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Old 12th May 2010, 22:50   #16
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Originally Posted by justROYal View Post
I have had the good fortune of clocking a few non-stop miles on my Bullet, and I know it for a fact that Bullet exhausts get seriously hot. On the ride from Hyderabad to Ooty for the Rider Mania, my friend's saddlebag caught fire from the Exhaust heat. So this might make you rethink the whole exhaust "close to" the battery concept. How close is far enough? At what speed? for how long?
Is that Normal? Got to rethink about the exhaust then. I'm sure a heat shield might help. I guess everything on the woodsman strengthens the fact that it was made for a single rider.

I've read that the exhaust isn't that hot. There isn't much information on the net for the bike which makes it more difficult.


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My suggestion there would be to move the battery to the right as you have no use for the air filter casing there if you fit a K&N.
I never knew i could do that. Good info there.
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Old 13th May 2010, 09:57   #17
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Is that Normal? Got to rethink about the exhaust then. I'm sure a heat shield might help. I guess everything on the woodsman strengthens the fact that it was made for a single rider.

I've read that the exhaust isn't that hot. There isn't much information on the net for the bike which makes it more difficult.




I never knew i could do that. Good info there.
Ask any Bullet rider and they will tell you stories about how they burnt their ankles on the exhaust at some point of time or the other. The exhaust pipe is essentially sheet metal of a medium guage. So when you pass hot exhaust fume inside that for a long duration (like say on a ride where you are doing 750 kms in a day), it is bound to get hot as hell.

Well there's nothing much to do. Your battery has two contact points for +ve and -ve and you need the leads connected to those points. doesnt matter where your battery is kept. Keep it in a bag on your back and you have the ultimate safety device for your bike. So Once you take out your normal Air filter, you have a pretty large gap on the Right side. The standard air filter routes air through the chromed box before it reaches the carb. Now that you will have a K&N mounted directly in your carb, you will have all that space unused. You might consider that place for the battery.
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Old 14th May 2010, 17:30   #18
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Then the battery positioning is a must on my list. There would be no problem with the left side exhaust. The picture shows a closeup of the left side battery cover where the exhaust passes through.

Hope the guy on Dinnur main road will fabricate this as well.
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-woodsman-leftside-.jpg

There seems to be another bracket point behind the rear shocks.
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-bracket-view-bend.jpg

A clear view of the right side front footpeg.
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-left-side-footpeg.jpg

@ justROYal. Will the local fabricators be able to make this kind of a muffler?
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-muffler.jpg

Another issue is the gear lever which seems a little complicated to make.
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-gearside-footpeg.jpg

Maybe a contraption like the ones on mcdeebs is possible to make.

Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-sixdays05.jpg
Differences between RE Electra X and the New Electra Twinspark-thruxtonmcdeeb04.jpg

Lots more research to be done.
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Old 17th May 2010, 19:23   #19
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Then the battery positioning is a must on my list. There would be no problem with the left side exhaust. The picture shows a closeup of the left side battery cover where the exhaust passes through.

Hope the guy on Dinnur main road will fabricate this as well.


There seems to be another bracket point behind the rear shocks.


A clear view of the right side front footpeg.


@ justROYal. Will the local fabricators be able to make this kind of a muffler?


Another issue is the gear lever which seems a little complicated to make.


Maybe a contraption like the ones on mcdeebs is possible to make.
Lots more research to be done.
First things first, awesome pics dude!!! I am inspired to do a photoshoot of my bike slong similar lines.

Fabrication of the side panel would be a slight problem. The guage of material used and the finish might turn out to be a slight eyesore on an otherwise beautiful motorcycle.

The recently launched Honda CB Unicorn Dazzler comes with a contoured sie panel. You might want to find out if there is any way that can be cut/moulded to fit the Bullet panel. Then you can have a sheet metal inner surface with a clamping system, and you can clad it with a remoulded panel from the Dazzler.

As for the silencer, I doubt if the double layered silencer can be fabricated by the Dinnur guys. What you can do however is look at cutting and refinishing an RX100 muffler. It looked similar. However, the Dinnur guys are pretty good with exhaust feedback basics and they can modify the internals accordingly. I suggest you show them the pic and ask for their inputs. There's a guy called Javed there if I am not too mistaken, who seems pretty knowledgible about exhaust systems.

Now the footpeg + gear lever - as you can see you have posted pics of different bikes with one common feature - all of them have a rearset and a gear lever that actually uses a hinged-lever mechanism to actually shift. One stop-gap arrangement that I had seen once had a rearset just behind a toe-heel shifter, in which the toe part has been sawn off. So the heel part is in front of your toes, and you shift that. But it is unreliable and can cause mistakes that can be fatal at high speeds. The arrangement in your pics is a pretty standard arrangement. In fact anyone who pushes the footrests forward for a cruiser/chopper feel often ends up using a similar mechanism for the gear-shift.

I wish I could have been in Bangalore to actually take your bike around places and find out what all needs to be done and then actually start doing those things.
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