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Old 3rd July 2017, 16:10   #151
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

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Agree with the ABS part. But even the more powerful 44 BHP Duke 390 manages with a single disc at the front, so does other 40 BHP bikes like Ninja 300 and Yamaha R3.
+1
more than the twin disc setup at front, what matters is the quality of braking components.
I ride a 2014 Bonneville, it does just fine with a single disc setup for a 865cc mill. Whats different is the quality of brake and rotor components. For eg, a normal RE classic or thunderbird brake pad will cost 350 rs where as brake pad for a continental GT costs 2300 Rs. That brings one of the differences and i am not talking of the cost difference here. Even the new triumph classic range such as street twin and new T100 having 900cc engine have single disc setup. Only the Bonneville T120 gets the twin setup for the massive torque it generates.
Yes, whats most imp is to have the ABS, which i guess most modern bike will have going forward. And hoping and really wishing this time that RE surprises us and themselves with whatever they are building with twin pipes. Their previous two new platforms post the AVL 350 (UCE 350 & 500 & LS410) have been thoroughly disappointing from power and torque and refinement perspective, considering they are designed and developed from scratch in 21st century. hoping better show from RE as we all know they have huge potential, resources and funds.
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Old 4th July 2017, 10:59   #152
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

As long as the brake components like the pad material and the dics rotors are well built, braking wouldn't suffer much. Bajaj KTM bikes suffer from that problem. I had tried using a Duke 390 rotor on my Duke 200 ( later became OE standard on a 200) and better pads too but sadly the brake feel and performance always was inferior..probably because of the MRF tyres on the 200.
I'm hoping RE keeps the weight on check on this one. Those exhausts on the mule look heavy.
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Old 5th July 2017, 21:52   #153
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Okay, now as per latest reports, the upcoming Royal Enfield twin is not a 750cc, but a slightly smaller engine. The same article talks about 660cc and 500+cc engines, so a lower capacity engine is what is on the cards.

I personally like the idea, as we don't have roads for 750cc engines yet. So a 600cc twin could be really practical.

link: https://www.motorbeam.com/2017/07/bi...-india-abroad/
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Old 6th July 2017, 00:10   #154
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

My first thought after reading the link in aravind.anand's post is, the last thing buyers in the US would be interested in buying is a Royal Enfield 500cc twin.
It has no real advantages over a 500cc single and, knowing Royal Enfields philosophy on horsepower it could never be used on our freeways and interstate highways.

It also would not provide any reason to buy it in India as the tried and true RE 500 and 535 singles can do anything a 500cc twin can do.

To compete internationally (and with Harley and Triumph in India), whatever they come up with must be at least a 650.

Although a 750 might be a bit much for most riding in India, it offers one clear advantage over the smaller sizes.
It can be ridden "easier" so it is less stressed so it lasts longer.

Just because a 750 has a lot of power doesn't mean the rider needs to, or will use it often.
That allows the big engine to just cruise along easily with minimal stress.
That means, parts don't wear out rapidly.

There seems to be no end to the speculations the magazines can come up with and the one in the link is a fine example.

Let's hope Royal Enfield knows what size the engine is going to be.

Wait !
Maybe that is the reason it takes RE 5 or more years to develop a new motorcycle?

"Well, we've tested the 500, 535, 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750. One of these days we're going to have to figure out which one we are going to build."
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Old 6th July 2017, 14:36   #155
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

I agree a twin with a slightly larger bore size would be under-stressed and could cruise better than a single 535/ 500 and would last longer.
How it could compete with Triumph and HDs is questionable given the build quality I have seen on the Himalayan and other REs.
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Old 4th August 2017, 08:02   #156
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Got this from a facebook handle named 'Behind The Handlebar'.

Two slightly different GTish looking parallel twins can be seen in the pics. I wonder for how long they will test the mules. I am craving for a twin cylinder bike but unwilling to go for Harley Read out of budget.

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Last edited by Ry_der : 4th August 2017 at 08:12.
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Old 4th August 2017, 09:57   #157
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Umm, the bike that is farther from the camera has a very different looking tank!

Also, looks like Sirish Chandran from Overdrive has visited Royal Enfield's technical center in the UK, and the twin was probably shown to him. And he was quite excited about whatever he had seen there

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Old 4th August 2017, 15:12   #158
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

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Originally Posted by aravind.anand View Post
Umm, the bike that is farther from the camera has a very different looking tank!

Also, looks like Sirish Chandran from Overdrive has visited Royal Enfield's technical center in the UK, and the twin was probably shown to him. And he was quite excited about whatever he had seen there

Attachment 1663614
I'd take his excitement and water it down a notch or two.. after the Himalayan debacle I'd rather rely on real people testing the real article and not on flowered up articles by our country's auto journos.
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Old 4th August 2017, 21:21   #159
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ry_der View Post
Got this from a facebook handle named 'Behind The Handlebar'.

Two slightly different GTish looking parallel twins can be seen in the pics. I wonder for how long they will test the mules. I am craving for a twin cylinder bike but unwilling to go for Harley Read out of budget.

When I first saw this image on Whatsapp, I thought the second bike was actually a Triumph. Its good to see that RE has taken feedback from RE CGT owners seriously and given a second option with more relaxed ergonomics.


Also do my eyes deceive me or does the seat on the cafe racer have a Triumph Bobber-esque look?
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Old 5th August 2017, 20:00   #160
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

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Originally Posted by nasirkaka View Post
+1
more than the twin disc setup at front, what matters is the quality of braking components.
I never understood this until I switched from an RE Thunderbird 500 to a KTM Duke 390. The brakes and tires work together to give you grip and stopping power that I suspect violate the laws of physics sometimes. It was a revelation to me and I can't stop telling my friends to invest in better tires and/or brakes, rather than merely salivating at larger engines

Both the accidents I've had on Enfields were perfectly avoidable if they had reasonably good tires and/or brakes (both, ideally). There's no real point bolting a bigger engine onto an Enfield if stopping power is not also adequately addressed. Unless, that is, you plan on buying the 750 Enfield purely because you like the way it looks or for bragging rights.
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Old 5th August 2017, 23:17   #161
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

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Originally Posted by marcussantiago View Post
I never understood this until I switched from an RE Thunderbird 500 to a KTM Duke 390. The brakes and tires work together to give you grip and stopping power that I suspect violate the laws of physics sometimes. It was a revelation to me
The difference is that KTM (and most other proper motorcycle manufacturers) design motorcycles that are meant to be ridden, preferably hard. Not lifestyle accessories that require you to spend more time dressing up / putting on make up / posing / making disproportionate amounts of noise than actually riding.

A contraption that can neither go well nor stop properly - and breaks down randomly - is the latter. You are merely reaping the benefits of riding a proper motorcycle.

Sorry, just couldn't resist.

Last edited by Steeroid : 5th August 2017 at 23:24.
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Old 7th August 2017, 14:16   #162
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Unfortunately, I see quite a lot of people are actually pessimistic and unhappy than excited about the upcoming twin-cylinder bike from Royal Enfield. While I do understand that there are few personal experiences and reasons for this negativity towards the brand, I still think we should give this all-new twin-cylinder bike a chance, before we start putting it down.

PS: I am not endorsing RE here, just asking for a fair chance to be given to the effort they are putting in... I did the same in the Nexon thread, advocating for Tata, while people were accusing an all new product based on prior not-so-pleasant experiences.
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Old 7th August 2017, 15:40   #163
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

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Originally Posted by aravind.anand View Post
Unfortunately, I see quite a lot of people are actually pessimistic and unhappy than excited about the upcoming twin-cylinder bike from Royal Enfield.
I can figure your sentiment. They released the Himalayan and now again like the first Himalayan video, we have a correspondent or whoever talking about something exciting- but unless the bikers at large see a good quality vehicle from RE, not one person will be willing to put his money on the bike.
Of course there are the money'ed fools who will buy it to be the first in the market- but those kinds exist across all brands be it RE, Triumph or the Harley.

The case here, the Himalayan, BS-IV version is supposed to be vastly improved, then I wonder what they tested before it was released? Likewise, these two bikes seen, are being chased by a Service Van, and am sure to please some managerial clown, they will probably send an 'All OK' report every night to Chennai.

This is why people worry or look at RE with cynicism. Again the possibility, a haphazard bike- launched by the same people who questions 'Why do you need more horsepower?,' at the Himalayan launch.
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Old 7th August 2017, 17:27   #164
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

Quote:
Originally Posted by aravind.anand View Post
Unfortunately, I see quite a lot of people are actually pessimistic and unhappy than excited about the upcoming twin-cylinder bike from Royal Enfield. While I do understand that there are few personal experiences and reasons for this negativity towards the brand, I still think we should give this all-new twin-cylinder bike a chance, before we start putting it down.

PS: I am not endorsing RE here, just asking for a fair chance to be given to the effort they are putting in... I did the same in the Nexon thread, advocating for Tata, while people were accusing an all new product based on prior not-so-pleasant experiences.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer & Anvil View Post
I can figure your sentiment. They released the Himalayan and now again like the first Himalayan video, we have a correspondent or whoever talking about something exciting- but unless the bikers at large see a good quality vehicle from RE, not one person will be willing to put his money on the bike.
Of course there are the money'ed fools who will buy it to be the first in the market- but those kinds exist across all brands be it RE, Triumph or the Harley.

The case here, the Himalayan, BS-IV version is supposed to be vastly improved, then I wonder what they tested before it was released? Likewise, these two bikes seen, are being chased by a Service Van, and am sure to please some managerial clown, they will probably send an 'All OK' report every night to Chennai.

This is why people worry or look at RE with cynicism. Again the possibility, a haphazard bike- launched by the same people who questions 'Why do you need more horsepower?,' at the Himalayan launch.
Spot on , this takes me back to the discussion or rather argument we had on the Himalayan thread regarding the apparent testing the good folks at RE might have carried out prior to launch. Now that I'm a certified Himalayan guinea pig, what with having sent that pos to the service centre 8 times in the 1 year that I've owned it ; I see what you were getting at then.
@ arvind.anand : believe me when I say that RE doesn't deserve anything more than a negative outlook for any of their future products , they need to be kicked in the behind and dragged to court. I was one of the optimistic lot that said give RE a chance , you can view my posts and hammer &anvils in the Himalayan thread. Now I wish I had listened to h&a and saved myself money and time ..

Last edited by howler : 7th August 2017 at 17:47.
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Old 7th August 2017, 23:07   #165
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Default Re: The Twin-Cylinder 750cc Royal Enfield

IMO, buying any vehicle during the first year of its release is risky.

All vehicle companies do extensive road tests on their new design before it is released for production. That's why we get these candid pictures of new motorcycles riding on public roads.

That said, no company can afford to have its test riders ride millions of km before the product is released for production. There simply isn't enough manpower or time to do the job.

After the motorcycle like the Himalayan is released, thousands of them sell.
As people know, the Himalayan has sold well over 10,000 during its first year on the market.

If these 10,000+ riders start riding their motorcycles and each rides for a distance of 1,000 km, that equals 10 million km of new information.

Problems that went undetected during the factory test sessions are bound to show up.

If the company is smart, it will address the newly found problems as soon as possible and usually by the end of the first year of production, most of the major problems will have been fixed.

By the time the second year of production reaches the half way mark, most of the small problems will have been fixed.

This is not to say that there will not be some problems.

By this time, sales have added tens of thousands of additional riders are adding millions of km to the information pool and those motorcycles that were originally sold during the first year of production are beginning to get a lot of distance on them.
Those high distance motorcycles can reveal other problems that come with long term stress (and abuse) and small design issues.

By the third year of production, usually, most if not all of the problems will have been fixed so it is pretty safe to buy one.

When they release the Big Twin, we can expect to see the same learning curve.
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