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Old 31st March 2010, 09:45   #31
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Originally Posted by Rollin' Thunda View Post
Modern disc brakes give much more powerful de-acceleration than what you will get through engine braking.

The engine is capable of braking the motorcycle a bit when you stay off the throttle, but it also resists *more* deceleration. And because you should brake much harder than the engine brake, you pull the clutch."
I get you point now.

Whatever I told before was from my personal experience with my old school bike Yamaha RXZ (which does not have disk brakes).

For bikes with disk brakes, your approach seems better.

Rohan
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Old 31st March 2010, 10:28   #32
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I feel engine braking is effective only when used correctly. The downshift has to correspond to the max speed of that particular gear. Its most effective when you almost redline on every gear while downshifting. This has to correspond with effective and controlled use of the front and rear brakes(disc brakes or not). In emergency braking you have to sometimes downshift multiple gears like from 5th to 3rd. If you are comfortable with clutchless gearshifting then this becomes much easier, since you are completely in sync with your engine(as in, you understand your engine response to high revs under extreme engine braking). The need for using the clutch while engine braking is either negligible or completely unnecessary. In the wet you also have to factor in loss of traction and modulate accordingly. It all comes with repeated practice and I believe that new riders should start practicing using front brakes from day 1, albeit with caution.

Successful precise braking by using engine braking and brakes to their maximum combined effect comes with much practice and a total understanding of your bikes behaviour.

Last edited by jaysmokesleaves : 31st March 2010 at 10:32.
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Old 31st March 2010, 18:48   #33
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Default Tip 9. Riding in moderate/heavy traffic:

Never Hurry: Your speed should be in tune with the traffic on the road, not fast nor slow.

Brake early and gradually (to avoid someone rear-ending you!). Do not make sudden moves. Check the RVMs and be very aware of the vehicles nearby and avoid coming in their way.

While moving in traffic, don't go close to other vehicles or allow them to come close to you: maintain a cocoon of empty space around yourself keeping several meters from vehicles ahead of and behind you, and 2 meters free on left/right. To make space ahead of you, just slow down a bit. If a vehicle is crowding close to you from behind, allow it to overtake.

Do not ride directly behind another vehicle,
but slightly to one side to leave you an "escape route" in case it brakes suddenly. When riding behind buses and other large vehicles, leave even more space in between (as you will not be able to swerve past them if they stop suddenly).

Do not ride beside another vehicle:
either go ahead, or drop back to allow it to go ahead, by at least several meters.

When coming to a stop, check the RVMs and remain in first gear (i.e., do not go to neutral), in case you need to move suddenly to avoid a rear-end collision. When moving again after traffic slow-downs or stops, accelerate slowly to allow some space to be created between yourself and the vehicle ahead.
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Old 1st April 2010, 17:53   #34
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Default Tip 10: Intersections

Intersections are very dangerous places: Even with a green light (or at a seemingly empty non-traffic-light intersection) reduce speed and shift gears down as you approach, scan all directions and proceed cautiously.

Check the RVMs and reduce speed gradually, to avoid getting rear-ended.

Watch out for vehicles making sudden lane changes,
to turn right or left, before the intersection. If turning yourself, use your indicators and make your own lane changes early, much ahead of the intersection.

At a non-traffic-light intersection, if there is any cross-traffic at all, come to a stop or near-stop before proceeding. When coming to a stop, remain in first gear. Accelerate slowly after stopping.

After your light turns green, enter the intersection with a few seconds delay
, to avoid being hit by late-coming cross traffic jumping the red-light.

Watch out specially for vehicles turning right, and make you own right turns with extreme caution.
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Old 2nd April 2010, 19:42   #35
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Default Tip 11. Passing pedestrians, cyclists, stopped/parked vehicles

When traveling at speed [>20kmph], keep at least 3 meters [10 feet] distance as you pass by pedestrians, cyclists, stopped/parked cars, buses, etc. If you cannot keep this distance (due to traffic conditions, say) then go at slow (bicycling) speed as you pass.

This avoids the following possible accident situations, where you can hit

1. a pedestrian or cyclist who steps/turns to the right to avoid an obstacle in his/her path, or just decides to cross the road,

2. A pedestrian who walks suddenly from behind a parked/stopped vehicle,

3. A vehicle parked/stopped on the road-side that starts moving onto the road and into your path (or else, a car that just opens a door).

On city streets, to allow space for pedestrians, cyclists, etc, ride at least 4-5 meters from the left edge of the road (i.e. leave the left-most lane free) unless you are going slow. This also helps you avoid traffic entering the road from the left side streets.

Also keep at least 3 meters distance from any vehicle you are overtaking, as it may turn suddenly to its right to avoid an obstacle (unseen by you) on its left. This is a specially common occurance when you overtake a large vehicle in a crowded place.

Last edited by Rollin' Thunda : 2nd April 2010 at 19:50.
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Old 3rd April 2010, 08:44   #36
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Default Tip 12: Expect anything can happen!

This is an impromptu post motivated by an incident that happened yesterday.

Taking advantage of the Good Friday holiday, I had gone for a long early morning ride encircling Kanpur on my TBTS. I was on the Kanpur Bypass, which is an elevated highway, 15-20 feet above ground level, some 25 km long. It is divided, with two lanes in each direction, having solid concrete walls on each side and tall barriers separating the two streams of traffic. The only breaks in these barriers occur once is every 5 km or so, where 20 meter gaps are placed to allow traffic to make U-turns. The road surface is of GQ quality. Because of its elevation, there are no pedestrians, cyclists, dogs and cattle to be found on it, and in the early morning the traffic is very sparse, just a few trucks and fast-moving SUVs are encountered while riding the entire length of the Bypass.

Such were the conditions yesterday, on my morning ride. I had done 100+ kmph on several previous occasions on this very road. But I don't go so fast anymore, and anyway as I was on a leisurely ride, I was coasting along at 70kmph in the left lane of a road that was empty as far as the eye could see.

No Hazard in sight, so the rider can relax, right? WRONG!
As I was approaching one of the 20 meter breaks in the divider a truck suddenly SCOOTED out of it, coming from the other side of the highway. Not to make a U-turn, but to continue moving at 40kmph or so in the WRONG WAY of the highway side I was on. In fact, it had entered with such speed that it swung across both lanes and was in my lane coming straight at me at some 60 meters distance [which looks a lot but at a combined 110kmph is just two seconds to impact]. I stayed on the left and started braking, which is always scary at 70kmph [some sand on the road and you've had it!]. I had reduced speed to maybe 30kmph or so [I wasn't looking at the speedo!], when the truck swung back into the other lane and we passed each other at a safe distance. Finally, I couldn't even call it a close call. But one second would have made all the difference.

Why didn't I see the truck before it entered my side of the highway? The tall barriers dividing the highway prevented me from seeing it.

Why did the truck driver want to drive the wrong way on the highway? There is no EXIT for trucks along the entire length of the elevated section of the Bypass, but there is one ENTRY point for Kanpur city traffic. I guess he wanted to go the wrong way to that entry point, and then EXIT From it into Kanpur city! So that just goes to show: EXPECT ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN ON THE ROAD.

PS: Yes, I had my head-light ON, so the truck-drive saw me the instant he entered my lane. One second would have made all the difference.
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Old 3rd April 2010, 19:37   #37
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4 back-to-back posts, spread over 4 days, without a comment. Er, is anyone reading this thread? Or am I just doing this
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Old 4th April 2010, 16:06   #38
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Default Tip 13: Anticipate others' actions

Notice obstacles in other vehicles' paths and anticipate their reactions: Watch out for vehicles, including cycles, making sudden movements to avoid obstacles [which includes slow-moving traffic/vehicles], or to avoid oncoming traffic. If traffic in the lane next to yours is slowing down, anticipate someone may suddenly change into your lane.

Look for clues of others' intentions: Drivers/riders slowing down and looking around are likely to make unexpected moves as soon as they find what they are searching for. Pedestrian/cyclists/drivers/riders looking right may make a sudden move to cross the road. If you suspect a particular vehicle may cut into your path, watch its front wheel -- its direction will indicate a turn a second before it actually happens.

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4 back-to-back posts, spread over 4 days, without a comment. Er, is anyone reading this thread? Or am I just doing this
A student at the institution where I work was killed this week-end, while riding on GT road on a two-wheeler. Which reminds me why I am doing this. I'll keep on posting.

Last edited by Rollin' Thunda : 4th April 2010 at 16:17.
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Old 4th April 2010, 17:11   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollin' Thunda View Post
A student at the institution where I work was killed this week-end, while riding on GT road on a two-wheeler. Which reminds me why I am doing this. I'll keep on posting.
I don't know about others, but I am reading, please keep up the good work.

Spike

P.S. I think there are no replies as members don't want to spoil your flow.
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Old 4th April 2010, 17:32   #40
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Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
I don't know about others, but I am reading, please keep up the good work.

Spike

P.S. I think there are no replies as members don't want to spoil your flow.
+1 to that. Keep up the tips bro, they are very useful for experienced riders as well.
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Old 5th April 2010, 19:02   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
I don't know about others, but I am reading, please keep up the good work.

Spike

P.S. I think there are no replies as members don't want to spoil your flow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammyboy View Post
+1 to that. Keep up the tips bro, they are very useful for experienced riders as well.
@spike and Sammyboy: Thanks for the

Actually, I do not think of myself as an expert, so if experienced riders disagree with any of the things I say, I would like them to opine, so that matter can be corrected/clarified. Otherwise, I'll just assume that we are all in agreement.
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Old 5th April 2010, 19:16   #42
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Default Tip 14: Slippery stuff on the road

What if you see a patch of gravel/oil on the road? If you cannot avoid the patch, reduce speed before you go over it [Braking on the patch is a bad idea], and stay straight and steady when on it.

Slippery stuff is particularly dangerous on turns, where your wheels can lose traction and slide away from under you, causing a fall.

Other slippery stuff: mud, cow-dung, and loose material (stone chips, sand, dirt, etc), wet leaves, iron man-hole covers, and (of course) ice.

Wet roads also tend to be slippery, so ride with caution in the rain. The first 30 minutes of a first rainfall are specially dangerous, as dried motor oil on the road gets released to make it a very slippery surface. Do not ride fast during rain, as you can easily hydroplane [even without braking] and lose control.

Also, new tyres are slippery: be careful while braking for the first 100 km, or so, after fitting new tyres.

If you are braking and coming towards a slippery patch: release/reduce the brakes for an instant before you go over the patch, and the apply them again after you are over it. [This will probably be difficult to do simultaneously with both brakes, so IMHO it would be best to first release both brakes, and re-apply only the front-brake.]

Last edited by Rollin' Thunda : 5th April 2010 at 19:26.
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Old 5th April 2010, 19:16   #43
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Originally Posted by Rollin' Thunda View Post
@spike and Sammyboy: Thanks for the

Actually, I do not think of myself as an expert, so if experienced riders disagree with any of the things I say, I would like them to opine, so that matter can be corrected/clarified. Otherwise, I'll just assume that we are all in agreement.
Well let me tell you what happened yesterday, I was riding around town at around 6pm trying to complete the run in period of my bike . I was on the extreme right close to the divider as the left side had an entry to a mall and there was a long line of cars there, also I had to take a right at the next intersection a few 100 mtrs ahead. There was a lady driving an Accent at about 60-65 kmph and I was riding at about 50-55 kmph. There would have been about a gap of about 15ft between me and her. Suddenly, this lady braked, there was nothing in front of her, no turn nothing..she just comes to a sudden dead stop on the extreme right side of the road. One quick glance on the rear view mirrow a second before showed me a goods carrier to my left, so I braked while ensuring that I do not move left and thanks to the distance and speed I had maintained was able to stop easily.

All the points that you had mentioned were sub conciously in my mind and though I have been riding for almost 18 years in total, I have hardly ridden for the last 6. Thanks to your posts everything came back together at the right time so, thank you again.

Last edited by sammyboy : 5th April 2010 at 19:22.
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Old 5th April 2010, 19:30   #44
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All the points that you had mentioned were sub conciously in my mind and though I have been riding for almost 18 years in total, I have hardly ridden for the last 6. Thanks to your posts everything came back together at the right time so, thank you again.
You just made my day!
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Old 5th April 2010, 21:12   #45
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Very good informative thread: Rollin' Thunda
Keep it coming.

OT: How do we give a rep / Star for a good thread like this? I'd like to give one.
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