go without pressing the throttle. Thanks
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Old 30th May 2015, 23:34   #97
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Default Re: Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500

Obviously, I'm not navin_v8 but perhaps this will help you start your new Thunderbird 500.

First, if the green neutral indicator light is illuminated the transmission is in neutral.

If this is true, you do not have to squeeze the clutch lever for the electrical starter to operate.
If the green neutral light is not illuminated you will need to pull in the clutch lever for the starter motor to work.
This can be handy if you are stopped in traffic with the transmission in gear and the engine dies.

IMO, when you get to your destination and want to turn your motorcycle off, it's a good idea to shift the transmission into neutral first. When the green neutral light comes on, then, shut off the engine. That way, the motorcycle will be all ready to start the next time you wish to.

Assuming the green neutral indicator light is lit, you can use your left hand to push the Bi-Starter valve lever on the left grip, fully towards its operating position. (A spring will return it to the "off" position as soon as you remove your thumb from the lever).

With the Bi-Starter lever pushed fully to the "on" position, now try your electric starter. The engine should start on the first few revolutions without you needing to apply any throttle.

Once the engine starts you can release the Bi-Starter lever. You should not need to do this after the engine is warmed up.

As your engine becomes broken in, little things like this will improve so you should not have to use the Bi-Start lever unless it is cold outside.

If, after the engine gets warmed up or after it gets some hours on it, you still need to use the Bi-Start valve to start the engine, take it to your dealer and tell him about the problem.
He should be able to adjust the throttle body so this extra step is not needed.

Ride Safe.
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Old 1st June 2015, 10:03   #98
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Originally Posted by Amar@Chadha View Post
One quick question, I understand one needs to follow this process to start the bike - key switch on, engine switch on, press clutch and then power button. While I am doing all this, bike does not start in one go, I have to give some throttle second time to get the engine to life. Anything I need to know to start in one go without pressing the throttle. Thanks
Amar first of all congratulations on getting the Tbird500 Marine (same pinch) . That's the correct procedure you are following as it is mentioned in the Owner's Manual. I am sure while you are doing this your motorcycle is in neutral gear. I too have experienced this phenomenon on my motorcycle as well as hundreds of other RE motorcycles(UCE Engines) with electric start. I need to give a very mild twist to the throttle while cranking to bring the motorcycle to life. I have seen many a riders practice this, while the bike doesn't start at the first crank and this includes cold as well as normal starts while you are at a signal, petrol station, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
Once the engine starts you can release the Bi-Starter lever. You should not need to do this after the engine is warmed up.

As your engine becomes broken in, little things like this will improve so you should not have to use the Bi-Start lever unless it is cold outside.

If, after the engine gets warmed up or after it gets some hours on it, you still need to use the Bi-Start valve to start the engine, take it to your dealer and tell him about the problem. He should be able to adjust the throttle body so this extra step is not needed.
Jim buddy I really admire the way you share so much information and knowledge about your experiences on this forum. Even I have this starting problem but I am not sure if I should call this is a problem. However it is clearly mentioned in the owners manual to engage only the starter button to start the engine and nowhere have they mentioned to use the throttle. I always keep the motorcycle in neutral while parking or while waiting at the signal. I need not use the bi-starter while starting the motorcycle in the morning since I stay in a hot and humid city of Bombay. Whenever I shut off the engine at a signal or while filling petrol or during such similar conditions I notice the bike takes longer to start (after reaching the operating temperature) while using the thumb starter. Sometimes I have to crank it twice or thrice to start the engine. I am not sure what this is about, as my battery too is healthy and the RPM is set as per factory settings.

Last edited by navin_v8 : 1st June 2015 at 10:13.
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Old 1st June 2015, 18:33   #99
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Thanks Navin, this is really helpful.
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Old 15th July 2015, 13:07   #100
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Time to update this thread about the 4th and last free service

There are no issues with my Tbird500 so far and it has been running and behaving well apart from some minor niggles. It was time to take it for the scheduled 4th and last free service. As usual I called up the RE authorized service centre to book an appointment for the scheduled service. I got a reply back saying that the appointment system is now stopped and we have to bring our motorcycles without taking any appointment. It is implied that RE service centres have now adopted the "First Come First Serve" basis of servicing or repairing ones motorcycle. I took my motorcycle to the service centre and was second in line at 9.15.am.(the service centre gate opens at 9.30.am.) I was asked about any issues or niggles I have faced while the service staff noted it down in the job card. I asked them to check the following issues:

1. Checking the chain slackness as well as lubricating it
2. Setting the correct RPM where it idles between 900-1000 RPM as it was idling at 1100-1200 RPM
3. "Kink" noise from the front fork while going through potholes, check and rectify the same
4. Engine check light comes on randomly sometimes when I kick start the bike and also stays on for about a second or so when I thumb start the bike
5. Kat kat noise from the engine when the motorcycle is started for the first time during the day

I am not sure if the service guy who was filling in the job card knew what all had to be done during the 4th free service. I got this thought because he was asking me what all needs to be done like changing engine oil, oil filter, etc. I told him the engine oil was changed during the third free service why do we need to change it again? This made me suspect if he knew what he was writing on that job card. I prompted him if he needs to refer to my owner's manual before taking my sign on the job card. He replied with a No. Instead I told him as per the owners manual the front fork oil needs to be changed alongwith brake fluid for both front and rear apart from topping up engine oil if needed. Phew! I left the service centre for my office.

I had to call the service centre to check whether the servicing was done or not, at first they said it is not done but after 3-5 seconds they said it is done. I asked the bill amount and they said it will be sent to you through SMS. I did receive the SMS and the bill amount came upto 1083 bucks. So much for the so called free service eh!

The 1st, 2nd, and 5th issue mentioned above were taken care of. Whereas the 3rd and 4th issue still remains. Albeit the third issue seems to be lesser than it was before. I need to ride it for a couple of weeks more to see if issue no. 3 and 4 crops up again.

The cost break-up (the cost mentioned below includes tax) for the scheduled fourth and last free service:
1. Outside works/discrepancies*: Rs. 775
2. Consumables-SAI*: Rs. 45
3. Chain Lubrication: Rs. 175
4. Battery Terminal cleaning and greasing: Rs. 50

From the past few services I have been inquisitive about this "Outside works/discrepancies". I enquired about this cost and was told it included the cost of fork oil. I smell a rat in these charges, have any one of you faced this?
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Old 18th August 2015, 21:26   #101
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Dear Friends, need one help, I had my first service done for my TB 500. While the gears have become very smooth and easy to find neutral, I feel that the bike has lost its pickup and also the engine sound has changed. Is this something you have experienced or any suggestions for me. I got my bike serviced at Banerghatta company service centre, which looked and felt really crowded and mis managed.
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Old 18th August 2015, 22:55   #102
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Also, the service icon has started flashing two days after the service, how do it switch it off? Thanks
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Old 19th August 2015, 07:44   #103
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Originally Posted by Amar@Chadha View Post
Also, the service icon has started flashing two days after the service, how do it switch it off?
Keeping the select+set buttons pressed together, switch on the ignition, switch off, and again, switch on the ignition. That will stop flashing of the service reminder icon.
Quote:
the bike has lost its pickup and also the engine sound has changed.
Please get the air filter, chain free play and spark plugs checked.

Last edited by J.Ravi : 19th August 2015 at 07:51.
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Old 19th August 2015, 09:59   #104
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Originally Posted by Amar@Chadha View Post
Dear Friends, need one help, I had my first service done for my TB 500. While the gears have become very smooth and easy to find neutral, I feel that the bike has lost its pickup and also the engine sound has changed. Is this something you have experienced or any suggestions for me. I got my bike serviced at Banerghatta company service centre, which looked and felt really crowded and mis managed.
Amar mate as far as I can remember my Tbird's performance after the first service. There was a world of difference in terms of gear shifts, pickup and overall smoothness of the engine. The engine sound(infamously called "kichi kichi kichi" sewing machine sound) became very smooth and vibrations became less. I remember the bike became more responsive after the first service. Like Ravi sir has suggested get your spark plug and air filter checked. I am not sure about the EFi tuning as it is a closed unit but tuning it cannot be ruled out. Also check your chain slackness it should neither be too tight nor too loose. I could feel a marginal drop in pickup when one of the mechanics over tightened the chain. I took it back to my regular mechanic and he set it right. After that I have had no such issues whatsoever.
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Old 6th February 2016, 15:20   #105
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Default Re: Undying hunger, my 5th Royal Enfield - The Thunderbird 500

Many Congratulations Navin. Your Blue Whale really looks amazing. I thoroughly enjoyed reading your Blog. Loved the bits of Mamma's Boy, Ladies in your apartment saying "The Love for Royal Enfield elevates the love for marriage", kids repeating "Thunderbird Thunderbird Thunderbird" after you and then your nephew showing what genes he got. Sure you should add up another ownership review. Shall be waiting for that.
I am also planning on a Thunderbird Blue Marine but the 350CC model.
God Bless and Drive Safe.
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