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Old 1st July 2010, 22:58   #16
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If the engine runs out of oil, I guess it cannot lubricate the pistons etc, ends up dry and ceases to work, becomes worthless! Thats what happened to a cousin of mine, though he was able to get it in shape at a cost of 15k, I'm sure ride is not a pleasure with that kind of an engine.
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Old 1st July 2010, 23:15   #17
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Overheating, misfiring, excesssive vibrations

You should always personally check the oil level using the dipstick when you take delivery of your bike/car after a service. The number of times the "engineers" forget to re-fill oil is not funny.

Now that you have an apache that comes with a tachometer, i suggest you get in the habit of using that to use the gears rather than the speedometer

Last edited by Deeps : 1st July 2010 at 23:18.
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Old 2nd July 2010, 08:56   #18
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Thanks both. Will ensure the dipstick test is done. Somehow makes me check things right now
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Old 2nd July 2010, 11:18   #19
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Get a copy of Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch. It is highly recommended for those who ride on the street and not just on the track.

Covers each and every aspect in detail. Available via torrent downloads or you can order online via Amazon or eBay.
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Old 2nd July 2010, 11:48   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdna View Post
This suddenly popped into my head. What are the symptoms of no engine oil in the sump?
The symtoms would start early in the day. You would get up from the wrong side of the bed, your worst enemy would be the first one to call you, the tea will be spilled on your brand new shirt, the neighbourhood cat would cross your path as you are getting down the stairs, etc.

If any one of the above happens check your dipstick before cranking the bike.

But seriously the first symptom would be a sieze in some 500 mts of riding. From then on its all downhill.
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Old 2nd July 2010, 12:06   #21
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From origin to destination,
Keep your feet on the road only when there is no other choice. Like stopping at a signal for instance.
You don't use brakes for slowing down. They are there only when you MUST stop.
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Old 2nd July 2010, 22:17   #22
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Originally Posted by n_aditya View Post
Get a copy of Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch. It is highly recommended for those who ride on the street and not just on the track.

Covers each and every aspect in detail. Available via torrent downloads or you can order online via Amazon or eBay.
Thanks. Will check this out.

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The symtoms would start early in the day. You would get up from the wrong side of the bed, your worst enemy would be the first one to call you, the tea will be spilled on your brand new shirt, the neighbourhood cat would cross your path as you are getting down the stairs, etc.

If any one of the above happens check your dipstick before cranking the bike.

But seriously the first symptom would be a sieze in some 500 mts of riding. From then on its all downhill.
LOL!! Didn't know that 500mts was enough to seize the bike. Nightmare!!

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From origin to destination,
Keep your feet on the road only when there is no other choice. Like stopping at a signal for instance.
You don't use brakes for slowing down. They are there only when you MUST stop.
I kinda suck in balancing at slow speeds. This also means, playing with the clutch and gears again. Will have to practice hard on this.
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Old 4th July 2010, 02:05   #23
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My ride style does not mean playing the clutch.
In fact once when my clutch cable snapped I rode close to 35 kms in heavy city traffic without a major issue.

This is not sometime that can be taught. Use this as a base idea and figure it out yourself.
Trust me, you will be able to do it.
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Old 9th December 2010, 16:46   #24
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

Back to this thread after a long time and one more question comes here. Dumb or not, here we go! How far do you pull in your clutch lever for shifting? After hearing people telling me how not to pull the lever all the way back in while riding at good speed, now the same guys contradict; saying that the lever should go back in for ALL the gears!! So, how do you do it on your bike?(mentioning the one you ride will help as well)
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Old 9th December 2010, 16:56   #25
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

Hey rdna. Good to see you here!

When the clutch is half pulled in the gears are not completely disengaged, but the gears will still shift.

Quite frankly I sometimes pull it in completely when I'm coasting slowly, but most of the times when I need to accelerate quickly I pull in only half. Clutch life has not been any different so far. Prior to the first clutch plates replacement I was riding with pulling in the clutch all the way in and then shifting.
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Old 9th December 2010, 22:34   #26
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

I do not see any reason NOT to pull the lever fully for shifting at any gear or speed. The only reason why you might need to do this is when you are doing a drag race or something (when you want to save the time of pulling it back all the way).. But that would ruin your clutch.
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Old 9th December 2010, 23:07   #27
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

One small tip, make it a habit to catch the fuel tank with the insides of your thighs when braking; will go a long way helping you to avoid skidding the front on heavy braking when it is actually required, call it reflex action.
This is a very common cause of skidding when the entire body weight comes onto the handle bars and get transferred to the relatively smaller cross section of the front wheel.
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Old 9th December 2010, 23:29   #28
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Question Re: Biking lessons please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by praful View Post
Hey rdna. Good to see you here!

When the clutch is half pulled in the gears are not completely disengaged, but the gears will still shift.

Quite frankly I sometimes pull it in completely when I'm coasting slowly, but most of the times when I need to accelerate quickly I pull in only half. Clutch life has not been any different so far. Prior to the first clutch plates replacement I was riding with pulling in the clutch all the way in and then shifting.
Good to see you back as well Praful So, in your case the life of the clutch has been more or less the same no matter how you shift; completely pulled in or the quick blipping way. Interesting.

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I do not see any reason NOT to pull the lever fully for shifting at any gear or speed. The only reason why you might need to do this is when you are doing a drag race or something (when you want to save the time of pulling it back all the way).. But that would ruin your clutch.
I guess I'm fully not used to pulling it in fully on a torquey machine. Check this link : *All Things Motorcycle* - How far do you pull in your clutch to shift I'll have the same "dumping" or "popping" effect and the bike lunges a bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aburagohain View Post
One small tip, make it a habit to catch the fuel tank with the insides of your thighs when braking; will go a long way helping you to avoid skidding the front on heavy braking when it is actually required, call it reflex action.
This is a very common cause of skidding when the entire body weight comes onto the handle bars and get transferred to the relatively smaller cross section of the front wheel.
Thanks for the tip. Yes, reflex action definitely makes you hold the tank. Been through this twice during panic braking and there has been good control of the bike.
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Old 10th December 2010, 02:03   #29
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

Would depend entirely on the play in your clutch cable.

Ideally, all gear shifts should be done with no revving and the clutch fully engaged.

Ride Safe. Cheers
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Old 10th December 2010, 10:41   #30
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Default Re: Biking lessons please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdna View Post
I guess I'm fully not used to pulling it in fully on a torquey machine. Check this link : *All Things Motorcycle* - How far do you pull in your clutch to shift I'll have the same "dumping" or "popping" effect and the bike lunges a bit.
What do you ride?

Regards
Spitfire
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