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Old 24th June 2016, 14:25   #46
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

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Originally Posted by navpreet318 View Post
I would suggest getting an engine guard from RE or getting one made yourself and then placing the lights and horn etc. on the inside of the guard or in a location where the guard protects due to its angle.

For instance on the GS I have installed the aux lights on both sides of the headlight as the angle made by the engine guards is such that it will never come in contact in case of a lay down or fall.

Those lights are really cheap though. A good deal I must say. How is the throw on road. I would also suggest getting a Morimoto 4300K HID kit for your headlight. They are superb! I have them on both high and low beams on the GS.
Definitely navpreet. A smaller engine guard from RE is on the anvil. I had posted photos of the same on the test ride thread. But it is still to reach my dealership and I have placed a order of these and a few other GT parts which I want installed on my bike.

Yes, the lights are pretty good for the price. These retail @1500 bucks for a pair but due to the supplier also being a close friend, I got them for just 850 bucks a pair. I am a strong believer of the fact that you don't always have to spend big bucks to get quality stuff. Just some hands-on right sourcing and knowledge is required. I designed, soldered and installed the total wiring myself from high quality Fenolex 1.5mm multi-strand wires. Only thing I am not happy with are the clamps which I have since ordered (heavy ones) from AliExpress and also at my dealership. The HID kit will be checked out and then decided. For now I am pretty chuffed about the present setup and it provides me plenty of visibility and flexibility.

Cheers...
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Old 24th June 2016, 15:48   #47
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

Very well written review Friend. Wish you many more happy miles with your new ride! Its' really good to see owner's perspective as one starts using it for a purpose or more and we'll soon know what this purpose built motorcycle got for you!
I'm on the fence and loving this motorcycle more as I continue to read about it. I ride Machismo LB500 and want to understand if I should go for this for the suspension setup, the engine refinement and bare bone function that it offers. Although, my riding is limited, very less in city as commuter and more for long rides. I'm really looking for slightly comfortable ride and not really looking for top speed nos etc. a comfortable cruising speed for Indian roads (sometimes express ways) is all what I'm looking for. Taking a short test ride may not do the justice, I may have to take one on rent for a slightly longer ride and want to get the experience. Your review is going to be very useful at that, let me see how it goes.
Thanks for sharing all the information and keep rolling!
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Old 26th June 2016, 16:14   #48
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

#WorldRideDay - Sunrise Ride - 141kms to Shamli

Sunrise on the Road

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Rock steady @100kmph

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Soon crossed 300kms on the odo

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Does twisties 'much' better than the Harleys. Could easily hold @100 on the twisters

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Soon reached Shamli

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Nothing like a morning cuppa @'Desi Daaru ki Dukaan'... lolz

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Cheers...

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Time to go off-road

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Nice gravely path

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Could easily do 60+ on this narrow path. A more skilled rider could have done better.

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Said hello to some 'Russian' Visitors!

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This road epitomizes this bike

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Soon crossed 400kms. Pushed max till 120kmph in a very short burst. One issue I found today was that at speeds of around 80~90, if I close the throttle fully and then open it again immediately, there was a small lag once or twice during the ride. Typical carburetor fuel-air mixture issue. Need to set the fuel mixture properly on 1st service.

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Some lovely water bodies

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@my farm

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141kms on the trip. 415kms on the odo. Nearly time for 1st service.

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Tell the World that the 'asli' Tiger is here. Grrrrr..... lolz

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At the risk of repeating myself #Himalayan #whatabike

Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer-world-ride-day-26062016_19.jpg

Cheers...

Last edited by dkaile : 26th June 2016 at 16:25.
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Old 26th June 2016, 18:15   #49
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

@dkaile Absolutely loved your expedition kit and your photos! The more I see this bike, the more I am tempted to get it.
How are you finding the braking? And the lack of ABS? I had a small accident of my previous bullet due to rear wheel locking which could have been prevented by ABS and since then I am afraid of getting any bike without ABS.
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Old 26th June 2016, 18:46   #50
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

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Originally Posted by timuseravan View Post
How are you finding the braking? And the lack of ABS?
The brakes are absolutely fantastic and I have had zero issues with them till now. I use 70~80% front braking and rest 20~30% rear braking and that for me has been the mantra of safe braking for decades. I have ridden more than a lac kms on various bikes and have had ABS only recently on my Heritage Softail. Rest, even my Superlow 883cc had no ABS and I rode more than 10k kms on it without issues even though it was a much heavier bike and capable of much higher speeds. I believe that in bikes capable of 200+ speeds, ABS is a must. But for these tourers which can go upto say 120~140kmph, twin disks are all that is needed. Rest, skeptics can always frown on lack of ABS but for me this bike's braking is excellent.

Also the Himalayan is capable of touring whole day @100+kmph with a rock solid plant. The Thunderbird 500 EFI I tested was shaking, rattling and rolling at those speeds. Don't know why some sceptics (for vested interests surely, and to safeguard their expensive purchases) think this engine is lethargic.
-----------------------

Noticed a small oil stain on the head. Will need to get the head bolts tightened @1st service.

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Peace...

Last edited by dkaile : 26th June 2016 at 18:56.
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Old 27th June 2016, 09:25   #51
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Amazing snaps Dkaile.

I have an observation regarding the gearbox. Has anyone else noticed the same? I have driven about 1800kms till date with about 600 kms in the hills. Have noticed major problem of the bike climbing up an incline in first gear. Noticed it in the chock-a-block traffic of kasauli and finally mussorie. The bike seems to stall in first gear on releasing the clutch below 2000. This prevents the bike from crawling up the incline at crawl speeds without slipping the clutch and constantly revving the engine. Very irritating and tiring and am sure its bad for the clutch.

Any observations or advice?
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Old 27th June 2016, 09:39   #52
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

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Originally Posted by ayon View Post
I have an observation regarding the gearbox. Has anyone else noticed the same? I have driven about 1800kms till date with about 600 kms in the hills. Have noticed major problem of the bike climbing up an incline in first gear. Noticed it in the chock-a-block traffic of kasauli and finally mussorie. The bike seems to stall in first gear on releasing the clutch below 2000. This prevents the bike from crawling up the incline at crawl speeds without slipping the clutch and constantly revving the engine. Very irritating and tiring and am sure its bad for the clutch.

Any observations or advice?
That's a strange behavior. Though I have not taken the bike to the hills yet but many others have on our Facebook Himalayan group and this issue I am hearing for the first time. I would advise you to kindly get it checked at the workshop at the earliest. Kindly also get the clutch wire changed to the longer one from Classic 350 immediately which has solved most of the clutch and gearing issues.

Cheers....
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Old 27th June 2016, 19:17   #53
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

1st Service (500kms/1month) @447kms on 27-06-2016

As the bike was nearing the 500km mark, I thought it's a good day to get the 1st service done.

Issues noted -
1. Slight Oil stain after yesterday's ride on top of the cylinder head
2. Tappet noise seemed to have increased
3. Slight gasp in acceleration at speeds of around 80~90 while closing and opening the throttle was also noticed yesterday

The Service Head and the Head Mechanic listened to my issues patiently and as I had already informed the Service Head that I was coming for 1st service in the morning, he was 'armed' and ready with a 4 page 1st Service Checklist for the Himalayan. This was the 1st Himalayan they were servicing. The Head Mechanic (Technician) had also just returned from his 2nd training schedule of the Himalayan and he informed me that the slight gasp in acceleration is also due to tappet adjustment and not due to any fuel mixture issue of the carburetor.

So first and foremost the tappet covers were opened

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A close-up of the tappet

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Both the tappet covers were opened and left open to cool down as the tappets need to be adjusted 'only' in a cold engine

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The engine oil was drained. Notice that not only the drain plug but a larger portion was removed to access the oil strainer

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This is the stainless steel mesh oil strainer that needs cleaning on every oil change. Don't avoid this at any cost.

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The oil filter was also removed and replaced

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Notice the oil strainer goes into this slot

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2 to 2.1L oil is needed for a refill. Oil Grade is HP Racer 4 Plus 15W/50 Grade and costs 350/- per liter

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The Head Bolts were tightened to solve the oil stain issue. They were found to be a bit loose.

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The cylinder block bolts were also tightened

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As were the Timing Cover and Clutch Cover bolts

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This is the timing cover adjustment nut. On flashing light inside, the engine crank has to be rotated to a point where 'T' is marked inside and then the tappets are needed to be adjusted.

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Timing Cover opened to rotate the crank

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In the meanwhile the spark plug was removed. You can see a soot deposit of brownish color on it's tip signifying a perfect combustion for best mileage. It was then cleaned by a automatic machine. Gap was set at 0.7mm.

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The air filter cover was also opened which sits under the left 'Himalayan' side cover

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To reveal the Air Filter Inside

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Quite a good quality one with a large surface area

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It was then cleaned by compressed air

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Now adjusting the tappet was not such a simple job as I had initially thought and it requires this special tool. It is best left to the professionals.

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Both pieces combine to become one tool

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The tappet being finally adjusted with a clearance tool. Inlet tappet clearance to be set between 0.08 - 0.10 mm and exhaust tappet clearance to be set to 0.23 - 0.25 mm and is to be checked in a cold engine only. Both tappet clearances had increased, hence causing extra engine and tappet noise. Both were tightened back to these specs.

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This is the complete Checklist for the 1st Service of the Himalayan which has been specially sent to all dealerships with instructions that they are to be strictly adhered to. All points are self explanatory.

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Fuel filter in fuel tap was also cleaned. Front Forks were also checked for any oil leakage. None found.

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The chain tension was tightened to a 25~30mm play with both tyres on the ground

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Kindly insist that all points in this checklist are properly adhered to during your respective servicing.

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The bike was finally given a nice gentle pressure wash

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Then a proper dry down with compressed air

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The final Bill was just 807 bucks which includes 700 for the oil and 107 for the oil filter. This will be economical bike to maintain.

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Some Himalayan Parts had arrived. So picked up a spare spark plug (a Bosch M10) for just 161 bucks, a couple of frame plastic dust caps that are prone to fall off (8 bucks) and a few original cable ties (6 bucks each)

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The bill of the spares

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The bike has become much smoother after the service. The tappet noise has disappeared and the engine has become smoother and quieter. Overall a satisfying experience and a big Thumbs Up for my Service Dealership for being so pro-active. I am also hearing news that RE is initiating a gradual recall to solve this tappet issue once and for all, by replacing some parts in the engine head. It is short of the required parts and hence are proceeding gradually. It will be a 3 hour process and the head will need to be opened to replace those parts. Let us see when the official information and parts reaches my dealership. For now the bike is running like a dream.

Cheers...

Last edited by dkaile : 27th June 2016 at 19:32.
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Old 29th June 2016, 00:50   #54
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@dkaile Sir your ownership thread is a complete inspiration for me, I hope one day I could start my own ownership thread of my upcoming Snowie Himalayan. To add something further to the discussion can I ask how much efficiency is your H giving as of now. Can you please put up some light on this subject. And did you figured out how the compass works because I couldn't when I took the test ride. Cheers

Last edited by rohitz : 29th June 2016 at 01:17.
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Old 30th June 2016, 08:37   #55
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

Himalayan Puncture Repair Kit

So made this small kit from stuff available off local shops -

Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer-himalayan-puncture-repair-kit.jpg

So this kit contains 2 Small Tyre Levers (40/-) which are sufficient for a motorcycle tyre. 10 small puncture patches patches (10/-), 1 small tyre repair patch (15/-) for small nicks in the tyre, 1 Tube Repair Solution (14/-) and a piece of emery paper (1/-). This should take care of repairing any puncture in the tube if you are stuck in the wilderness.

Also already had this ResQTech Emergency inflator which is built solely for emergency tyre inflation and has saved the day a few times while helping out my mates. It easily works on a motorcycle battery and is small and handy to pack.

Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer-3-resqtech-tyre-inflator.jpg

Quote:
Originally Posted by rohitz View Post
can I ask how much efficiency is your H giving as of now. Can you please put up some light on this subject. And did you figured out how the compass works because I couldn't when I took the test ride.
Efficiency figures are yet to analysed in detail but I think it's somewhere between 25 and 30 for now. The compass works just fine. The arrow on the periphery is 'always' pointing North i.e. towards the Himalayas...lolz, it's a Himalayan after all, while the reading displayed in the centre is the direction your bike is heading. Pretty simple once you get the hang of it and quite apt too.

Cheers...

Last edited by dkaile : 30th June 2016 at 08:39.
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Old 1st July 2016, 13:21   #56
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Hi Dhiraj;

It was pleasure to read your thread. I took delivery of my Snow two days back (a june manufactured bike). Went through PDI and found it to be perfect. Took delivery and enjoying 250KM till date.

There is one thing which is bothering me I thought would counsel with you.

To check on the balance of the bike once I tried to ride it (in controlled situations) without holding the handlebars. I found the bike to have slightly right centered balance. I mean as you leave the handlebars to maintain balance you need to tilt little towards left. Is this normal for Himalayan?

While riding the bike with both hands as normal there is no issue and no pulling on any side even no pain on arm indicating this.

Shared this with the technician and he assured to check this during first service.

Any pointers what could be the case or is this normal to Himalayan. Other owners too please chip in.
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Old 1st July 2016, 14:55   #57
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

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Originally Posted by mrohit17 View Post
There is one thing which is bothering me I thought would counsel with you.

To check on the balance of the bike once I tried to ride it (in controlled situations) without holding the handlebars. I found the bike to have slightly right centered balance. I mean as you leave the handlebars to maintain balance you need to tilt little towards left. Is this normal for Himalayan?
Yes, even I felt the same. Riding it without hands doesn't have a perfectly centered balance. But then it is same with many other big bikes too. I doubt if you can ride a Triumph or a Versys without hands on the handlebars. At least I can't ride my Heritage Softail without hands on the handlebars...lolz. And neither do I want to risk it with a 360kg behemoth.

With both hands on the handlebar the bike feels absolutely centered and balanced and I think that is the more important part. And necessary for safety reasons too. Maybe the higher profile and suspension has something to do with this.

Cheers...

Last edited by dkaile : 1st July 2016 at 14:57.
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Old 7th July 2016, 01:23   #58
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

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Originally Posted by mrohit17 View Post
I mean as you leave the handlebars to maintain balance you need to tilt little towards left. Is this normal for Himalayan?

While riding the bike with both hands as normal there is no issue.....
The spokes of your wheel need "truing". Once done properly, your Himalayan should track straight
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Old 7th July 2016, 02:29   #59
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Himalayan - Comprehensive Review of the 'Desi' Adventure Tourer

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrohit17 View Post
...
To check on the balance of the bike once I tried to ride it (in controlled situations) without holding the handlebars. I found the bike to have slightly right centered balance. I mean as you leave the handlebars to maintain balance you need to tilt little towards left. Is this normal for Himalayan?
...
If the motorcycle doesn't track straight when your hands are not holding the handlebars it is usually caused by an error in the alignment of the rear wheel with the front wheel.

In order to track straight, the rear wheel must be directly in line with the front wheel.
If it is pointed right or left of the front wheel, the motorcycle will tend to turn.

This problem does not mean there is anything wrong with the mechanical parts. In fact, the rear wheel alignment is designed to be adjusted to correct this problem.

Take your motorcycle to a Royal Enfield service shop and they should be able to easily correct the problem.

As the rear wheel will need to be loosened and this will effect the rear chain adjustment, you should take your owners manual with you so the mechanic can see what the rear chain tension should be.
Because the rear suspension travel is greater than the RE Bullet, I suspect the chain looseness will be greater than the 25-30mm looseness used on the Bullet.

Another thing that can cause a motorcycle to pull to side when the hands are not on the handlebars is the road.

If the road you are riding on has a "crown", that is, if the center of the road is higher than the edges, it will cause the motorcycle to turn towards the higher, center of the road even if the rear wheel is properly aligned with the front wheel.

Some roads in areas that have a lot of rainfall have the center area higher than the outer edges to speed up the draining of the water off of the road.

Last edited by ArizonaJim : 7th July 2016 at 02:46.
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Old 7th July 2016, 09:58   #60
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Originally Posted by Urban_Nomad View Post
The spokes of your wheel need "truing". Once done properly, your Himalayan should track straight
Thanks. This is what exactly the Service Technician said. Said he would do it during 1st service.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
If the motorcycle doesn't track straight when your hands are not holding the handlebars it is usually caused by an error in the alignment of the rear wheel with the front wheel.

In order to track straight, the rear wheel must be directly in line with the front wheel.
If it is pointed right or left of the front wheel, the motorcycle will tend to turn.

Another thing that can cause a motorcycle to pull to side when the hands are not on the handlebars is the road.

If the road you are riding on has a "crown", that is, ...........
Thanks. When I received my bike I was facing issues with gear changes (remember its June manufactured, so this should have been already sorted).

Now I even felt chain to be loose, so got it tightened to requirement, and voila gear shifts became much smoother (although still not that great, pondering to change cable to that of CL350). During this time I did get the wheels track aligned and checked using the "Thread Method".

Now after this the right movement (its not road crown issue since bike veers very slightly to right) is reduced and if I sit slightly off center towards left, the bike is balanced.

Will get the spokes job done I believe that is the cause, but as Dhiraj said really this is not really an issue.
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