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Old 11th April 2016, 18:40   #121
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by sandeepmohan View Post
The Himalayan hit the ton without protest. I was not very happy with the engine note at certain engine speeds. The sound reminded me of the piston slapping the cylinder walls. The bike had close to 3000km on the odometer. The engine was spinning at around 5150 rpm at 110kmph. You are not going to pull away quickly beyond the ton though. There is not much in terms of reserve power at this point. You have another 1500 rpm or so left. The engine felt at home even at this engine speed. It did feel like you could sit all day at a shade above the ton.
Sorry, one off topic question. Why do some of the members refer to 100 kmph as ton? Isn't ton supposed to be the 1000 mark? I may be ignorant to the ton metric in speed but I am pretty sure it is 1000 in weight metric. Perhaps, it is a new slang in the automotive world?
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Old 11th April 2016, 18:50   #122
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by zzzehar View Post
Sorry, one off topic question. Why do some of the members refer to 100 kmph as ton? Isn't ton supposed to be the 1000 mark? I may be ignorant to the ton metric in speed but I am pretty sure it is 1000 in weight metric. Perhaps, it is a new slang in the automotive world?
Ton comes from the era of cafe racing when those bikes were modified to do the ton-up, translating to 100 mph, which was quite a lot for road-going bikes at that time. More on this here:

Link 1

Link 2

Since, we follow the metric pattern in India. Doing the ton-up here refers to doing 100 kmph.
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Old 11th April 2016, 19:45   #123
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Perhaps, it is a new slang in the automotive world?
It is not new at all. In the automotive world, using the term "ton" has always referred to hitting one hundred kilometers per hour. I don't have anything to prove my claim except that I have been hearing this for quite some time.
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Old 12th April 2016, 18:11   #124
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Hi all, let me take an opportunity to write my experience, pretty lengthy typing today !

I have been following on the RE Himalayan since quite some time. On the Youtube, saw the pre-launch and launch videos, review & test ride videos, reading various forums etc. This one surely made me MORE interested in RE (I don’t own any bike).

About two weeks back, I did go inside the nearby Royal Enfield showroom, had a glance and came out, saw a black Himalayan parked outside the store. That time, I didn’t speak with anybody in the showroom, I had a good look on the vehicle, even sat on it for a moment, just for the feel of it !
Initial Impression, then: The vehicle is quite big, long and meaty. Seats were really comfortable. The matt black color didn’t appeal much, maybe the dust on vehicle or surrounding, or whatever.

Finally, I had a Test Ride on Himalayan on Saturday 09-Apr'16, at Unison Automobiles (Mira Road). I went inside the store and inquired about H, a young sales rep pretty courteously asked me to sit, and came-up with a pricelist of RE, marking the H costings. He explained that H is carburettor, had good torque, an easy going vehicle; and though RE hasn’t officially given any FE number it would still (hopefully) return 35-38 KMPL. Upon my asking, he said delivery period for H would be about 2 months, and of STD500 (another ride of my interest) would be within 1 month, as its quite popular & running successfully to cater to demands.
Then he asked me “when are you planning to buy”, and I answered “not sure yet to even buy any, but I would like to have a test ride now”. Another colleague asked my license and kept with him. I calmly asked “test ride, without me carrying the license ?”, he smiled and said “don’t worry sir, no problem”. Even I didn’t push much, and was confident of nothing happening to me in “my area” !

The young RE chap came with a helmet for me, got the black-H on the road, it was the same piece I saw few days back (I remember because it had a scratch on the tank). About myself: Im 6’ 1” tall, 95 KGs. About pillion RE chap: about 5’6”, about 60-65 KGs.

I sat on the bike, the chap sat as pillion. For some moments, I was trying to feel it, planted my legs on ground, gazing around. Though the bike looks big, it was very comfortable height for seating. I located the start button and it fired, raised the accelerator a bit, whoowhoooo, the exhaust note was not bad! Pressed the clutch, it was not hard and reasonably smooth, put in 1st gear, and it slotted perfectly. The gear slotting was really perfect, speaks of getting confidence. Gradually I got riding on the busy road, and noticed that speed indicator (and maybe even ODO) was disconnected. I again glanced at the overall console and found it interesting, flashy displays, ODO showed some 250 KMs, Gear position shown, RPM needle was moving, though didn’t / couldn’t ‘read’ the compass.

I continued in the 1st gear pretty comfortably, found the engine to be smooth and didn’t hesitate, didn’t urge me to upshift gear. However I naturally changed to 2nd gear, again it slotted perfectly, wow. The torque was pretty good, and within no time I could feel attaining 40-50 speed, with ease. Did have to apply brake due to heavy traffic, put the bike in Neutral, and again it was perfect slot. Some bikes have very smooth gears even with a gentle tap, this wasn’t smooth (or light), but the ‘click’ slotting was really good, without actually feeling the hardness. The handle was wide, comfortable, not really very light weight, but just good to feel and manoeuvre with confidence. The mirrors didn’t do justice, they should have been placed bit wider. On top of that, the left mirror was kaput, used to bend down. I didnt feel the pillion being pushed to me, and I think there was a bit gap between us; or maybe he was sitting very cautiously not to push me!

Took a right turn onto another road and tried to open the throttle quickly, after getting good speed clicked to 2nd gear. Turning radius seems good, thought I wasn’t personally confident of turning it fast. Wow, real good ride quality, and good acceleration (or torque I may say). For a brief moment I could get to 3rd gear, but didnt really felt the need of same. Its like there was still some juice left in the 2nd gear. From a stand-still I even tried starting with 2nd gear, no issues. Pot-holes and bumps were easily taken care of. Cant really feel the actual weight of the bike. At about 15-20 speed, I braked really hard (front + rear), and bike came to a halt, with a slight amount of skidding on rear wheel. I couldn’t gauge the effectiveness of the windscreen, but it was surely below my face level which I feel was ideal. The material looks sturdy (not saying about the mounts), but the transparency (clarity) wasn’t very sharp. I got a feel that over a time it may turn dull, like those cheap plastics turning faded yellow. I maybe totally wrong on this.

Came back to the store and parked the vehicle. The overall ride was not more than 3-4 KMs, on busy traffic road. The ride experience was superb. I later had a detailed look on the vehicle, and some of the weld marks were not a good sight, some quality improvement is required. Went inside the store, collected my license, and filled the feedback form, along with my details.

so friends, this was my experience with Himalayan! I wrote what I felt, and remembered of it.

regards,

Last edited by pcpranav : 12th April 2016 at 18:17.
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Old 12th April 2016, 19:42   #125
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

I picked up my Himalayan on April 4th. Tomorrow it goes for its first service.

Himalayan Feedback after 500km

Pros:
  • Comfortable seat
  • overall fit and finish much improved from other Enfield bikes.
  • Smooth engine with very little vibration (only at higher rpm).
  • Bright headlight with good visibility
  • Cruises around 80kmph very peacefully and the torque the engine has at that speed still allows you to stay ahead of most traffic on the road.
  • Front end of the bike has a quirky design language but rear section is good.
  • Good suspension, takes the road in its stride and does not get unsettled with typical indian road conditions.
  • Good fuel economy. 450km on a single tank!.
  • Good value for money


Cons:
  • Very Low power
  • Front brake lacks bite. needs too much pressure. Not confidence inspiring.
  • Tappet noise is too much for a "modern" engine. During low speed cruising I can hear the tappets more than the exhaust!
  • Side stand has an indicator but does not cut the engine if you try to move with the stand down
  • Windscreen is a bit too short for tall riders. Lots of helmet wind noise at cruising speeds.
  • Gearbox is notchy and not always easy to find neutral. Some false neutrals also.
  • Fit and finish issues:-
  • Had some white sealant paste visible around the opening on the left side engine compartment where the electrical cable exits.
  • Lower part of the Triple tree forgings has poor quality finish
  • An allen bolt missing at delivery from the right side Himalayan logo under the seat
  • Dashboard and meters look nice but the colors chosen and transparent needles make it difficult to see the readings. A higher contrast plain white opaque needle would have been better.
  • Dont understand the idea of showing ambient temperature but not engine temperature. The location of the sensor of the ambient temperature is also suspect since the temperature is a combination of ambient and heat emanating from the engine so it is not clear what purpose it serves.
  • Headlight is frame mounted which makes the light not follow the direction of the handlebar
  • Headlight is not linked to engine running, could drain the battery if accidentally left on
  • Emergency flasher switch is on the dashboard instead of the left hand handlebar as most bikes have. This requires you to take your hand off the handlebar to switch the emergency flasher on.
  • Doesnt always start on first crank, especially in the mornings.
  • Engine idling varies too much with engine temp. Cold engine the engine barely ticks over and sometimes stalls, Warm engine it idles at 2000 rpm!
  • After 500 km the exhaust tubes are already discolored from the heat
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Old 12th April 2016, 19:48   #126
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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I picked up my Himalayan on April 4th. Tomorrow it goes for its first service.
Buying a new bike and not showing its pics or having an ownership thread here is a serious offence, that is so not right bro !!

I demand pics !!
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Old 12th April 2016, 19:55   #127
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Buying a new bike and not showing its pics or having an ownership thread here is a serious offence, that is so not right bro !!

I demand pics !!
ok. Ok. Ok.. I apologize...

Here are a few pictures
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 12th April 2016, 20:31   #128
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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I picked up my Himalayan on April 4th. Tomorrow it goes for its first service.
[*]Tappet noise is too much for a "modern" engine. During low speed cruising I can hear the tappets more than the exhaust!
Ask for valve clearance adjustment in your service. Should help with the tappet noise.

And exhaust header discoloration happens in all vehicles. Don't know why you've kept it in cons.

Also, can you share details of which grade of oil they're using? 15w50 or something different/mineral of synthetic etc.?
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Old 12th April 2016, 21:06   #129
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

The Royal Enfield Himalayan - Road & Off road riding experience

Last Sunday, Royal Enfield put together an event showcasing the Himalayan and allowing folks test rides on road and also on a specially created off road track. This was a "by invitation only" event and many thanks to fellow member @Aditya_Bhardwaj for getting me on the list

The motorcycle:

Much has been said about the looks etc. of the bike and by now we all pretty much know the specs by heart, so wont bore you with those details. People either love the way it looks or hate it, and I am in the "Love it" camp

Whilst going through the bikes, my eyes fixated on the rather ugly weld marks on the chassis and I pointed the same out to the RE rep there. He smiled and walked me over to another set of bikes. These, he said, were the bikes from the latest lot. No ugly welds there, very clean. So hopefully, people who have already booked their bikes should be getting clean examples

I sat on the bike and the first thing I could feel was the comfort. I am a tad over 6 feet in my riding boots and was at home on the Himalayan. If I had to nit pick, I would not mind the seat height to be a bit taller and the crevice on the tank to be placed further forward, as my knee would almost foul against it time to time

The console was very cluttered though, did not like it. I would have preferred that:

- The speedo and RPM gauge to be interchanged
- Lose the compass. Too wannabe IMO
- Just keep it simple - 2 trip meters, a speedo, bigger tacho, fuel gauge and engine temp should more than suffice
- I am glad that it has a gear indicator though

Exhaust note:

Thumbed the starter and the bike came to life in an instant. Gave it a bit of gas and .... it actually sounds nice. Most people around me were actually nodding in agreement. On the other hand, there was another Himalayan with the "off road" exhaust that I found to be very loud and garish. Sort of like the horrible "free flow" types you find on the pulsars and other 150 cc bikes. It looks exactly the same as the stock exhaust though

Road test:

I rode the bike for a sum total of around 20 kms (2 separate trips), most of which included the NH8 & a KM or so of broken tarmac (Kapashera road, leading up to NH8)

Took the bike out of the venue and was immediately greeted by heavy traffic and lots of deep pot holes. Lets all please remember that this thing weighs a 182 KGs, not lightweight by any stretch of the imagination AND has a 21 inch front wheel. So flick ability should not be its forte. But surprisingly, it is very nimble. I could filter through traffic so easily. The long travel suspension makes little work of giant crater like potholes. No exaggeration, but you dont even feel them. Just open the throttle, stand up on the pegs and the bike will do the rest. Impressive!

The ergos are another thing that left me impressed. The handlebars fall right in place, the footpegs are very well positioned. In fact, this is the first ever motorcycle where I could stand on the pegs and shift gears almost as comfortably as I could sitting down

On the highway, I whacked open the throttle and going by the comments here I was expecting a very slow, lethargic progress. But surprisingly, this girl can pick up her skirt and run. Maybe it was because I had completely lost any hope of brisk acceleration, reading fellow members comments on this forum on "lack of power" but she felt good enough. Not scorching, but definitely not as bad as some have made it out to be IMO

The bike hit a speedo indicated speed of 135, and was ROCK STEADY. No wobble, some vibes but nothing that would prohibit you to take this girl to these numbers. In fact, a 110 - 115 cruise all day long is a reality on this motorcycle. These numbers are with an 86 kilo rider in full gear by the way

I wanted to further explore the "it is underpowered" syndrome, so I looked up the stats of some of the "performance" motorcycles. Here's how the numbers stacked up (source - Motorbeam):

- Yamaha R15 : 0- 100 in 12.5 sec and top speed of 130
- Duke 200 : 0- 100 in 9.4 sec and top speed of around 140
- CBR 250 : 0- 100 in 9 sec and top speed of over 150
- Himalayan : 0- 100 in 10.5 sec (per overdrive) and top speed of 135 (speedo indicated)

Again, its no scorcher ..... but is it anemic? You be the judge of that

I was also left impressed by its handling. Its nimble enough in traffic and leans into corners predictably. The initial steering is a bit slow but once leaned over, it bike holds its line and is unfazed by the irregularities of the roads. Its not Duke 390 nimble but no slouch for a bike its size. The tires also inspired confidence and overall the bike felt planted. The brakes played their part perfectly. The front could do with more bite but the braking is super progressive. You don't get a lot of feedback but you stop without much drama. The rear does lock up quite easily and requires gentle input from the rider

Off road test:

Firstly, I want to get this out of the way - I am a novice level off road rider. So please read the upcoming section bearing the above fact in mind

The track - A KM or so of oval stretch which included a tiny slush patch, a jump and a couple of whoops sections made up of logs buried in the ground. Oh, and sand. Lots and lots of 6 inch deep sand all throughout the track. I mean there wasn't even a singular "packed dirt" kind of section. It was DEEP DEEP sand all across. I rate the difficulty level of this track as "High"

And this is where I think RE goofed up or got carried away a little bit. Almost everyone who was there was a complete noob when it came to riding off road. Do you want to give your customers a scare or want them to enjoy the ride? I could be wrong but I think deep sand is one of the most challenging off road terrains one can ride one. I have heard from even the most experienced riders on how they abhor riding in the sand. It was my first time taking a bike to sand and I can tell you, it can be terrifying. The track should ideally have been hard packed dirt, with a couple of jumps thrown in. Its so much fun getting that rear end loose and sliding the bike around. but when your front end is all over the place, like it is on sand; it can be a hair raising proposition at best

I got on the saddle and entered the track with one thing in mind - don't let go of the gas. A few seconds into the section and the bike was simply all over the place. Having the front end dance around side to side is an "interesting" experience that can make things jump into your throat and keep them lodged for the better part of the rest of your day. I almost ate it and had to get my foot down to keep the bike upright. That's when it hits you - the weight of this thing. For nutter off roading like this, its simply too heavy. I would not want to catch a slide on this thing with my foot. Things will break, I promise you

There were multiple spills all across the track, with one dude eating it even before entering the track (LOL). Did I mention that there was sand everywhere?

I was discussing the off road performance with a veteran off roader buddy of mine, and we were joined by a gentleman who apparently writes for Motorbeam.com. I said - "The front simply did not have any feel" and both (almost) screamed in agreement

Again, I kinda blame REs choice of track here. It was simply too hardcore and would give potential riders a scare than a big grin. I mean, I would not want to buy a motorcycle that spit me out on the ground, would I? Anyhow, I have no doubt that this would do well in a milder off road terrain and will handle gravel, hard pack dirt and even jumps without any fuss

So there's my take on the Himalayan. Apologies for the long post and again, many thanks to Adi for a super fun sunday
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Last edited by Urban_Nomad : 12th April 2016 at 21:13.
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Old 13th April 2016, 10:37   #130
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by maker_of_things View Post
And exhaust header discoloration happens in all vehicles. Don't know why you've kept it in cons.
Not sure which vehicles you are used to where you see exhaust header discoloration as normal.

I have a 1952 Triumph Speed twin and that does not exhibit this discoloration.
I have 2013 Yamaha FZ1 and that too does not exhibit this discoloration.

It maybe normal on older Enfields but for me this being my first Enfield and that too on a bike designed for the 21st century it is not normal and definitely in the cons column.

/sanjay
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Old 13th April 2016, 12:01   #131
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by san9jay View Post
Not sure which vehicles you are used to where you see exhaust header discoloration as normal.

I have a 1952 Triumph Speed twin and that does not exhibit this discoloration.
I have 2013 Yamaha FZ1 and that too does not exhibit this discoloration.

It maybe normal on older Enfields but for me this being my first Enfield and that too on a bike designed for the 21st century it is not normal and definitely in the cons column.

/sanjay
Hey Sanjay, it's a common phenomena you can google for "exhaust header blueing".

Do refer this link too - http://www.fixya.com/motorcycles/t20...ng_gold_colour

And excerpt from the above link:

Quote:
Discoloration on chrome pipes is completely normal and is referred to as "bluing". It's caused by the extreme tempurature of the exhaust as it leaves the engine. Typically it will affect the first 12-inches or so of the exhaust pipe. The problem can be worse if your engine is running too lean a fuel mixture. Since your bike is relitively new the engine might not be completly broken in yet, this will cause it to run a little hotter than it normally would.
Btw, I've got to see your Triumph Speed Twin.
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Old 13th April 2016, 12:25   #132
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Btw, I've got to see your Triumph Speed Twin.
Sent a PM since I dont want to digress from the Himalayan on this thread.

You can also check the complete restoration on this thread.

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/post-w...peed-twin.html (Restoring a Triumph 5T Speed Twin)
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Old 13th April 2016, 13:34   #133
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Sent a PM since I dont want to digress from the Himalayan on this thread.

You can also check the complete restoration on this thread.

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/post-w...peed-twin.html (Restoring a Triumph 5T Speed Twin)
Thanks for that.

I asked for another question in this post (The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread). Can you share the engine oil details?

I would have checked it myself but it doesn't seem like there's a manual on their website yet.
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Old 13th April 2016, 15:02   #134
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

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Originally Posted by Urban_Nomad View Post
I wanted to further explore the "it is underpowered" syndrome, so I looked up the stats of some of the "performance" motorcycles. Here's how the numbers stacked up (source - Motorbeam):

- Yamaha R15 : 0- 100 in 12.5 sec and top speed of 130
- Duke 200 : 0- 100 in 9.4 sec and top speed of around 140
- CBR 250 : 0- 100 in 9 sec and top speed of over 150
- Himalayan : 0- 100 in 10.5 sec (per overdrive) and top speed of 135 (speedo indicated)

Again, its no scorcher ..... but is it anemic? You be the judge of that
Thanks Urban_Nomad, you brought up a good point here. Added few more bikes in the competition and tried to position the himalayan:

- Duke 390 : 0-100 in 5.5 sec and top speed of around 168. (Wiki)
- CBR 250 : 0-100 in 9 sec and top speed of over 150
- Mojo : 0-100 in 9.48 sec and top speed of around 155.
- Duke 200 : 0-100 in 9.4 sec and top speed of around 140.
- Continental GT : 0-100 in 9.5 Sec and Top Speed 140. (RE Claimed)
- Pulsar 200 NS : 0-100 in 9.83 and Top Speed 136. (topspeed)
- Himalayan : 0-100 in 10.5 sec (per overdrive) and top speed of 135 (speedo indicated)
- Classic 500 : 0-100 in 11.58 Sec. (here)
- Yamaha R15 : 0- 100 in 12.5 sec and top speed of 130
- Bullet 500 : 0-100 in 13 Sec and Top Speed 128. (motorbeam)
- Avenger 220 : 0-100 in 13 secs and Top Speed 125. (motorbeam)

Clearly, Duke 390 is way ahead, so I am not comparing it with Himalayan or any other bike in the list. Otherwise, himalayn is not more than 1.5 secs slower than the competing bikes. It doesn't look like bad performer to me. Infact, faster than few elder RE siblings.
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Old 13th April 2016, 16:22   #135
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan Test-Ride Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by san9jay View Post
Not sure which vehicles you are used to where you see exhaust header discoloration as normal.

/sanjay
Mods: Tried finding an appropriate forum to post this, but couldn't and hence posting it here.

The discoloration or coloration is happens due the oxidation of Chromium. Chromium will form a very, very thin layer of oxide naturally and that is what gives the stainless nature. But when heated to temperatures above 300 C, the oxidation layer thickness increases and the diffraction of light gives the coloration. At around 300 it will be yellow and by 600C it will be a deep blue.
The temperature of the exhaust gases, thickness of the pipe and the duration will impact the temperature reached and so the color will vary accordingly
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