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Old 10th November 2014, 13:31   #1306
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

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Just look at the thickness. I am solely responsible for this, but never have I faced any braking issues, albeit the sudden loss of braking which I highlighted a couple of posts back (that is not there any more). I never heard any screeching sounds nor any loss of braking at need. Also at time of cleaning though I saw the rings forming on the dick plate, I do not know why I ignored them. Service technician advises that disc ring is all good, but the pads should have been replaced long back. Now how can I infer that the pads are at the end of life when the braking is just as adequate as it should be. Please advise. I sincerely do not wish to make the same blunder the next time.
One of the brake pad appears worn out (inner or outer you may want to clarify), typically it should be at-least 2mms, i guess original ones will be close to 4mms in thickness. Also, the worn out brake pad shows un-evenness in its thickness, which needs to be seriously looked into, means it hasn't worn out evenly, as it normally should.

Ask the service guys to look at the calliper movement, lubrication and pins holding them. Its better to check your pads every 6-8 months timeframe, though they are theoretically supposed to last longer. In Indian conditions, its very important that this aspect be checked thoroughly.
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Old 10th November 2014, 13:49   #1307
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BTW, the studs were tightened using the same procedure Jim suggested?
The tap with the hammer worked perfect for the lower stud. The upper stud located in a recess between the engine fins and the exhaust pipe itself was hard to reach. In the end I used a broad flat screw driver wedged between the cylinder fins and the stud and levered it straight. The main problem during the work was that with the engine in the frame with that crash guard and all, you don't have room for anything. Even the tap with the hammer has to be careful since a slip could divert the blow to the cylinder fins or the exhaust pipe.
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Hello all,

We can observe that the fins are distorted behind the fence. Now I had observed this at the time of the filter cleaning at home too, but had no clear answer to the cause for it. I understand that its no worry though. One possible thought which came to my mind was because of the air being sucked in, the fins got distorted, but when I asked the same to the service technician, their response was quite surprising. "If you intend to replace, we will, but the filter is good to go. Why this unusual bending of the fins : Its supposed to be so" Obviously it did not answer anything and so here is my query. Why do these fins in the airfilter bend in such distorted fashion? Also is there anything to inference looking at the bent fins or the used air filter?
The bend in the paper crease in the air filter is normal. It is caused by the method by which the air filter is mounted in its position by the metallic disk. Your new air filter will also look the same if you inspect it. Don't resent the decision to replace the air filter as it is better to reduce the interval of air filter replacement in the light of the dusty conditions in our country.

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These spark plugs are cleaned just with air blow and waste clothes. Gaps are not adjusted. What I observed was that gaps have increased (normal I understand as I compared with the new ones). What else to be inferred with regards to the running engine looking at this year old spark plugs? I am not facing any issues at this moment but would like to know if looking at a used spark plug may infer something worth looking into for the future.
The spark plug gaps are on the higher side and may explain your mis fires. To read a spark plug , you have to do a plug chop at the desired throttle position and then read it without cleaning it and you will have to post photographs with the central insulator and electrode visible By seeing the sediments on the surface of your secondary plug, I feel that the drain path which drains water from the spark plug pit on the right side of the cylinder head is plugged.

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Originally Posted by Majumdarda View Post
Just look at the thickness. I am solely responsible for this, but never have I faced any braking issues, albeit the sudden loss of braking which I highlighted a couple of posts back (that is not there any more). I never heard any screeching sounds nor any loss of braking at need. Also at time of cleaning though I saw the rings forming on the dick plate, I do not know why I ignored them. Service technician advises that disc ring is all good, but the pads should have been replaced long back. Now how can I infer that the pads are at the end of life when the braking is just as adequate as it should be. Please advise. I sincerely do not wish to make the same blunder the next time.
The first signs of worn brake pads would be more travel in the brake lever and a slightly lower level in the bake fluid reservoir. It is because as the brake pads thins out, the pistons move out more to engage the brake pads which in turn slightly increases the inner volume of the brake assembly thereby displaying a lowered brake fluid level.
regards adrian

Last edited by adrian : 10th November 2014 at 13:56.
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Old 11th November 2014, 01:38   #1308
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

IMO, the slightly bent folds on the air filter paper are typical of many modern paper filter element filters.
The bending is due to the pressures the injection dies place on the filter element as it closes and injects the rubber-like compounds that form the ends. This assures that both ends of the paper element are fully embedded in the compound.
It's nothing to worry about.

The spark plugs look fine. The light ash gray coating on the insulator is typical of the deposits left by modern petrol.
The slight discoloration on one side of the center insulator is due to the swirl of the air/fuel mixture during the compression and ignition cycles.

Had the center insulator been black or if it had a shiny smooth glass-like appearance it would indicate there was a air/fuel mixture problem. As your sparkplugs don't show either of these conditions, everything is fine.

You certainly got your money out of those brake pads!
Another 500 km and they might have caused some damage to the disk.

Because there is still some brake pad material and no sign of the disk hitting the steel backing plate, your disk should be fine without doing anything to it.
When I say that, I mean there should be no reason to remove it and remachine the faces.
A slightly worn area on the disk which is below the levels of the outer and inner areas of the disk (which the pads never touch) is to be expected.

The only thing the disk would need when the new brake pads are installed is to have the wear surfaces on both sides roughed up a bit with some sandpaper. The light scoring created by the sandpaper will help to break in the new pads so they will fully conform with the disk.

Hopefully, a very light coating of high temperature grease was applied to the pins that guide the new brake pads and all of the exposed surfaces on the calipers and the pad springs were fully cleaned. If this isn't done, sometimes the brake will squeal when it is applied.

Happy riding.
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Old 11th November 2014, 12:35   #1309
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

Thank you all for your suggestions and I am happy to know that all is well. Gives immense pleasure.
Now I have a very kiddish query and probably I should be searching the entire section of REQ to find an answer, but the lazy I am forces me to put the query right here.

Royal Enfield Queries-img_20141111_120115149_hdr001.jpg

What is Nut 1 and 2 called as? I am used to making slight adjustments with the Nut 2 with my Pulsar, but had never touched the Nut 1.

One nutty issue I face at times is the occasional idling / knocking. So the technician (not RE branded) had told me to adjust these two nuts in delta rotations till I get the correct setting. He had made the setting, but had told me that the best setting can be done on a cold engine. So just a few minutes back, I went to the parking and did some delta adjustments with both the nuts. Now I have a very smooth idling and presumably no knocking at times.

Yes I can definitely take Amun-Ra to him, but the fact that he never takes money for this work, pushed me to do it on my own.

Now what I understand is probably I have come to a correct setting, but its after numerous starts and one - two small rides. Do we have some rule of thumb available or delta rotations is the only way?

Please advise and sorry for probably asking a very kiddish question.
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Old 11th November 2014, 13:06   #1310
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Originally Posted by Majumdarda View Post
T


What is Nut 1 and 2 called as? I am used to making slight adjustments with the Nut 2 with my Pulsar, but had never touched the Nut 1.

He had made the setting, but had told me that the best setting can be done on a cold engine. So just a few minutes back, I went to the parking and did some delta adjustments with both the nuts. Now I have a very smooth idling and presumably no knocking at times.
Screw you have marked 2 is the idle adjuster and screw 1 is the fuel mixture screw. Contrary to what your mechanic has said, these screws have to be adjusted with engine at optimal temperature. If you adjust these screws with the engine cold, the air fuel ratio will get richer once the engine gets hot.
To make the adjustment, with the engine warm take the rpm to around 1300 with the idle adjustment screw. Turn your fuel screw counter clock wise till it seats (do not use force- just slightly seat it otherwise the screw made of brass will break off) The engine will stumble and even turn off at this point. Now turn the fuel screw out (Clockwise) 1/8 turns at a time giving a couple of seconds for the engine to adjust. You will see the engine rpm constantly rise and at one point it becomes constant. Further turning of the fuel screw will not cause the rpm to rise. Stop turning the screw at the point where the rpm is at the highest and the exhaust note is sharp and snappy. Adjust the idle between 800 and 1100 (to your liking) and you are done. The fuel screw setting will be prescribed in the workshop manual, but believe me it will be on the leaner side.
Adding to the above
The earlier CI bullets which had the pulse air valve had one more screw for tuning. Since you have the pulse air valve in your B500, it would be better if you refer to a wall chart or exploded view of the carburetor before attempting to tweak it.
regards adrian

Last edited by adrian : 11th November 2014 at 13:34.
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Old 11th November 2014, 13:53   #1311
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Turn your fuel screw counter clock wise till it seats (do not use force- just slightly seat it otherwise the screw made of brass will break off) The engine will stumble and even turn off at this point. Now turn the fuel screw out (Clockwise) 1/8 turns at a time giving a couple of seconds for the engine to adjust. You will see the engine rpm constantly rise and at one point it becomes constant. Further turning of the fuel screw will not cause the rpm to rise.
regards adrian
Sorry for the error I have made while typing, usually the fuel screw seats while turning clock wise and comes loose when turned counter clockwise. The fuel screw in my machine is on the left side, so got confused interpreting the direction of turn with reference to the machine So I will just say that screwing out causes a rich condition and screwing in leans out the AFR. Here is the parts manual for your B 500
http://www.iamenfielder.com/PDF/BULL...dt-05.2013.pdf
It contains the exploded view of the ucd 33 carburetor and after looking at it I have this feeling that you have turned the screw way out to the point it is about to fall out.
regards adrian

Last edited by adrian : 11th November 2014 at 14:10.
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Old 12th November 2014, 14:36   #1312
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...marked 2 is the idle adjuster and screw 1 is the fuel mixture screw... these screws have to be adjusted with engine at optimal temperature.
To make the adjustment, with the engine warm take the rpm to around 1300 with the idle adjustment screw. Turn your fuel screw counter clock wise till it seats (do not use force- just slightly seat it otherwise the screw made of brass will break off) The engine will stumble and even turn off at this point. Now turn the fuel screw out 1/8 turns at a time giving a couple of seconds for the engine to adjust. You will see the engine rpm constantly rise and at one point it becomes constant. Further turning of the fuel screw will not cause the rpm to rise. Stop turning the screw at the point where the rpm is at the highest and the exhaust note is sharp and snappy. Adjust the idle between 800 and 1100 (to your liking) and you are done...
A very clean explanation for a novice like me. I understand that the experience you guys have on these adjustments have come up with endless tweaking. But its such fun, a small minute twist and the engine sounds so very different. WOW.

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Sorry for the error I have made while typing, usually the fuel screw seats while turning clock wise and comes loose when turned counter clockwise. The fuel screw in my machine is on the left side, so got confused interpreting the direction of turn with reference to the machine So I will just say that screwing out causes a rich condition and screwing in leans out the AFR. Here is the parts manual for your B 500
http://www.iamenfielder.com/PDF/BULL...dt-05.2013.pdf
It contains the exploded view of the ucd 33 carburetor and after looking at it I have this feeling that you have turned the screw way out to the point it is about to fall out.
regards adrian
I understood the rotation part by reading your first post only, but its definitely good if somebody wants. Your explanation is very simple to understand and helps a lot. And hey, the brass screw will not fall off. I already have the spare parts manual with me, so in case it does, I know it has to be a certain 570846/A that I need to be looking for.

Thank you again Adrian

Kind regards,
Bikramjit.

Last edited by Majumdarda : 12th November 2014 at 14:38.
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Old 12th November 2014, 19:41   #1313
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I understand that the experience you guys have on these adjustments have come up with endless tweaking.
You can say that again. Adjusting fuel screw in motorcycles with an rpm meter is easy where as to tune it by the ear is a real challenge. It takes practice and with each go you learn something new.
The first step to doing DIY on your motorcycle is to get past that fear that you are going to destroy it. You have get past that and entered the world of DIY. So congratulations
Many people fear that adjusting the fuel screw in the carburetor will destroy the engine. The fact is that you are adjusting the air fuel ratio of the motorcycle during the idle and all it would do if it is wrongly adjusted is that it will run like crap and give you feed backs (through engine sound and through throttle responses) on the condition (rich or lean) the engine is running in. If you disregard these signs and continue to ride on, it may bring harm to your engine. There are several websites that offers conditions displayed by thumpers during rich and lean running conditions. There is an old motorcycle saying "Practice wrenching on your own motorcycle"

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Originally Posted by Majumdarda View Post
And hey, the brass screw will not fall off. I already have the spare parts manual with me, so in case it does, I know it has to be a certain 570846/A that I need to be looking for
Actually why I said it was that I keep my motorcycle's fuel screw out 6 full turns , 2 full turns more than the company prescribed maximum setting and still the brass screw stays inside its cavity (The pilot jet size of UCE 350 is 12.5). The pilot jet size of Bullet 500 is 15 and by the way the pilot jet is jutting out in the picture you posted, it might be around 7 -8 full turns out which I think will be very rich. So please count the number of full turns from the seated positions and co relate with the feed back given to you by your motorcycle.
regards adrian

Last edited by adrian : 12th November 2014 at 19:43.
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Old 14th November 2014, 00:48   #1314
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

Tyre Tube

Company specifications are as follows:-

Front : 90/90 - 19"
Rear : 120/80 - 18"

Now in past I know I have been informed that 120/80 is not readily available and seems the same has not changed even after an year. The option that I have is 100/90 - 18". Please advise will this be a comfortable fit for the rear wheels?

Also how many manufacturers are there for tubes? I was only aware of Mypol but the shops over here are coming of names, unheard of. I am looking for tubes which will be good and within the budget (Say 300 max). Please suggest good options.
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Old 14th November 2014, 08:35   #1315
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

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Tyre Tube

Company specifications are as follows:-

Front : 90/90 - 19"
Rear : 120/80 - 18"

Now in past I know I have been informed that 120/80 is not readily available and seems the same has not changed even after an year. The option that I have is 100/90 - 18". Please advise will this be a comfortable fit for the rear wheels?

Also how many manufacturers are there for tubes? I was only aware of Mypol but the shops over here are coming of names, unheard of. I am looking for tubes which will be good and within the budget (Say 300 max). Please suggest good options.
There are many brands in the 18 size tires, unlike 19.
Going for a 100/90 in the rear will not only make the bike look weird., the ride will become uncomfortable as well. The only advantage would be, you gain some extra speed.

I would suggest trying a different brand in the 120 size.
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Old 14th November 2014, 10:01   #1316
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There are many brands in the 18 size tires, unlike 19.
Going for a 100/90 in the rear will not only make the bike look weird., the ride will become uncomfortable as well. The only advantage would be, you gain some extra speed.

I would suggest trying a different brand in the 120 size.
I have enquired for 120/80 in numerous shops and all have the same response. It just seems not at all available. Is it available at your place?
What other options do I have other than 120/80, as you are saying 100/90 is not good?
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Old 14th November 2014, 10:42   #1317
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

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I have enquired for 120/80 in numerous shops and all have the same response. It just seems not at all available. Is it available at your place?
What other options do I have other than 120/80, as you are saying 100/90 is not good?
Hi,

Check if this will be of any help.

http://www.tyreonwheels.com/bike/tyr...act/vs/13/Pune

http://www.snapdeal.com/search?keywo...D=&dealDetail=

The Ceat Vertigo 120/80-18 is a proven tyre for our conditions. Apart from this you can also check if Michellin Sirac is available. Its hard to get hold of that these days but is an awesome one.

Last edited by man_of_steel : 14th November 2014 at 10:43.
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Old 14th November 2014, 17:50   #1318
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...
The Ceat Vertigo 120/80-18 is a proven tyre for our conditions. Apart from this you can also check if Michellin Sirac is available. Its hard to get hold of that these days but is an awesome one.
Hi man_of_steel,
I am sorry but I think I have not been able to clearly put forward my requirement. The tires are all fine. Its the tube I am looking for.
The tire sizes are as follows:-
Front : 90/90 - 19"
Rear : 120/80 - 18"
I am told that tube of 120/80 in 18 inches is not available and the only tube option I have is 100/90 in 18".
I hope now I am able to clearly put forward my query. Thank you again.
Please advise.
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Old 16th November 2014, 13:03   #1319
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Default Re: Royal Enfield Queries

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.... The tires are all fine. Its the tube I am looking for.
..
Rear : 120/80 - 18"
Aah, the tube! If its the 120-18 tube you are looking for, just forget about it! I have searched entire Bangalore and some parts on Kerala for a tube for Classic and Thunderbird. Its nowhere available. All my friends who has the 120-18s are running on 100-18 tubes!

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Old 21st November 2014, 14:40   #1320
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Some nostalgia , although not too old.

This is the RE catalog from 2002 and the models available back then.

I am not sure Lightening 535 was available because TB350 was launched by then and had its own brochure .

2002 is when the long mufflers and the circular air filter first made an appearance. It is the same year when RE decided to mention 'Royal Enfield' on their bikes instead of just 'Enfield'.


Mods- please delete or move to appropriate thread if required,
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