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Old 4th May 2010, 15:43   #46
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Originally Posted by diwa View Post
If I remember right - There was an TVS Suzuki Supra SS which use to belch out 16bhp in stock. Can some body throw light on this.
Apparently this motorcycle did exist but no official confirmation. People say that it was mainly used at Sriperumbudur for racing. The other Supra pumped out 11 Bhp.

Mi10,

The prowler was a jazzed up Kawasaki KB125. It put out 12.5 Bhp and was styled similar to the Caliber Croma. It saw a very limited run before the emission norms killed it.

Cheers,

Jay
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Old 4th May 2010, 16:36   #47
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http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorb...ml#post1706472 (TVS-Suzuki Supra)
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Old 5th May 2010, 00:20   #48
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GOLDEN ERA-THE PENULTIMATE









Royal enfield also actually launched the country's first diesel bike, named the taurus and sold in limited quantities in select parts of the country in the mid 90s. Its fate and number sold are still unknown though.
Sid nice thread. One correction I guess Sooraj 325 was India's first diesel powered (with a Greaves diesel engine) motorcycle not the Enfield Taurus.

Even Sooraj Automobiles website claims "The Company originally started with the production of diesel motorcycles under the brand name "SOORAJ", which was the first commercially produced diesel motorcycle in the world...In the year 2000, the Company as a matter of strategy as also due to stringent emission norms against diesel motorcycles, discontinued the production of motorcycles and has been concentrating on the production and marketing of three wheelers alone."

Name:  soorajad.jpg
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(Photo: courtesy carwale.com)

Both Sooraj and Enfield was claimed a FE of above 80kmpl, considering the cost of a litre of diesel that time, riding these motorcycles were cheaper than walking (only you have to forget about engine vibration).

Sid you missed another bike - bajaj sx100 a first of its kind in India.Name:  Bajaj sxenduro.jpg
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Last edited by gaddiwale : 5th May 2010 at 00:37.
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Old 5th May 2010, 08:58   #49
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Originally Posted by gaddiwale View Post
Sid nice thread. One correction I guess Sooraj 325 was India's first diesel powered (with a Greaves diesel engine) motorcycle not the Enfield Taurus.

Even Sooraj Automobiles website claims "The Company originally started with the production of diesel motorcycles under the brand name "SOORAJ", which was the first commercially produced diesel motorcycle in the world...In the year 2000, the Company as a matter of strategy as also due to stringent emission norms against diesel motorcycles, discontinued the production of motorcycles and has been concentrating on the production and marketing of three wheelers alone."

Attachment 343018

(Photo: courtesy carwale.com)

Both Sooraj and Enfield was claimed a FE of above 80kmpl, considering the cost of a litre of diesel that time, riding these motorcycles were cheaper than walking (only you have to forget about engine vibration).

Sid you missed another bike - bajaj sx100 a first of its kind in India.Attachment 343019

(photo: courtesy topbikes.com)
Thanx for the info on sooraj. I have mentioned about the SX100 as SX enduro in the golden era title.
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Old 5th May 2010, 14:27   #50
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@Sid - Just wanted to mention about a motorcycle called AX100 that was introduced after Ind Suzuki; had almost no fibres I guess & more plastics with AX100 contributed to the Max100 series (Max100 & Max100 R).

OT - Sid, are you inspired by Porsche unleashed by any way? Because, I see the same classic, golden & modern era's classification in this thread.
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Old 5th May 2010, 15:25   #51
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Originally Posted by aargee View Post
@Sid - Just wanted to mention about a motorcycle called AX100 that was introduced after Ind Suzuki; had almost no fibres I guess & more plastics with AX100 contributed to the Max100 series (Max100 & Max100 R).
TVS Suzuki AX100 is the same bike as Ind Suzuki. The only difference was that the Ind Suzuki engine was a manufactured in Japan and the AX100 engine was manufactured here in India.
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Old 5th May 2010, 16:30   #52
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Yup, my uncle still has one, remember him telling that his was one of the first bikes. it has never got re-bored until now!

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TVS Suzuki AX100 is the same bike as Ind Suzuki. The only difference was that the Ind Suzuki engine was a manufactured in Japan and the AX100 engine was manufactured here in India.
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Old 5th May 2010, 16:41   #53
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Originally Posted by aargee View Post
@Sid - Just wanted to mention about a motorcycle called AX100 that was introduced after Ind Suzuki; had almost no fibres I guess & more plastics with AX100 contributed to the Max100 series (Max100 & Max100 R).
Both IND-SUZUKI AX 100 and TVS-SUZUKI AX 100 were one and same. The company's name was TVS-Suzuki and the model name for the initial couple of years was IND-SUZUKI. Then from 1986 onwards it carried the TVS-SUZUKI badge. I bought one in DEC'86 and it was my first bike!

The MAX 100 and MAX 100-R (R meant rugged, for rural use) were introduced a bit later, and were pure AC models without battery, if I remember right.

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Originally Posted by JayPrashanth View Post
Correct. It was the TVS Victor which the first fully indigenous bike. The entire R&D except the suspension development(which was partly done in Belgium) was done in India.

Cheers,

Jay
Before that the first indigenous effort was the "boss' Shogun. It was designed and developed by the R&D of TVS Suzuki, then validated by Suzuki Japan.

Last edited by Dippy : 6th May 2010 at 15:17. Reason: Back to back posts.
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Old 5th May 2010, 19:01   #54
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MODERN ERA

While the beginning of the new millennium saw scooters being re-activa-ted and motorcycles being pulsa-ted, competition has now become more heated and intense, especially at this tropical summer, balmy day, sit around 'cause you don't have much to say 'cause the heat is on..

Survival of the fittest. You know your in the hands of fate, now you don't bother you appreciate that the competition is on, so the heat is on..

Temperature is rising to fever pitch, competition is getting closer and the companies get rich...cause the heat is on..

Well, you know that money money money, is always sunny, in a rich man's world..

of course, alas! companies ke paas itne paise aane lage ki unhone money plant lagakar paise ped mein ugayee aur nadi mein bahaana shuru kar diya...

kyonki Money..money..money..always funny..in a rich man's world..

Kinetic invented a new technology-Kinetic energy recovery system in their management titled KERS and started poaching various companies for joint venture, in fact they kept burning kachua chaap coils here, there and everywhere so that someone can get caught in that holy smokes..talk about chances.
And after shopping here and there, the Kinetic energy recovered a system by forming a joint venture with Korea based Hyosung Motorcycle company and in a few months, launched their first product-the GF 125, powered by country's first 4 valve 4 stroke 125 cc engine. They also announced a change in logo, management yet again and established a new chain of dealerships.
They advertised heavily, and the motorcycle also got rave reviews from press and also did look stylish, especially the twin circular tailpipes. Sales took off to a decent start and the product was decently accepted in te Indian market.

Well, actually one night I was watching a movie called Bees Saal Baad in a theatre one midnight and the ghost was giving me goosebumps. I mean, the next day coincidently I got a news that Kapil Dev is now officially the boss..

Holy Quack-o-moly! Bees saal baad after India won the cricket world cup, Kapil Dev is declared the boss! and Kinetic recovers part of his energy and launches its second motorcycle in the commuter segment-the 100cc boss with none other than Kapil dev as his brand ambassador.

Ad commercials start and again, Kinetic's energy recovery system in the market pays decent dividends because the bike starts on a good note, especially in the north-western parts of the country.

Sulujja Firodia Motwani is so motivated that she fires 4 cruise missiles in the motorcycle segment, her KERS technique being applied even faster than the system reacts in F1 cars.

In one day, she shocks the press when she launches her 4 weapons of mass destruction:
  • The velocity- a 100 cc commuter motorcycle targeting the passion-ate segment of customers, it is aired with an ad campaign-aaye pakad mein? Actually the ad was quite innovative and it created wonders with 15,000 bikes sold in less than 45 days.
  • the boss gets bossier when she unveils the boss 115-a more powerful version of the boss targeted at semi urban commuter segment, read the CD segment. Sales remain decent but start to tumble due to competition.
  • to pulsate some more kinetic energy to customers, she unveils GF 170 city, basically a GF 125 with a bored out 170 cc engine. the GF 125 is phased out eventually.
  • Finally, to laser spray customers who want adrenao-a-lin gushing, she unveils the GF 170 laser, basically an extended faired variant of the GF 170 city.
But what kinetic failed to understand is that someone had already signed the CTBT, or the comprehensive test ban treaty, which prevents you to use the weapons of mass destruction in a mass scale. The GF 170 series were sales duds, despite Kapil's best efforts, after all the initial hoopla, the boss 115 went for a toss like Hari Sadu due to other options, and the velocity too failed to gain momentum in the long term...

Cited reasons could be poor after sales service, poor dealer attitude, poor dealer margins, absymal marketing techniques and management's confused policy of spraying here and there to catch the prey which would repel back like an ineffective deodorant and just when you think ki woh har pal saath nibhaiyega, usne galat waqt pe aapka saath choodh diya..sad!

Cruise-r control

The motorcycles also saw the creation of a new segment-that of cruiser bikes, bikes with a low riding position.
  • It was started when royal enfield launched its much awaited retro styled thunderbird 350 (and later added another bike-the lightning 500) and priced it at approx 95,000-1 lakh rupees. For royal enfield purists, it was a dream come true and the bike had its loyal fan following, RE kept the production of the bike in limited numbers though. the coming years would see constant improvements in the bike, all of which would be discussed as we progress with times.
  • The second company which wanted to eliminate the competition was Bajaj, which launched their cruiser bike-the 150 cc eliminator from the Kawasaki stable. again it was priced at a premium of Rs. 80,000 approx.
  • Yamaha, long struggling to gain a foothold after 5 debacles, wanted to entice the customer and it launched its affordable cruiser bike-christened the enticer, powered with a 125 cc engine and priced at Rs. 57,000-60,000 approx.
Now, how was the sales report card for these? While RE thunderbird and lighning twins had their own clientele base, the eliminator started off well but sales were mediocre to below average at best. High price with just a 150 cc engine was not what customers wanted. Besides, bajaj's policy of restricting sales of eliminator to select dealerships also did have an impact on sales and potential.
It seemed that yamaha finally tasted the success with the enticer with bikes selling like hot cakes, in fact college teens can be seen going enticer crazy and due to the bikes' combination of good looks, teardrop gas tank, decent power and affordable price made it a cruiser for the aam aadmi. But again, as the years passed, like any other bike, the enticer could not kept the momentum going and as the overall cruiser market declined, it too fizzled out early. But the biggest handicap that limited its success was yamaha's dwindling dealership network, partly poor margins and lack of dealer staff and below par motivation to be blamed. Another deserving product doomed..



A Karizma-tic approach by Hero Honda


The empire strikes back in a karizmatic manner when in 2003, the country's first "sportsbike" is launched.
It looks sharp, drop dead gorgeous and comes packed with features never before seen on a Indian motorcycle.
Meet the new Hero Honda karizma. Powered by 225 cc 17 ps single cylinder 4 stroke mill, it did a claimed 0-60 in 5 seconds, had mag wheels as standard equipment and for the first time, digital odo, tripmeter and clock on an Indian motorcycle. But yes, it was positioned as a rich boy's toy, priced at Rs. 79,000 at launch. The initial response was thunderous, actually the bikes flew off the showroom floors and just within 2-3 months was a pretty common sight in the big metros.

India finally got matured enough and the karizma took motorcycling joy to an entirely new level. What it lacked in outright power more than made in driveability, superb handling and surprisingly, the bike's comfortable riding position also made it an ideal long distance tourer. Initial hoopla aside, sales took a dramatic downturn after one year and the bike's price was dropped to Rs. 69,900. Still the bike racked in desired numbers for Hero Honda and it too developed its own base of loyal fans and supporters, often called as roadies after MTV used the bike to promote its show called MTV roadies.

But, Kinetic dismissed all the aforementioned launches as stale and took a bold step and launched two of its expensive nuclear bombs from the hyosung stable:
  • The Acquila, titled as "India's only real cruiser", it as a CBU import from Korea and only about 200 were to be imported for India, making it exclusive as well. Within days of launch, all 200 were sold and spoken for. It was billed as India's first imported bike, if the BMW F650 is not taken into consideration. It was only sold in select cities through exclusive chain of Kinetic dealerships and promised to offer sales, service and spares to the bike. After 18 months, the bike was again re-launched based on demand and another 200 were imported, all sold out in a short span of time. It was priced north of 2 lakh rupees IIRC.
  • The second bike was comet, a 250 cc sports performance bike, again imported from Korea. About 350-400 were imported and were sold against confirmed orders through selected dealerships only. Sadly, its novelty value waned as in the coming years, Kinetic itself was about to experience a shakeup in management again.
The commuter bike segment saw action yet again as LML fired its latest salvo at HH passion, called the freedom 100. It was later available as freedom 110 and freedom 125 also. But what really caught fancy of the market was that it looked too similar to the passion. Similarities aside, the bike sold well and kickstarted LML's resurgence in the bike segment.
LML shocked the market one time with launching not 1, not 2 but 15 different shades in freedom to celebrate India's independence. And more shocking was the choice of colours-daring to say the least-to be available, right from purple to pink to fluorescent to orange to yellow to white and many more this special edition bike became a rage in the country and was selling beyond what LML expected. So much that it had to quadruple the actual units planned.

Yamaha
meanwhile decided to take a daring fairing route when it launched its 106 cc libero motorcycle, with pretty radical looking "spider" headlight design which leaned forward. It was surely a love it or hate it design. But the market hated it and later the design was changed to convectional round headlight shape, because when people looked at it, they screamed...hoodibaba!!

No, I was kidding! it was bajaj that made this tagline extremely popular when it launched its latest commuter bike-the caliber 115. The hoodibaba campaign was so effective that it created sky-high hype in the market. Clearly, while splendid and passionate people were driving 100cc hero hondas, bajaj wanted to have pity at them and those who purchased the caliber 115, other 100 cc owners would scream hoodibaba at them for driving a bigger and a more powerful motorcycle.

Continuing its product renaissance, it also launched its new offering in the 125 cc segment-called the Kawasaki wind 125. It was a bike mainly targeted at export and so boasted of superb quality and refinement, but the real shot in the arm was its innovative ad campaign, in which a man comes out after taking a shower and just wears his clothes on and leaves to his destination. All body parts and clothes dry due to wind force except his butt! Wind biking ka khoob anand uthaya usne.

Bajaj also launched its boxer replacement in the 100 cc segment, simply named the CT 100. It too flopped later as the company continued to pulsate improvements.

Yes, the flagship of bajaj, the pulsar, got its first dramatic upgrade after launch with the launch of the Bajaj pulsar 150 and 180 DTSI.

DTSI stood for digital twin spark ignition and was the first mass produced two wheeler in the world to feature twin spark plugs for one cylinder and a bajaj patented technology called exhaustec to increase low end torque for better mileage and refinement, which was added at a later stage. The bikes' wheelbase was increased, gearbox heavily modified and improved for smoother shifts and suspension retuned for better handling with the addition of nitrox gas filled shock absorbers for improved ride comfort at the rear. Sales rebounded and skyrocketed again.

HH CBZ was a neglected child and simply just received a full sticker refresh and renamed as the CBZ*. Everything else was untouched save for some minor mechanical tweaking. But it did nothing to rebound sales, which continues to dwindle month after month.

TVS relaunched the fiero motorcycle under its own brand name and called it the Fiero F2. Compared to its stale predecessor, it was dramatically restyled and every panel was new and this revitalised the fiero brand name again in the 150 cc segment.

Scooting on the highway, Honda launched its second product-the 100 cc DIO, a cool looking "motoscooter", billed it as India's first cross of a scooter which gives the style and image of a motorcycle. Its high price meant that sales are mediocre at best.
Bajaj launched its first product at the mini scooter segment to counter the scooty-the saffire. Sales were still below average as the market themselves shifted to motorcycles. Besides, TVS again upgraded its scooty pep to scooty pep plus with a bigger motor.

The geared scooter market was close to extinct, but Honda decided to take a plunge and eternally gifted the market with its 150 cc geared scooter called the eterno and billed it as a "geared surprise".

Now, why have the tables have turned?
As the time progressed, it was the Japanese that dominated the Indian mass motorcycle market at one time.
Today, its the Indians that have beat the Japanese at their own game.

Clearly, the winner takes it all,
the loser's standing small,
besides the victory, that's a destiny...


Can the Japanese stage a comeback?

And what does destiny have in store for us?

Find out next, as the ride will be full of twists and turns..
'Cause I am a wing rider..

Last edited by Dippy : 6th May 2010 at 15:25. Reason: As requested
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Old 5th May 2010, 19:24   #55
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The MAX 100 and MAX 100-R (R meant rugged, for rural use) were introduced a bit later, and were pure AC models without battery, if I remember right.
Well Sir, Max100 was my first motorcycle, it doesn't have batteries & had a scooter horn, however Max100R has battery with a good regular horn, otherwise both motorcycles are exactly the same in terms of engine, frame, output & even mileage.

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Old 5th May 2010, 21:59   #56
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Bajaj also came out with an 100 cc called the Byk, which I think boasted an mileage of 100 kms per litre.
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Old 6th May 2010, 14:39   #57
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MODERN ERA

As time progresses, so does peoples' needs, demands and desires.
Quiet simply, ye dil maange more.
Kyonki there is no replacement for displacement, more for less is the mantra for motorcycle manufacturers to say-sar uthake jiyo.

There was an emergence of a new segment-motorcycles that blended a combination of performance, mileage, looks and decent price-that of the 125-135 cc segment, or urban commuter motorcycle.

If we tick back the clock, as mentioned by diwa, bajaj actually pioneered the concept of an affordable motorcycle for the masses-on that cost below 25,000 rupees and gave astounding mileage. They conceptualized, designed and launched a very diminutive 100cc motorcycle called the byk 100, tagged as first sport. In fact, scooter buyers or first time two wheeler owners gave it an instant thumbs up and it wen off to a flying start with 10,000 units sold in just 3 weeks and the company worked an extra day to produce more bikes to keep up with the demand.

However, while the bike did continue to do decent business, it was pulsar that was proving to be more profitable for bajaj. And to everyone's surprise, the management at Bajaj decided not to concentrate on 100 cc bikes anymore but on the newly emerging 125-135 cc segment, because the business case was proving more favorable to the stakeholders.
The first casualties for this business decision were byk, which ended production, and then the caliber 115, which to was phased out eventually along with regular caliber. The wind 125 did not do so well, but it was primarily exported to Latin American markets.

So, finally it was time for bajaj to discover its roots again and after much speculation in the market about an all new bike from bajaj, the company finally unveiled its much awaited discover 125 as a more powerful alternative to the splendor/passion twins, at just a marginal price premium. Jackie Chan was shown in an ad commercial and the bike became an overnight success, actually it succeeded so much that it threw hero honda's overambitious plans into a blast furnace. It's bread and butter models were under threat.

So, how did the empire react? Of course, pretty ambitiously and launched its first new commuter bike in 8 years-the "regal crested" ambition and one upped the discover 125 by offering a 135 cc engine. It was tom-tomed that hero honda's target group is both discover and pulsar buyers and its unique tri-pod instrument cluster above the round headlight was marketed as a regal crest, something that consumers found it difficult to digest and just termed hero honda's efforts as deliberate to stage a comeback to its waning market share. it even re-stickered the splendor and passion and added a plus tag to both bikes.

Alloy wheels were fast becoming a norm and almost all commuter bikes were now sporting it as a standard fitment in select variants.
Hero Honda's ambitious plans were just becoming ambiguous as its ambition was beaten black and blue by people who discover-ed a new option from Bajaj and there's another victor-ous threat to come from down south.

TVS
had already parted ways with suzuki and was working on its new motorcycle in 125 cc segment-the victor. Like many of you mentioned that it too was fully indigenously designed and developed by TVS, it was the company's first shot at the commuter bike segment and the company's first bike to be launched under a new corporate identity and its own brand name. It started off well and sold as the company expected it to, with maximum demand coming from southern and south-eastern part of the country.

Yamaha
, operating like a zinda laash too jumped into the 125cc segment and launched its bike-the fazer 125, again with a controversial twin headlamp spiderman like fairing, clearly a love it or hate it design. With the enticer not being able to entice buyers in the long run, it was phased out and the libero was the sole offering left from the company. But, yamaha's daring design strategies was not daring enough for public to regain back some of its lost glory and the fazer too sold below expectations, continuing in an never ending chapter of Yamaha's Indian failures and mounting losses in its balance sheets.

In a confused policy of twists and turns, bajaj conveyed that its not leaving 100 cc segment for good and would like to have presence there, since hero honda's cash cows were still milking its splendid and passionate customers. Pissed off, bajaj phased out its wind and CT 100 models and replaced it with a bike that was designed to show jhalaks to girls from men who rode them. It was called the platina and it had a tagline-jhalak dikhla ja.

Buoyed by the success of discover 125, the company in the coming years also launched the discover 135 and discover 112 cc, increasing its presence in every segment possible and confusion customers further.

LML, long plagued by labour troubles and mounting losses in its operations, faced many strikes in its kanpur plant and phased out its bikes-energy, adreno and freedom and just produced its 2 scooters-the NV and elect in limited numbers. Yes, the company will come back, but more on that later.

As we scoot along the ridges in a series of twists and turns, there are hardly any scooters left in the market, with majority of the companies concentrating on the motorcycle segment in particular. Yet, Honda trios of activa, dio and eterno contain to sell briskly, with the active and eterno garnering more than 75 percent of the companyís volumes, with the dio bringing up the rest. The scooters get their first sticker upgrades and their technical innovations are highlighted on the product itself.

The scoterrette segment heats up again with kinetic once again re-launching itself with two products-the zing, targeted at scooty base model and style, targeted at scooty pep plus. Later, the zing is also launched as the zing rocking series with built in features like FM radio, mobile chargers etc, college students being the target market.
The kinetic DX scooters later would also be upgraded to four stroke but itís a classic case of too little, too late. But, its only time for it to have some pizzazz..

The bajaj saffire is also upgraded and re-launched at cut price, while all its scooter production grinds to a halt with the company shifting its focus to motorcycles.

Hero Honda in a very smart marketing move, decides to jump into the ungeared scooter market and launches an activa for those who just want pleasure, read that women and just to answer the big question-why should boys have all the fun, comes an answer in the form of Hero Honda pleasure, a light and zippy 100cc scooter. Basically, it sits on the same mechanicals as the activa and gets the same features; only the body panels and branding are different.
In a daring move, it announces the opening of exclusive just 4 her showrooms which would exclusively cater to women riders and everything will be designed and catered keeping women buyers in mind. It does call for an extra investment though which puts pressure on dealers to open extra showrooms. The plan backfires with the results being not good as it was expected it to be. Many just 4 her showrooms never see the light of the day, and many shut down owing to lack of customer interest, only a select few operate. The scooter itself sells below expectations, with the clone backfiring its overambitious plans.

However, the year 2004 heralded a grand comeback for the wing logoed Honda as it prepares to light diwali firecrackers by launching its first motorcycle for the Indian market-called the unicorn. While not exactly ground breaking, it does have unique features like a rear monoshock, tuff-up puncture resistant tube, claimed 60 kmpl mileage and the best of all, its 150 cc engine, easily the most refined and the smoothest engine ever seen on a production Indian market motorcycle in the mass segment. It is powerful yet efficient enough and most importantly, environmentally friendly too.
So it does not come as a surprise that when it is launched at a very competitive price of below Rs. 50,000 in Pune, it becomes an instant hit and initial lots are all booked out for 3-4 months. In fact, people saw this as the first threat to pulsar which was selling briskly. The unicorn, as mentioned before, had it all what a sensible Indian working class commuter wanted, coupled with the reliability factor, all helped it to garner sales success.

So, did bajaj sat just quietly? Obviously not.
It dramatically upgraded its pulsar 150 and 180 twins for the second time, increased engine power and torque, improved gearshift and handling and added alloys as standard to make the unicorn seriously underequipped in comparison. Sales rebounded and it was like a two way cola war between bajaj and Honda, pulsar VS unicorn.
TVS too responded by fully remodelling its fiero F2 and renaming it as the fiero FX with again a round headlamp design to give some fight before its next model could hit the market.

And where did the empire go? The CBZ craze was all but over, the ambition flopped, the karizma sales were dwindling, and the CD dawn/CD deluxe were just products treated like stepmothers, its sole cash cows being customers who are just splendid or passionate about biking in 100s.

Now, as the paradigm shifts to an entirely new level, many manufacturers will eye new technologies and new innovations to lure back customers.

There will be a southern storm when the company varies its timing intelligently by launching a revolutionary new engine in a new motorcycle.

And how does the empire react? Did the king lose its crown?

Find out next, as this story gets some more fuel injected into it...
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Old 6th May 2010, 15:10   #58
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Sid,
Fantastic work. But, a couple of things that I would like to bring to your notice:
RE Lightening was 535cc
Kawasaki Eliminator was 173cc

For all,
Calibre115 was the first 110cc 4-stroke bike to offer over 9 BHP... long before Honda launched the Stunner with over 9 BHP. This speaks high of Indian R&D.
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Old 6th May 2010, 15:22   #59
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There are a few omissions in this thread, notably:

a) Mopeds : the Suvega, TVS 50, and the only front wheel drive moped "Atlasolex". The "Sportif" from Peugeot. Then there was the only four stroke in this category, the "Cadi-50". The Sportif and Cadi could not be pedalled though.

b) Mobikes: The Rajdoot "Bobby", the Enfield 200 (later "Mini Bullet") and the Yezdi 250 twin.

c) Minibikes/stepthru's : The Vicky, BSA Bond.

d) Scooters: "Fantabulous" the scooter with foot operated gears from Enfield. "Avanti", a lookalike of Vijay, from Kelvinator India. And "Priya", a Bajaj (Vespa) lookalike from Maharashtra scooters.

Trivia: AFAIK the Jawa/Yezdi was the only bike with interchangeable wheels and the Bobby the only bike with a stepney!
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Old 6th May 2010, 15:30   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
a) Mopeds : the Suvega, TVS 50, and the only front wheel drive moped "Atlasolex". The "Sportif" from Peugeot. Then there was the only four stroke in this category, the "Cadi-50". The Sportif and Cadi could not be pedalled though.
Whoa!!! Sir, could you throw some light on Atlasolex pls? Would like to hear before Google.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
d) Scooters: "Fantabulous" the scooter with foot operated gears from Enfield. "Avanti", a lookalike of Vijay, from Kelvinator India. And "Priya", a Bajaj (Vespa) lookalike from Maharashtra scooters.
Avanti, I think Sid provided some link on brouchers in previous page.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
Trivia: AFAIK the Jawa/Yezdi was the only bike with interchangeable wheels
Couldn't get. Can you elaborate pls?
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