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Old 10th May 2013, 11:08   #3091
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

80-100 is the comfort and reliability cruising speed range for any Bullet.

Whether it is cast iron or lean burn or unit construction.

Whether it is 350 or 500.

And no Bullet likes being ridden in the day time.

If wou want to tour on a Bullet, you should travel like the camel riding bedouin do in the Sahara.

Find a shady place and sleep during the day, and ride through the night.
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Old 10th May 2013, 11:23   #3092
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
80-100 is the comfort and reliability cruising speed range for any Bullet.

Whether it is cast iron or lean burn or unit construction.

Whether it is 350 or 500.

And no Bullet likes being ridden in the day time.

If wou want to tour on a Bullet, you should travel like the camel riding bedouin do in the Sahara.

Find a shady place and sleep during the day, and ride through the night.
lol.. good anology doc. What is your take on this doc? 120kms constant running on NH3, daytime actually 11am till 1.30pm (hottest part), in April, the TB doing a constant indicated 110-120kmph with pillion, no breaks, no power loss, no heating. Reached home, parked, then took it out in the evening again, the bike and me fresh as ever.
Has the bullet changed for good?
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Old 10th May 2013, 11:30   #3093
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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As for carburetor vs fuel injection, yes, the carburetor is easier to modify to achieve good performance. This "easier" isn't easy though.
A typical carburetor has several fuel control jets in it and each of these has several different sizes to choose from. The fuel metering rod also comes in several different sizes. All of this adds up to a number of combinations that may work very poorly (or not at all) to the ideal combination that gives the performance the builder is after.
true. Carbs can be a pain with so many permutations for fuel metering and demands some experience in getting the settings right. One cant travel with a carb expert all the time, and running the bull on a well tuned carb would require the rider to have some knowledge, experience of the same to tweak around wrt the ride style. At the sametime, once the rider knows his carb well, the tweaking possibilities are numerous.

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Even after finding the best combination, it is usually only suitable for the elevation it was tested at. As most of you know, changing elevation by 1200 meters will cause the carburetor to need to be readjusted.
The CV carbs do a fair job wrt to altitude, but the throttle controlled flat or round slide carbs are more prone to altitude issues.

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The Royal Enfields fuel injection on the other hand cannot be adjusted without spending large sums of money and even then the final result may not provide much (if any) real improvement over the stock ECU settings.
With the sensors in the new UCE fuel injected engine a change of altitude will be automatically compensated for.
EFI is no doubt superior to carb as a hassle free technology, but taking about EFI on indian UCE500, not sure if the missing lembda would be able to provide correct information to ECU for altitude compensation.
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Old 10th May 2013, 11:44   #3094
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
lol.. good anology doc. What is your take on this doc? 120kms constant running on NH3, daytime actually 11am till 1.30pm (hottest part), in April, the TB doing a constant indicated 110-120kmph with pillion, no breaks, no power loss, no heating. Reached home, parked, then took it out in the evening again, the bike and me fresh as ever.
Has the bullet changed for good?
Running a Bullet hot (110-120) for 2 hours is a lot different to your earlier claim of pulling 120-130 ''all day."

That said, your Bullet is very new.

All new Bullets have a lot of juice in them.

But as old time Bulleteers have learned and will tell you, that juice does not come from a perpetual well of plenty.

It is a finite resource there to be used at the pace you desire.

To use (and abuse) over 5 years, or to conserve over 20.

But over time your Bullet will go downhill.

And when it does, it will be a steep slope.

And then you will realise that it becomes an exercise in diminishing returns far more in the UCEs when compared to the LBs, which in turn suffer when compared to the iron Standards.

Simplicity and time tested design and ease and robustness of re-build come to the fore then.

Big time. And I speak from experience here.

So lets talk after another 10 years and around 150,000 kms probably (if you are as blessed and lucky - a big IF).

And then tell me whether I was right.

P.S. NH3?

Last edited by ebonho : 10th May 2013 at 11:49.
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Old 10th May 2013, 11:51   #3095
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Big time. And I speak from experience here.

So lets talk after another 10 years and around 150,000 kms probably (if you are as blessed and lucky - a big IF).

And then tell me whether I was right.
Hyperbole aside, what I gather from your experience is: The bullet if ridden at higher speeds constantly, tends to degrade in performance and power. Idea is to keep it running for longer in a lower power setting. If the bike is kept running at around 80-90kmph, then should the mechanical bits last long, or by the virtue of being bullets they are bound to degrade over time no matter what.
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Old 10th May 2013, 11:58   #3096
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Hyperbole aside, what I gather from your experience is: The bullet if ridden at higher speeds constantly, tends to degrade in performance and power. Idea is to keep it running for longer in a lower power setting. If the bike is kept running at around 80-90kmph, then should the mechanical bits last long, or by the virtue of being bullets they are bound to degrade over time no matter what.
The fact that you have bought a 500 means you are not going to be babying the bike.

Unlike foreigners who have access to so many modern fast machines, up until very recently for power hungry Indian riders, the 500 was a much needed power and go-fast fix. For us its a "big" bike. For foreigners it is a small, quaint, modern retro, harking back to simpler more innocent times, and something to be coddled and enjoyed for what it is, rather than giving your right wrist a tonic clonic workout every opportunity you get.

So yes, if you keep the bike at 80-90 and ride it peacefully, assuming its the "perfect" piece, with every part within design parameter specs, with no material or manufacturing bad code, your Bullet will last longer than if you keep gunning it.

But then what are you saving it for? And what did you buy it for if you are never going to gun it?

Its the eternal existential conundrum of life.

Live life to the fullest and go out in a blaze of glory all guns blazing, or live life like a pauper and die unfulfilled at 110 of old age.

P.S. That's another happy add-on of Bulleteering. You become deeply spiritual and philosophical ...... (as you wait for parts to arrive from Chennai)

Last edited by ebonho : 10th May 2013 at 12:01.
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Old 10th May 2013, 12:03   #3097
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
The fact that you have bought a 500 means you are not going to be babying the bike.

Unlike foreigners who have access to so many modern fast machines, up until very recently for power hungry Indian riders, the 500 was a much needed power and go-fast fix. For us its a "big" bike. For foreigners it is a small, quaint, modern retro, harking back to simpler more innocent times, and something to be coddled and enjoyed for what it is, rather than giving your right wrist a tonic clonic workout every opportunity you get.

So yes, if you keep the bike at 80-90 and ride it peacefully, assuming its the "perfect" piece, with every part within design parameter specs, with no material or manufacturing bad code, your Bullet will last longer than if you keep gunning it.

But then what are you saving it for? And what did you buy it for if you are never going to gun it?

Its the eternal existential conundrum of life.

Live life to the fullest and go out in a blaze of glory all guns blazing, or live life like a pauper and die unfulfilled at 110 of old age.
Quite true! I agree with your philosophy regarding usage of bikes. However I am a little concerned regarding horror stories narrated by bulletiers themselves, involving pistons flying out of blocks, bike seizing up at 100kmph and bits breaking off and flying away, hundreds of kms from home etc etc.
I know when I rev my bike, that it feels and sounds tight, however these little fears keep popping up, may be there are too many horror stories floating around.
Anyways that aside, as long as I am in my warranty period, and bike feels and sounds good, I would use it to its maximum potential. Rest I shall see when and as it occurs. Happy biking to all.
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Old 10th May 2013, 12:04   #3098
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

I agree with Akshay on the comfort zone of C-500 as we both own the same bike. I am also most comfortable when the bike is between 90kmph-100kmph

Anything above 100kmph needs me to get into tactics like bending down, holding the handle with even firmer grip, brace myself for something uneventful etc

Btw, I still wonder how you guys touch 130kmph and above?

I have not been able to go beyond 115kmph till date as the wind,noise that seeps through the helmet is so noisy, it scares the bejesus out of me and i dont dare push the bike beyond this point

Don't you guys feel the wind, noise of the engine alarmingly high at high speed? Would be curious to your experiences

Update

Thanks to Wanderers Moderator and close pal who arranged for the oldest bullet mechanic in Hyderabad to visit my home yesterday. As mentioned afore, I tried the following

1. Horn and lights were working flawlessly so mechanic immediately deciphered its a weak battery

2. Removed the RD ECU and re-fitted the stock ECU. The bike roared to life in a few kicks

3. After that I told him the battery lost charge within a day of full charge, he said we need to replace

4. Apparently,C-500's battery is monopolized by EXIDE. It comes with 12V and 14amps and there are 2 versions. 6 month warranty for Rs.17xx and 18 months warranty for Rs.2700

I chose the latter and mechanic will get a new battery and fix it sometime today

Summary : My stock battery lasted for 16 months and 6100kms. Hope the new battery lasts for similar or extended period. And, this is my first major expense on the Bullet since I bought it

Last edited by mobike008 : 12th May 2013 at 09:25. Reason: corrected the odo reading
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Old 16th May 2013, 08:02   #3099
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

Need Help...

My C5 has developed cracks in the tube which is connected to the fuel tank and petrol is dropping as soon as I start the ignition. Service center is 6 KMs away from my place.

Should I seal the tube with the tape and take it to service center or get the tube from service center and try to replace it myself. I believe it would at least require removal of the rider seat.

Has anyone faced this issue?

Thanks in advance.

Rajan
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Old 16th May 2013, 10:13   #3100
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Originally Posted by rajanvash View Post
Need Help...

My C5 has developed cracks in the tube which is connected to the fuel tank and petrol is dropping as soon as I start the ignition. Service center is 6 KMs away from my place.

Should I seal the tube with the tape and take it to service center or get the tube from service center and try to replace it myself. I believe it would at least require removal of the rider seat.

Has anyone faced this issue?

Thanks in advance.

Rajan
Hi, with 294 KPa fuel pressure involved in the process, it would be better if you get the work done at the service center.
Regards adrian

Last edited by adrian : 16th May 2013 at 10:18.
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Old 16th May 2013, 10:25   #3101
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

You didn't say if your C5 was fuel injected but I'll assume it is.

On several occasions I found the hose clamp that holds the fuel line to the fuel pump outlet to be loose.

It seems the compression of the clamp causes the rubber hose to compress and loose its tightness on the pump outlet.

To remedy the problem I used a slotted screw driver to carefully tighten the small screw on the clamp. It took perhaps 1/2 of a full turn to tighten.

Over the course of a year I had to do this twice. After the second tightening I had no more problems with it.

I must point out that the fuel connection coming out of the fuel pump in the fuel tank is made of plastic. Pushing hard against it while tightening the clamp screw or over-tightening the screw can cause it to break and the only way of replacing it is to buy a new fuel pump. They are very expensive. Just turn the clamp screw enough to stop the leakage.

Again, speaking only of the fuel injected engines, if tightening the hose clamp doesn't stop the leak or if the leak is in the body of the hose, replacing it is the only answer.

This involves getting a fuel hose of the correct size.
Just as important, the hose must be made for a high pressure fuel injection system. Just any old rubber hose will not do.
These hoses are commonly used on most fuel injected automobiles so a Auto Supply will have them.

To replace the hose requires removal of the fuel tank to gain access to the fuel injector.
The hose will be a very tight fit on the fuel injector and even after loosening the clamp there it probably won't pull off easily.
Some people have found that removing the hose from the fuel injector requires slitting it along its length in the area where it attaches to the fuel injector.
Once removed, apply just a touch of motor oil to the inside of the new hose and it should slip onto the fuel injector fairly easily. (Don't forget to slip the clamp onto the hose before installing it.

The routing for the hose back to the fuel pump isn't too important as long as it doesn't have any kinks in it and it doesn't interfere with the area where the fuel tank attaches to the frame.

Those bolts that hold the fuel tank to the frame must be tightened very tight. If they aren't, the vibration of the bike will soon cause them to become loose.
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Old 16th May 2013, 10:56   #3102
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

My ds500 got a strange problem today.I self started it but it was not working so I kick started it.When the bike started there was a stange noise of some kind of motor running and the bike didnt turned off when I used the key and switch to turn off so I removed the fuses but the bike only stopped after removing relay but now the bike is dead.No ignition light or anything..any ideas what is wrong with it..need help..
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Old 16th May 2013, 12:51   #3103
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
2. Removed the RD ECU and re-fitted the stock ECU. The bike roared to life in a few kicks
Does that mean that RD ECU is out and stock ECU is in? or was it swapped just to narrow down on the issue?

Also, can you please share the contact details of the mechanic?

Last edited by xydon : 16th May 2013 at 12:52.
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Old 16th May 2013, 12:57   #3104
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Default Re: The Royal Enfield 500 Classic thread!

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Does that mean that RD ECU is out and stock ECU is in? or was it swapped just to narrow down on the issue?Also, can you please share the contact details of the mechanic?
It was removed to just narrow down the problem. Once the new battery was installed, the RD ECU went back in. Now the bike is back to its normal self except for a small issue

There is a brand new sound that is emanating from the engine. There is a faint "jingle jingle" type of noise. As if the chain is loose. Anyone can pin point what could be this sound? It wasnt there before.

Otherwise, the bike is running now fine

Will share the mechanic info offline as he is a life saviour who comes to home in such stranded situations and helps you out.

Home visit charge is Rs.250
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Old 16th May 2013, 13:50   #3105
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Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
The new Royal Enfield UCE's on the other hand is proving to have corrected these faults and although it is limited to about 130 kmph (82 mph), it will run at a constant speed (where practical) of 112 kmph (70 mph) for hours on end without overheating or overstressing its engine parts.
I can surely vouch for that. Here in Oman our weekend trips often involve several hours on riding at constant speeds in the range of 100-120 Kmph and my CL500 does it with ease without overheating. I find 100kmph to be a very comfortable cruising speed.

Can someone throw some light on how a lambda sensor compensates for changes in altitude ?

Last edited by mobike008 : 16th May 2013 at 15:07. Reason: back to back posts. Please refrain
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