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Old 5th July 2016, 10:24   #361
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by petrolhead_neel View Post
Hi there,

I really liked your ride report and your views do match with mine.

Ideally, the Himalayan should be able to do at least 100-110 km/h quite comfortably, even with a pillion. A long test ride should be able to confirm whether you are at your comfort zone riding the bike at those speeds or not.

Regards,
Neel
Thanks. This was a ride report of one who is desperate to get back on two wheels after a year of non riding. Hope i can get my hands on one of these beauties soon.

Yes, if the Himalayan can manage doing 100-110kph with relative comfort, this bike is a done deal for me.

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Owning a Thunderbird 500 all I can say is, the bike can touch 130/140kmph doing single and almost 125-130kmph with pillion, but is it comfortable doing that all day? No. The best speed for cruising is around 80kmph, but again its a slow moped for a 500km a day long run.
Agreed. I ride my Uncles UCE 350 sometimes and its great... till you have to go over 70kph. My experience says the ideal cruising speed on out highways is at most 120kph, above with the amount of concentration that you need to put in exceeds the advantage of the time saved.

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Originally Posted by dkaile View Post
Tiger is a excellent tourer, best in it's category, and I respect it for what it is, but for the value and overall package it offers, the Himalayan stands apart. You may have all the displacement you want, but then the roads and infrastructure causes more harm than good if that displacement is used to its full potential. The rationale given to me by some of these big bike owners, one of which I own myself, is to taper down your riding style to suit our conditions. If tapering down ultimately needs to be done to ride in India, that is where a package like the Himalayan comes into the picture with the right amount of power and grunt to tackle our terrain with aplomb.

Cheers....
I 100% agree. High capacity bikes are more to do with aspiration and show that actual utility. Whats the point of buying a 200 bhp bike and then having to putter along at 100 kph (anything iver that is suicidal...) using 30 of those bhps? After riding many of those bikes, i am confident that a well sorted bike with even lower power figures can be of far greater value especially when it comes to touring.

Last edited by naturaldisaster : 5th July 2016 at 10:29.
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Old 5th July 2016, 12:17   #362
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Ideal Indian bike for long term touring is the one which has about 40/50 bhp, six gears, can comfortably cruise at 100/120 without vibrations, if needed can accelerate to about 160/180kmph, weighs about 150kgs dry and has got great ergonomics for two up touring with space for luggage. Any manufacturer dare to cater to this segment? Or are they all still caught up in their boy racer fantasy?
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Old 5th July 2016, 12:52   #363
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Ideal Indian bike for long term touring is the one which has about 40/50 bhp, six gears, can comfortably cruise at 100/120 without vibrations, if needed can accelerate to about 160/180kmph, weighs about 150kgs dry and has got great ergonomics for two up touring with space for luggage. Any manufacturer dare to cater to this segment? Or are they all still caught up in their boy racer fantasy?
180 on two wheels on our highways? No thanks. I wouldn't do that on even cars actually. Vibe free cruising at 100-110, 6 gears and the added reassurance from ABS is what would make a bike touring friendly in our nation.

So I suppose the Himalayan is good as a package, but I would still nag RE to give me FI and ABS to complete the package.

PS: I am a sane rider who cruises between 80-90 mostly on my 65 km rides to office everyday. One day, one lapsed moment of concentration, one gaze into the rear view mirror, and a cow caught me out... got me rolling on the highway (literally)
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Old 5th July 2016, 14:23   #364
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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So I suppose the Himalayan is good as a package, but I would still nag RE to give me FI and ABS to complete the package.
I never felt the need for ABS atleast on a bullet. The bike is heavy, big tyres and pretty decent brakes. To me the brembo combination GT series is so good that, thats one bike which doesnt need the rear brakes at all. I am trying to retrofit my bull with the GT brakes but it takes more than simple mods. But working on it.

If RE can simply get those Brembo 300mm on himalyan it would be a sweet deal.
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Old 5th July 2016, 16:23   #365
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Even though I took a test ride near the end of March, I thought I should share my experience here. The test ride I took was through Garg Motors, Sector 32, Chandigarh.

The test ride bike was one of those used in the Shimla journalist ride organised by RE. It had a TN number and had a lot of scrapes and dents.

Physical inspection notes:
1. Very little corrosion on weld joints in the chassis, some nuts and bolts... for an Enfield. My old P220 had almost as much rust after 4 years. Not bad at all. Most RE's rust a lot and quickly.
2. Once seated, ground clearance is about average, not a lot.
3. The rear shock mount extends below the line of the chassis when seated. This is the lowest point and might be a problem as I will mention later.
4. Instrument console is really cluttered and could be better designed and arranged.
5. General build quality is pretty good. Something not expected of RE.
6. Oil cooler location is not good. It was caked with fine mud.

The ride (with 50kg salesman riding pillion):
1. Took a long time to start. Several cranks before there was any life.
2. Once started, it would not idle. Idling rpm had to be raised by adjusting the relevant screw on the carb.
3. Did a brake check after starting off. Brakes do their job. Rear brake has a sharp bite while front required a bear grip.
4. Opened the taps. Engine revved very freely (after a looong warm up) and the bike pulled very nicely. Not a beast and more power is needed but it didn't feel underpowered either.
5. Picked up speed quickly but I was riding it like I ride my Duke 200. Changed gears at 6000 rpm and it felt nice and smooth even at the limit when I hit 100kmph in 3rd gear.
6. But it didn't sound smooth at all. It had a valve train clatter similar to a Pulsar with a worn out timing chain or a Bullet with worn out rockers and valve guides and slapping valves.
7. Not once did I hit 5th gear. Engaged 4th gear only once just for the sake of it. Gear indicator in the console has a long delay before it realises that you have shifted.
8. Very easy to maneuver through traffic regardless of speed.
9. Once took a corner too fast which made the salesman clench up and made me rethink my approach. The bike carried the speed through the corner very gracefully without springing any surprise or expressing disagreement.
10. The handling dynamics are very neutral so it is rider friendly.
11. The front 21" wheel makes its present felt in the way bike responds to an input to change direction. Gyroscopic effect was quite prominent but not a problem.
12. Suspension is stiffer than my old P220's so feedback is better.
13. Rode over a small speedbreaker at high speed and the bike was very composed.
14. Found an open ground nearby and rode the bike over the very average sized kerb. My Duke 200 would easily go over it. The Himalayan bottomed out! Remember I mentioned the rear shock mount appeared to be the lowest point of the bike. The metallic thud could have been the centre stand or it could have been the shock mount. I know what the Bullet's and Pulsar's stand sounds like when it hits concrete or tarmac but not the Himalayan's.
15. Rode the bike through 1-2 feet wide smoothly graded craters and even took a U-turn through them and it was so easy even with a light pillion rider! Handlebar height helped here.
16. Locked the rear brake (with pillion rider) intentionally and with ease and turned the bike 90 degrees on returning to the showroom. Good bite in the rear disc and very composed stance.
17. Idling rpm went up to 2000+ when we stopped which probably means the pilot mixture is a bit lean. The engine was nice and hot.

Bottomline:
I wanted to trade in my Duke for a Himalayan right away but will wait for the issues to be sorted out and for the Adventure which is coming by the end of 2016. Decision will come after.

Last edited by Darth Sid : 5th July 2016 at 16:35. Reason: Updated a couple of points
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Old 6th July 2016, 11:33   #366
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Ideal Indian bike for long term touring is the one which has about 40/50 bhp, six gears, can comfortably cruise at 100/120 without vibrations, if needed can accelerate to about 160/180kmph, weighs about 150kgs dry and has got great ergonomics for two up touring with space for luggage. Any manufacturer dare to cater to this segment? Or are they all still caught up in their boy racer fantasy?
+1 to that.

I am hoping that the 'rumored' twin cylinder from RE should be able to meet the mark on most of those counts - except for maybe the weight one! No way that a twin cylinder from RE will weigh 150 kg - even the singles exceed that by quite a bit
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Old 6th July 2016, 12:46   #367
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by aravind.anand View Post
180 on two wheels on our highways? No thanks. I wouldn't do that on even cars actually. Vibe free cruising at 100-110, 6 gears and the added reassurance from ABS is what would make a bike touring friendly in our nation.

So I suppose the Himalayan is good as a package, but I would still nag RE to give me FI and ABS to complete the package.

PS: I am a sane rider who cruises between 80-90 mostly on my 65 km rides to office everyday. One day, one lapsed moment of concentration, one gaze into the rear view mirror, and a cow caught me out... got me rolling on the highway (literally)
I am sure every bike can do a sane 60/70/80/90 if you so desire. I said it needs to have enough power to go at 180kmph if needed, not because it needs to be stuck at 180kmph every time it is ridden
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Old 6th July 2016, 12:47   #368
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Sorry to butt in the ideal bike discussion. I wanted to know the exact way of getting rid of the spanner icon on the dial of the Himalayan. I got my first service done at 410 kms, and the spanner icon came on at 450 km. I covered 750 km till today and went in the ASC to get the service indicator icon switched off. They somehow ended up resetting the whole odometer itself. Apparently they held the Trip button and Hazard lights button for almost a minute to reset the service icon, though it did reset the service icon it also reset the odometer (I think the service icon got reset owing to the odometer being reset).

They had a chat with some RE engineer and it's the first case that they've experienced. They think it's a faulty instrument cluster and they'll be replacing it.

Someone posted on this or some other Himalayan thread on how to switch from miles-km and vice versa (according to them, it also resets the service icon). I had tried that too earlier, but though it did switched from km to miles. It did not reset the service icon.

Any help on this?
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Old 6th July 2016, 13:33   #369
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by maker_of_things View Post
Someone posted on this or some other Himalayan thread on how to switch from miles-km and vice versa (according to them, it also resets the service icon). I had tried that too earlier, but though it did switched from km to miles. It did not reset the service icon.

Any help on this?
Ideal thread to post this query is RE technical discussion thread. I think your console is faulty because we reset it in a similar fashion on the TB. However the odometer doesn't get reset.
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Old 6th July 2016, 15:08   #370
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Quote:
Ideal Indian bike for long term touring is the one which has about 40/50 bhp, six gears, can comfortably cruise at 100/120 without vibrations, if needed can accelerate to about 160/180kmph, weighs about 150kgs dry and has got great ergonomics for two up touring with space for luggage. Any manufacturer dare to cater to this segment? Or are they all still caught up in their boy racer fantasy?
Except for the weight, the Versys 650 has all the ingredients + more, of-course at a premium price comparatively. Its also gives a big tank capacity, very well sorted adjustable suspension, Good brakes with ABS, good adjustable wind protection, quality parts and lots of customization options, luggage provisions etc. It may not be a steal at its retail price but is decent value for money, esp compared to competitors. a lot of riders wanting to upgrade from touring on RE would be very happy with this. i, definitely am.

Last sunday, myself and Red-Liner went on a 350kms ride around Bangalore covering all types of roads from broken narrow village roads, to twisties, a few hairpins, state highway, and 3x3 lane national highway and the versys is very close to the ideal touring bike for our conditions. The suspension is something to be experienced, rather described. It just glides over whatever the terrain throws. Dual sport tyres would only enhances the bikes capabilities. The versys is so versatile that every morning my hand reaches for its keys to commute to work (yes, in Bangalore), rather then the 390's.

OK, Enough on Versys, this thread is about Himalayan. I need to trade my 390 with a bike which is more comfortable with ergonomics and suspension. Was initially eying Himalayan for that, but after a short test ride, am not thoroughly convinced. Will wait for something more interesting to come by like a 390 adv? BMW/TVS Adv? or something else? lets see...

Quote:
I never felt the need for ABS atleast on a bullet.
panic braking on a bullet is very scary. These bikes generate a lot of momentum cos of their weight, and skid along when brakes are slammed.
The below picture could have been avoided if there was ABS. that my hand and my machismo 350. Even my 2010 C5 was equally disappointing when it came to braking.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by nasirkaka : 6th July 2016 at 15:21.
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Old 6th July 2016, 22:49   #371
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Ideal thread to post this query is RE technical discussion thread. I think your console is faulty because we reset it in a similar fashion on the TB. However the odometer doesn't get reset.
Thanks apachelongbow. How long do you hold the buttons for resetting the service icon on the TB?
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Old 7th July 2016, 06:59   #372
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by maker_of_things View Post
Any help on this?
I am facing a similar issue. The service icon flashing is not going away by holding both the hazard and trip button for 30 seconds. I did not try for a minute as you have stated. It changes from miles to kms and vice versa in this 30 second hold but does not reset the flashing service icon. Looking for a resolution too.

Cheers...
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Old 7th July 2016, 10:51   #373
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by nasirkaka View Post
The versys is so versatile that every morning my hand reaches for its keys to commute to work (yes, in Bangalore), rather then the 390's.


I cant help but comment on this. I was in Bangalore for a couple of months and was planning to move permanently. Loved the place but one thing was sure. Its not a city to use a car for daily commute. So i started looking for bikes that would fit my requirements. Having said this, i have been eyeing the 390 for quite a while since after my Ninja 250, i am not really fond of fully cowled bikes in India.

The only bike that i felt would suit me then was the Pulsar AS200. I felt that the 390 is way too powerful to use in that city (akin to using a superbike for daily commute in Delhi). Every single 390 i have seen passing by during my 2 months was puttering along at below 4k rpm

But ill say this. Had i shifted to Blore and picked up the AS200 and THEN test ridden the Himalayan, i would have been a very pissed off guy.
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Old 7th July 2016, 14:21   #374
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Looking for a resolution too.

Cheers...
Thanks dkaile, do let me know if you come across a solution. For now, I'll be waiting for the new ICE to arrive and be replaced. And I'll check if that solves the issue.

Cheers!
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Old 8th July 2016, 15:16   #375
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Originally Posted by maker_of_things View Post
do let me know if you come across a solution.
I have posted the resolution here - http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorb...ml#post4011454 (Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer)

Cheers...
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