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Old 8th March 2008, 23:44   #31
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I dont think that is true. You can clear a bike anywhere if it is a TR. Non TR is apparently an issue.

BTW love the two brothers exhaust. I have them on my hornet
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Old 9th March 2008, 00:54   #32
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Originally Posted by DKG View Post
Sorry I meant in 2000 when I returned they were allowing customs clearance in Hyderabad. Now the rules have changed I am told.
Customs clearance for TR can be done at any international cargo clearance facility, as Prabhu said.

However, are you airfreighting your bike down? Shipping would be cheaper, which is probably why your friend got his delivered in Bombay. Sorry, make that Mumbai.
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Old 9th March 2008, 01:53   #33
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Sorry I meant in 2000 when I returned they were allowing customs clearance in Hyderabad. Now the rules have changed I am told. A friend recently imported an R1 from the US, he had to bring it into Bombay. I think they aren't allowing Hyderabad anymore.

Have you ridden the new 600? Its without a doubt one of the sweetest bikes on the market. What a melodious wail that engine has!!!
I havent ridden the new 600 RR but I have ridden the new Hornet which has the same engine and yes, its got that wail that you talk about. I'll post pictures of the bike when I rode it from Bombay to Bangalore.




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I dont think that is true. You can clear a bike anywhere if it is a TR. Non TR is apparently an issue.

BTW love the two brothers exhaust. I have them on my hornet
Prabhu, you have the older versions of the Two Brothers dont you? There's a guy with a Busa with the same ones here. I like the way the new ones look, they are different. I'll post pictures of a friends bike for which I got those pipes in Bangalore.
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Old 10th March 2008, 10:10   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steeroid View Post
Customs clearance for TR can be done at any international cargo clearance facility, as Prabhu said.

However, are you airfreighting your bike down? Shipping would be cheaper, which is probably why your friend got his delivered in Bombay. Sorry, make that Mumbai.
Thanks for clarifying. In my case it was a TR so I had shipped the bike along with my household effects in a container and cleared them all in Hyd.

My friend bought his R1 in the US and imported it directly without TR. I am told 800 cc + you can do that provided some paperwork relating to country of origin/homologation certificate is taken care off. If I understand correctly direct imports without TR need only to be cleared at Mumbai??

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Originally Posted by prabhuav View Post
I dont think that is true. You can clear a bike anywhere if it is a TR. Non TR is apparently an issue.

BTW love the two brothers exhaust. I have them on my hornet
My only concern with aftermarket exhausts is the need to have the ecu remapped, don't like the clean revs being messed up because of the freer flowing exhaust. For the VFR would anyone know what type of ecu remap device suits the Two Brothers?

Last edited by Technocrat : 10th March 2008 at 12:51. Reason: Please Use MultiQuote option
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Old 10th March 2008, 12:53   #35
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Guys I think we are going seriously OT here,there are enough threads to discuss TR & Bike imports regulations. Please keep this thread for Group Riding Dynamics and Safety issues only.
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Old 10th March 2008, 13:01   #36
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Originally Posted by Technocrat View Post
Guys I think we are going seriously OT here,there are enough threads to discuss TR & Bike imports regulations. Please keep this thread for Group Riding Dynamics and Safety issues only.
Coming back to the subject, thought I'd mention that in the interests of safety once a tyre has had a puncture there are limitations on speed. The max permissible is 145 kmph and 24 hours after the puncture being fixed not to exceed 80 kmph. Manufacturers recommend this as a lot of heat is generated within the tyre at high speeds and there is always a risk of an explosion due to the already weakened spot of the puncture.

I thought this merits a mention as I observe a lot of bikers ignoring this. Although a safety margin of 20kmph possibly exists on these recommended limits its advisable to stick to the upper limit of 145 kmph on a bike with a puncture repaired tyre

Last edited by DKG : 10th March 2008 at 13:04.
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Old 10th March 2008, 13:19   #37
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A recent article in a local newspaper mentioned that we must never ignore our "hunches" as we drive.

The brain apparently is contantly processing a great deal of information as you drive/ride, much of it happening at a subconscious level.

The result of this subconscious processing apparently is a gut feeling that we get, could be discomfort with our speed or a need to slow down for some inexplicable reason.

I personally fully subscribe to this. Many a Sunday morning I find myself totally comfortable and in a position to ride faster more comfortably. And on other occasions on the same road I feel uncomfortable at times and invariably slow down.

The article quoted a very interesting incident. Apparently on a F1 track it was noted that one of the drivers suddenly braked well before a bend and slowed down only to discover a major pile up in front of him and was able to avoid crashing in himself. This driver was questioned on why he had slowed down as there was no sign of an accident ahead. Initially the driver said he had no clue, but he simply felt he had too. Analysts researched the situation and found the clue, which the driver agreed was the real reason.

The driver was used to a usual type of crowd reaction as he whizzed past the stands, you know the cheering etc, but somehow he noticed there was a lot less activity as he passed the crowd. Now apparently the crowd had gotten wind of the crash and they were distracted. The driver's brain sensed this odd behaviour, processed it to imply there could be something wrong ahead leading him to suddenly apply the brakes and slow down.

So basically we need to pay attention to our gut feelings as we ride. I know when I observe side lanes I start slowing down as something tells me some joker is about to enter the main road without respect for traffic on the main road. Also after 7am when you pass villages invariably the dogs are up and about and one needs to watch out.
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Old 10th March 2008, 13:23   #38
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Helmet manufacturers also recommend not using helmets that are more than 5 years old. Apparently the composite materials detriorate in structure and the web loses its ability to hold in impact rendering a helmet ineffective in a crash.

I am personally guilty of breaching this on account of the high cost of replacing my Arai, but eventually will when I can afford it.
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Old 10th March 2008, 13:36   #39
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Default Counter Steering: Effective way to steer a Superbike

Anyone riding a superbike long enough will warm up to the technique of counter steering.

This is a seemingly illogical way to effectively steer a superbike, but when you practice it you realise it works brilliantly.

Say you want to turn left. This tech implies you push away on the left handle bar while pulling in the right. You do this as your upper half of the body leans the bike into the left hander. This has something to do with the laws of physics as with the wheel turning slightly to the right on a left hander the weight of the bike is shifted to the left allowing you to turn left. That's how it works.

I can vouch for this as very true and recommend to those who haven't paid attention to this style of riding. Many of you may be doing this unconsciously but don't realise this technique. Its almost like you are dragging the bike into the corner.

Likewise when you are going into a right hander you push away on the right handle bar, pulling the left bar toward you and lean the bike into the right hander.

By the way its more a matter of pressure applied in pull or push rather than yanking on the steering!!

Perfecting this tech makes your turns very secure, allowing you to hold a tighter line rather than running wide.

Try it!!

Last edited by DKG : 10th March 2008 at 13:39.
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Old 24th March 2008, 11:48   #40
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to be really honest....the counter steering still aint that clear...
mind says that when u pull the left side of the handle...or push the right side...the bike shud logically turn to left.....but then this counter steering thing negates it.

the other day i was riding a friend's r6, and while turning right on a round abt. i did notice myself pushing the right grip, but that was mainly bcoz i was scared that i might turn in a bit too sharp. so while turning, the pressure i used to push was changing to correct the turn...is this what counter steering actually is??

** n yes i was leaning on the the right while making the right turn....

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Old 24th March 2008, 16:39   #41
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Excellent inputs there DKG, the experience shows.
A couple of things i'd like to add:
Don't ride like you think its a race, if you are fast whack that throttle and do your thing but being cautious at the same time.
But if you can't keep us with the rest of the pack, its ok, ride at leisure and enjoy the ride.
Enjoying the ride is whats solely important, being up and ahead isn't.
If you're a shade slow than the rest of the pack, then keeping/catching up tends to take up a lot of your presence of mind, which may have you overlook traffic conditions too.
Even if you're a fast rider whose sorta stuck behind a slow mate, don't rush with the overtaking, it could get the noob/slow rider hassled and may not be able to respond to the overtaking proactively.

manson.
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Old 29th September 2008, 09:46   #42
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This is a nice thread I just came across.
Has anyone gone thru these MSF videos?



I'm a proud member of Royal Knight Motrocycle Club where all of us follow these rules. Its not just the fun of riding our bulls on highways, but we also dicuss and compete on obseving these rules during every ride. That doesnt mean you are safe on Indian highways, but this definately helps you a lot in avoiding many dangerous situations that a biker may come across.
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Old 29th September 2008, 09:56   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samyakmodi View Post
the other day i was riding a friend's r6, and while turning right on a round abt. i did notice myself pushing the right grip, but that was mainly bcoz i was scared that i might turn in a bit too sharp. so while turning, the pressure i used to push was changing to correct the turn...is this what counter steering actually is??
Possibly you were counter steering. In principle it has more to do with laws of inertia. Basically a mass moving in a direction will tend to maintain the direction and it will resist change. Lets say you wish to turn right. If you simply turn right the lower half of the bike tracking the ground will turn right, but the upper half will continue to want to go straight. This leads to a "centrifugal" force pushing the bike to the left causing a fall. Which is why we lean into a corner to counter it. Sometimes at speed our leaning doesn't do the job entirely. At this point if while the bike is leaned into a right turn, when you gently push the right handle bar away while pulling on the left bar the bike leans more effectively into the right hander. Leaning your body into the corner as you counter steer is done together. Try it when you ride the next time. Its a very reassuring technique when you do it well. Inspires confidence in turns

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Has anyone gone thru these MSF videos?
Thanks for the lead will check out the video

Last edited by DKG : 29th September 2008 at 09:59.
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Old 18th March 2009, 11:50   #44
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Default Safe Biking

I am attaching an article on "Safety On Two Wheels". This was written by Mr. Suresh Guptan, who was a regular contributor on auto magazines like Autocar India and Car & Bike etc.

This one was in the August 87 issue of Debonair. Despite the "iffy nature" of where it appeared, its very meaningful article and very topical for any age.

Thanks, Regards & Safe Biking
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Safe Biking.pdf (571.3 KB, 292 views)
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Old 4th April 2009, 14:53   #45
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Default Braking Distance

Nice thread on safety-
I have been considering buying a Bull and have been doing some research .
Is it true that Enfield's have very poor braking ability compared to other bikes ?
I mean the newer ones 2005 and later .not the old war horses .

Thanks
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