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Old 23rd June 2015, 21:18   #1
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Default Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

The Maruti Celerio Diesel has been launched in India at a price of between Rs. 4.65 - 5.71 lakhs (ex-Delhi).

What you’ll like:

• The cheapest Maruti diesel in India. LDi variant starts at merely Rs. 4.65 lakhs
• 793 cc engine offers decent driveability. It's also peppy enough for city commutes
• Terrific fuel economy. ARAI rating is 27.62 kmpl
• Well-packaged cabin. Adequate legroom, excellent headroom and a 235 liter boot
• Suspension offers neutral ride quality & predictable handling
• Maruti’s excellent after-sales service & wide dealer network

What you won’t:

• Poor refinement levels. Engine sounds very crude
• Underpowered on the expressway. Lacks top-end...runs out of breath easily
• Rs. 75,000 - 80,000 premium (over the petrol) is too much for a 2-cylinder motor
• Higher variants are too expensive! Cars with larger engines (Beat, Figo, Ritz) are close
• Flimsy build & economy-grade quality
• Even the VDi middle variant lacks kit (no tachometer, tilt steering, rear wiper & washer etc.). Only the ZDi has acceptable levels of equipment


Last edited by GTO : 24th June 2015 at 00:22.
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Old 23rd June 2015, 21:25   #2
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Since the Maruti Celerio petrol has already been reviewed by Team-BHP, this report will only focus on the diesel engine. For easy reference, here are direct links to the complete Celerio road-test:

Exterior design & build quality (Maruti Celerio : Official Review)

Interior design, space, practicality & features (Maruti Celerio : Official Review)

Engine, ride & handling (Maruti Celerio : Official Review)

The Smaller yet Significant Things (Maruti Celerio : Official Review)


Last edited by GTO : 23rd June 2015 at 21:27.
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Old 23rd June 2015, 22:00   #3
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Big shoutout to S2!!! & Tushar for the pictures!



Maruti must consider the Celerio to be its lucky charm. After all, this is the 2nd time that the company is using it as a launch pad for something new. First up was the AMT (automated manual transmission) which went on to enjoy a healthy level of acceptance in India. It was a superbly marketed gearbox too. Now, we have the 2-cylinder diesel engine making its debut in the Celerio. There is another reason behind the car's choice though. The Celerio brand is only 1.5 years old. Maruti would rather experiment with a newer brand than its older & more established nameplates like the Alto & WagonR. It's risk management 101. See how the AMT made it to the Alto only after getting the seal of approval on the Celerio.

This isn't only Maruti's first diesel engine, but even parent Suzuki's. The Japanese car maker has never developed a diesel engine till date. Honestly, I find that disappointing. Maruti commands half the market in India, selling a whopping 100,000 cars each month. I can't think of any other manufacturer in such a dominant position that has outsourced its diesel engine requirements for so long. As we know, Maruti's diesel cars are powered by the Fiat 1.3L MJD motor. There was also a brief flirtation with Peugeot which led to the French 1.5L TUD5 being shoehorned into the Zen's tiny engine bay. Well, it's good to see Maruti finally making its own way. All said and done, just the fact that they've started experimenting is a welcome move. After the AMT & this 2-cylinder diesel, mass-market (cheaper) hybrids & small turbo-petrols are supposedly in the pipeline.

Maruti & its suppliers have invested Rs. 900 crore into the DDiS 125, a small 793 cc 2-cylinder diesel. It is already 97% localised (in terms of value) and the company expects between 20-30% of Celerio customers to opt for the diesel. The DDiS 125 will inevitably power other cars in Maruti's portfolio too. The engine is cheap to build, small and fuel-efficient. While urban owners might have higher expectations, I expect it to do better in rural India, where Maruti's sales machinery continues to go from strength to strength. Rural & semi-urban customers are less demanding about power & refinement. Fact is, the DDiS 125 just about passes muster in the Celerio, but it's surely more suited to cars from a segment below (read = Alto & around). Expectations rise with price and it'll be a tough sell at the Celerio's price band, especially the Z variants. This engine will find greater acceptance in the entry-level segment. The two-cylinder diesel has further potential in commercial applications (e.g. Omni & Eeco). Maruti has already begun testing this engine in its Y9T LCV - video link.

Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review-maruti-celerio-diesel-price-specifications.png

Maruti isn't the only game in town though. Renault too is building a similar sized 2-cylinder diesel (link to news article). Earlier, Tata had put in a lot of testing kms on the twin-cylinder diesel Nano, before eventually shelving the variant. I'm sure Tata will be closely watching the market's response to Maruti's small diesel; it could have an impact on Tata's product plans.

This is the first two-cylinder diesel passenger car in India. Forget two-cylinders, you can count the 3-cylinder diesels on your fingers (Beat, Grand i10, Quanto, Mini Cooper etc.). The Celerio was the cheapest Maruti AT, and this is the cheapest Maruti diesel. The base LDi variant costs merely 5 lakhs on the road in Delhi. That said, the Rs.75,000 - 80,000 premium over the petrol equivalent is just too much. Let's not forget that it has a cylinder less than its petrol sister & Maruti doesn't have to pay royalties to anyone (like it does with the 1.3L diesel). Then, as we'd mentioned in our earlier Celerio review, the Celerio petrol MT is by itself overpriced. Add the hefty premium that the diesel carries, and it becomes hard to justify a Rs. 6.9 lakh on the road Mumbai price for the ZDi (O) variant with merely 47 BHP on tap! Even the Alto 800 has 47 horses. What about a diesel AMT variant? I don't see it coming because there's no room above this price point for it.

Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review-maruti-celerio-feature-list.png

Neutral clothes that will appeal to all, and offend none:


Weighs 70 kilos more than its petrol sibling:


Available in 6 colours, including a red & a yellow:


165/70 R14 tyres. The base LDi variant wears puny 155/80 R13 shoes:


The DDiS' reputation was built on the 1.3L MJD. Maruti is smartly using the same moniker for its in-house diesel now. DDiS badge is stuck onto both front fenders:


ZDi is the only variant with acceptable levels of equipment. Forget the LDi, even the middle VDi lacks essential kit:


Clean & tidy underbody. 35 liter plastic fuel tank is located under the rear seat:


Two parting shots. Our test car had the chrome accessory kit slapped on. You can see the chrome foglamp surround...


...and on the side of the tail-lamps:

Last edited by GTO : 28th June 2015 at 19:17.
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Old 23rd June 2015, 22:03   #4
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

User-friendly, straightforward dashboard. Notice something different? Our test Celerio had black faux wood inserts around the center console, gear lever and door armrest areas (earlier silver):


Nice steering wheel is shared with the Swift. Integrated audio & phone controls. Mute button is particularly useful. At parking speeds, I found the steering to be a little heavier than the petrol's:


Revv counter marked till 6,000 on the diesel (8,000 on the petrol). The DDiS revvs to a max of 4,900 rpm:


That yellow sign (image center) warns you if there is water in the diesel filter:


MID gives you data on the fuel economy (real-time & average) and distance-to-empty:


ABC pedals are well-spaced. The Celerio diesel uses a hydraulic clutch (petrol = cable operated clutch):


5-speed gearbox is standard fare:


The main & spare keys are the same . Many manufacturers give you a bare-bone spare key (without any buttons). Press once and only the driver's door unlocks, press twice to unlock all doors and the hatch:


Illuminated scuff plates, another accessory on our test car:


The Celerio's ICE comes with a remote control! The Safari Storme we tested last week costs thrice as much, but doesn't get one:


Spare is a standard steel wheel:


Tyre pressures are identical to the petrol. The front, especially, looks to be on the higher side:

Last edited by GTO : 24th June 2015 at 14:57. Reason: Adding point on how the key's unlock button works
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Old 23rd June 2015, 22:05   #5
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

The DDiS 125



How it looks in the Celerio's engine bay:


• The first diesel engine from Suzuki. Developed from a clean sheet of paper. Took 4 years of R&D.

• This is a two-cylinder, 793 cc motor, dubbed the E08A.

• DOHC with 4 valves / cylinder.

• 47 BHP (@ 3,500 rpm) and 125 Nm of peak torque (@ 2,000 rpm). Makes its max power early (most diesels do between 4,000 - 4,400 rpm).

• Bore x Stroke (mm): 77.0 x 85.1.

• Compression ratio: 15.1.

Moderator MPower says that it appears to be a low cost fuel-injection system that strikes a suitable compromise between the hi-tech, but pricey common-rail and the old school distributor-pump DI system. The DDiS does away with the common rail and seems to feed pressurized diesel from the pump to the cylinders via some kind of block.

• Engine weighs 89 kilos. For the sake of comparison, the Swift's 1.3L weighs 128 kg.

• Aluminium cylinder block. Lighter, but also noisier (similar case with Honda's 1.5L i-DTEC).

• Uses a small fixed geometry turbo developed by BorgWarner & supplied by Turbo Energy, Chennai.

• Yes, it has an intercooler (vertically-mounted).

• Manufactured at Gurgaon. Current production capacity is about 100,000 / year.

• ARAI rating: 27.62 kmpl.

• Maruti has put the DDiS 125 through 4+ lakh kms of testing.

• The Celerio's front end needed to be beefed up to handle the diesel. The DDiS is not only heavier than the petrol, but it also vibrates a lot more.

• This 0.8L could be the daddy of an upcoming family of diesels. While Maruti denies it, rumour mills insist that 1.2L (same engine with one more cylinder) and 1.6L (with double the cylinders) versions are in the pipeline.

• Currently the smallest diesel engine in a passenger car in the world. The previous record holder - Smart ForTwo - used to have a 799 cc diesel.

• Because the engine is always working at a higher rpm than usual (details in the driving post), I have concerns about its wear and tear rate.

Last edited by GTO : 28th June 2015 at 19:19.
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Old 23rd June 2015, 22:07   #6
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

The smallest diesel engine to power a passenger car...worldwide! The only other twin-cylinder car in India is the Tata Nano:


Turn the ignition and the starter cranks in a s-l-o-w motion. It also cranks for a longer duration than is normally the case, before the engine fires to life. The engine startup / shutdown procedures bring a lot of unpleasant shake & movement to the cabin. When idling, the DDiS has a typical two-cylinder note that's a put off. And yes, it'll be louder in your building compound or basement parking. The crude engine note is agricultural in nature, and comparisons to a diesel generator / auto rickshaw / Tata Nano are inevitable. This could be a deal breaker in showrooms. The idling speed with air-con is 1,000 rpm. Maruti seems to have set it higher to control idling vibrations. Despite that, you can feel the engine's rocking motion & mild vibrations on the floor, ABC pedals, seat, doorpad & gear lever. Switching the air-con off makes the needle drop to 950 rpm, and the vibrations only increase.

The Celerio's starting experience and driving it in 1st gear (because engine rpm is in the highest proportion to speed in 1st) are the most annoying. Get moving, roll up the windows, start the air-con + music and things get better. Cabin insulation is superior to the likes of the Alto as this is a more modern car. The engine is noisy on the outside, but lesser so on the inside. Once on the road, the sound isn't that bothersome in 2nd gear & up. Spend a couple of kms with the Celerio diesel and you'll find the NVH to be acceptable while driving. Far from ideal, yes, but liveable. Unlike 3-cylinder engines though, the DDiS doesn't smoothen out with revvs. It only gets more noisy! As the revv needle climbs, you can feel vibrations on the accelerator pedal too. What about the highway then? It's a mild hum at 100 kph. At 120 kph, wind noise is more than that of the engine.

Let's get one thing out of the way. Within the city, you won't feel that the li'l diesel is underpowered. For such a small 2-cylinder engine, it offers good driveability. The Celerio diesel is also reasonably peppy this side of 70 - 80 kph. You can work the engine and easily stay with the traffic. The DDiS 125 has enough torque to do the job. What helps the engine is the light weight of the car. It would probably get bogged down with a European type of build. Throttle response at low rpms is decent and turbo-lag is controlled. You'll rarely need to downshift to 1st, unless you come to an absolute stop. In most situations, you can get away in 2nd itself. Even on speed breakers, be a little patient and you can drive off in 2nd gear. I attempted going up a fairly steep incline and the Celerio diesel climbed up without a fuss in 1st.

As you accelerate, you feel a mild turbo boost and the mid-range is where the action is, but it's short-lived. The engine has quite a narrow power band, primarily due to the empty top end (more on that later). The punch is quickly over. The max that the engine revvs to is 4,900 rpm and to give you an idea of the gearing, here are the max speeds in the initial lot: 38 kph (1st), 68 kph (2nd) and 102 kph (3rd). What you will notice is that the engine is always running at a higher rpm than usual. Reason? Because of its small displacement & resultant short gearing, it has to work much harder than the 1.3 - 1.5L diesels that we're accustomed to. For instance, 1st gear at 30 kph sees the engine spinning at 3,800 rpm! 5th gear @ 100 kph is seen at 3,000 rpm (Swift diesel = 2,300 rpm). At 120 kph, the needle is hovering at 3,500 rpm. In nearly all driving situations, the engine was 750 - 1,000 rpm higher than I thought it would be, before I glanced at the rev counter. Even Mr. Conservative who never otherwise revvs his engines will regularly take the DDiS 125 beyond 3,500 - 4,000 rpm. I was surprised as to how easily I reached high RPMs in the city without even driving too hard. Your rpm needle will always be higher than the 4-cylinder hatchbacks around you.

High rpm love notwithstanding, the DDiS has absolutely nothing at the top-end of the powerband. Expressway running? There's only one way to say it: Stay out of the fast lane. The Celerio diesel's power to weight ratio is a paltry 53 BHP / ton. That's the same as the Nano Twist & Beat Diesel, but lesser than the Alto 800! For the sake of comparison, Celerio petrol = 83 BHP / ton & Swift diesel = 70 BHP / ton. Progress is very slow after 90 kph. I tested it alone; performance will be even more pedestrian with the family & holiday luggage. If & when you take the Celerio diesel on the highway, you'll have to drive calmly. Overtaking too requires careful planning. I tried to pass an Innova that was doing 80 - 90 kph; the moment I moved to the right lane to overtake him, it was like I hit a wall. Impossible. The 47 horses aren't up to fighting aerodynamic forces at that speed, and the acceleration above 100 kph is agonizingly slow. You will be able to sedately cruise at 90 - 100 kph, but that's all. As per the characteristics mentioned in the previous paragraph, the engine will also be working hard on the highway. You'll frequently take it to the redline (without much progress, I might add). In summary, the Celerio diesel is peppy enough in the city, but slow on the highway. This isn't an inter-city express. End of the day, if you choose this car, remember you bought it for point A -> point B commuting only. Don't expect anything else of it.

The ARAI fuel economy rating is an impressive 27.62 kmpl. There isn't a doubt that the twin-cylinder diesel will be very fuel efficient in the urban cycle. Keep an eye on our ownership reports for real-world fuel economy numbers. On a related note, the fuel tank size is 35 liters.

The gearbox is standard fare. First gear feels a little notchy and takes slightly more effort to engage than the rest, but it's otherwise a reasonably okay gearbox to use. The gates are well defined and I have no real complaints in this area. The Celerio diesel deploys a hydraulic clutch (Celerio petrol = cable operated clutch). It's got good pedal feel. In terms of weight & throw length, it's middle of the way (not too short nor too light).

The Celerio's ride quality is basic yet compliant. On low speeds bumps, you can feel the front end being stiffer than the petrol's. That said, the suspension is never harsh and it tackles road irregularities competently. Rough roads at 50 km/h were handled fairly well for a budget hatchback. Sharp ridges though come through to the cabin easily, sending a jolt to the back. Rear passengers won't complain as long as the road is flat. At speed, the car's rear end can get bouncy on imperfect roads. The base variant should offer a softer ride as it has 13" wheels with taller sidewalls.

The 4.7 meter turning radius makes the Celerio immensely chuckable in Indian traffic conditions. The steering feels distinctly firmer than the petrol's, especially between 0 kph to parking speeds where it's not effortless to turn. The EPS is still light enough for the city, but isn't over-assisted. At speed, the steering weighs up sufficiently. The overall handling & road behaviour are neutral. Body roll on the Celerio is within acceptable limits for a hatch which is on the taller side. It has decent grip, and road manners are as expected of a family hatchback. No nasty surprises here. The behaviour is actually better than you'd expect of a budget Maruti. Even at 100 - 120 km/h, stability is acceptable and she's a lot more composed than the likes of the Alto. The 165 mm of ground clearance cleared all the bumps & roads encountered during my test-drive.

Vertically-mounted intercooler:


Terribly basic engine cover. In contrast, the Celerio petrol has a sweeter one (image link):


The diesel gets an insulation sheet under the hood (Celerio petrol doesn't have one):


You get what you pay for! Unlike the Alto K10, all of the Celerio's wires are properly insulated. You can also see the firewall insulation in this image:


Robust engine mounts (Gypsy has similar ones). To take care of the vibes:


Bigger battery than the Celerio petrol. An unusual location for the ECU, clamped in front of the battery. Looks like a jugaad afterthought:


Top mounted oil filter is so easy to access:


Unique black plastic spill protector (below the fuel cap). No more fuel trickling down after a refill:

Last edited by GTO : 24th July 2015 at 12:43. Reason: Language
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Old 24th June 2015, 02:03   #7
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Listen to the Celerio's 2-cylinder diesel engine in this video:

Last edited by Rehaan : 24th June 2015 at 02:04.
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Old 24th June 2015, 03:13   #8
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Finally the much awaited review is here, that too from GTO, couldn't ask for more.
Hope Maruti creates history with this brave move.
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Old 24th June 2015, 03:27   #9
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

The last video of the engine sound.Horrid!!! It sounds like the piaggio auto rickshaws we had in the suburbs long time back.

However,going by Maruti's reputation,they are sure to refine this engine in later alterations.(as they did with the AMT as well) Personally not really impressed or excited about this excuse of a diesel engine but looking forward to the indigenous 1.2/1.6 ones based on this.

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Old 24th June 2015, 03:54   #10
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
The Maruti Celerio Diesel has been launched in India at a price of between Rs. 4.65 - 5.71 lakhs (ex-Delhi).
The Top end is Priced at 5.86L Ex-SR Delhi as per Maruti's website.

Quote:
• 793 cc engine offers decent driveability. It's also peppy enough for city commutes
I guess 'also' doesn't apply since apparently its primarily meant for city commutes.

Quote:
• Terrific fuel economy. ARAI rating is 27.62 kmpl..
Should we really say so? Since the more powerful eV2 has a claimed mileage of 25kmpl. Link. Thats a 4 cylinder engine churning 70PS across a wider RPM band.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
...Now, we have the 2-cylinder diesel engine making its debut in the Celerio. There is another reason behind the car's choice though. The Celerio brand is only 1.5 years old. Maruti would rather experiment with a newer brand than its older & more established nameplates like the Alto & WagonR. It's risk management 101. See how the AMT made it to the Alto only after getting the seal of approval on the Celerio.

This isn't only Maruti's first diesel engine, but even parent Suzuki's. The Japanese car maker has never developed a diesel engine till date...
To be very honest, I'm abit skeptical about their intentions. A 2 cylinder Diesel is noticeably too small for this car. YET they've launched it. Even a remote posssibility that consumers are being used to test the capability of the Engine is not the most comfortable space to be in.

Sorry if I sound abit negative, but really, IMO a new engine being ~1/2 the size of the competitors tried & tested CR4 workhorse, putting out 2/3rd of the power, could possibly have a chances of working optimally for a shorter duration due to the compression ratio.

Could we have the eV2 column closer to the Left please.

Quote:
...This is the first two-cylinder diesel passenger car in India. Forget two-cylinders, you can count the 3-cylinder diesels on your fingers (Beat, Grand i10, Quanto, Mini Cooper etc.).
Yeah! Also the Polo!

Quote:
The Celerio was the cheapest Maruti AT, and this is the cheapest Maruti diesel. The base LDi variant costs merely 5 lakhs on the road in Delhi. That said, the Rs.75,000 - 80,000 premium over the petrol equivalent is just too much. Let's not forget that it has a cylinder less than its petrol sister & Maruti doesn't have to pay royalties to anyone (like it does with the 1.3L diesel). Then, as we'd mentioned in our earlier Celerio review, the Celerio petrol MT is by itself overpriced. Add the hefty premium that the diesel carries, and it becomes hard to justify a Rs. 6.9 lakh on the road Mumbai price for the ZDi (O) variant with merely 47 BHP on tap! Even the Alto 800 has 47 horses.
Completely +10!

Quote:
Clean & tidy underbody. 35 liter plastic fuel tank is located under the rear seat:
165mm GC for a car thats primarily meant for city! Moreover the plastic fuel tank! Reminds me of those Volvo busses catching fire after their plastic fuel tanks burst & set the bus ablaze after a crash! Anyway, sorry for going to extremes!

Quote:
...The 165 mm of ground clearance cleared all the bumps & roads encountered during my test-drive...
If I may ask, where'd you'll have majority of the test drive?
Since my Linea had the same 165mm GC & I had doubts about how this would fare with 4 occupants even with a short wheelbase.

Quote:
Two parting shots. Our test car had the chrome accessory kit slapped on. You can see the chrome foglamp surround...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
User-friendly, straightforward dashboard. Notice something different? Our test Celerio had black faux wood inserts around the center console, gear lever and door armrest areas (earlier silver):...

Illuminated scuff plates, another accessory on our test car:
Would the ZXi(O) have these as standard fitments? If not, then IMHO this should not be presented to readers as part of the posts that form part of the official review.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
The main & spare keys are the same. Many manufacturers give you a bare-bone spare key (without any buttons):
Such a High premium & no flippy key!

Quote:
The Celerio's ICE comes with a remote control! The Safari Storme we tested last week costs thrice as much, but doesn't get one:
No Sirji, the Storme infact DOES come with a remote control! I remember one of the post where a member shared a pic of a Large sized remote.

Quote:
Spare is a standard steel wheel:
For the premium, it would've been great if it was an Alloy IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
• Compression ratio: 15.1.
...
• Because the engine is always working at a higher rpm than usual (details in the driving post), I have concerns about its wear and tear rate.
Same here, would be great to know the relative significance & importance of the Compression Ratio.

Quote:
Moderator MPower says that it appears to be a low cost fuel-injection system that strikes a suitable compromise between the hi-tech but pricey common-rail and the old school distributor-pump DI system. The DDiS does away with the common rail and seems to feed pressurized diesel from the pump to the cylinders via some kind of block.
I guess the CRDi system considered more advanced, & maybe Maruti should've developed this engine better.

Quote:
• Maruti has put the DDiS 125 through 4+ lakh kms of testing.
Quite reassuring, this.

Quote:
• This 0.8L could be the daddy of an upcoming family of diesels. While Maruti denies it, rumour mills insist that 1.2L (same engine with one more cylinder) and 1.6L (with double the cylinders) versions are in the pipeline.
Brilliant! Hope they develop the engine further though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
...What about the highway then? It's a mild hum at 100 kph. At 120 kph, wind noise is more than that of the engine...
lol

Quote:
As you accelerate, you feel a mild turbo boost and the mid-range is where the action is, but it's short-lived. The engine has quite a narrow power band, primarily due to the empty top end (more on that later). The punch is quickly over. The max that the engine revvs to is 4,900 rpm and to give you an idea of the gearing, here are the max speeds in the initial lot: 38 kph (1st), 68 kph (2nd) and 102 kph (3rd). What you will notice is that the engine is always running at a higher rpm than usual. Reason? Because of its small displacement & resultant short gearing, it has to work much harder than the 1.3 - 1.5L diesels that we're accustomed to. For instance, 1st gear at 30 kph sees the engine spinning at 3,800 rpm! 5th gear @ 100 kph is seen at 3,000 rpm (Swift diesel = 2,300 rpm). At 120 kph, the needle is hovering at 3,500 rpm. In nearly all driving situations, the engine was 750 - 1,000 rpm higher than I thought it would be, before I glanced at the rev counter. Even Mr. Conservative who never otherwise revvs his engines will regularly take the DDiS 125 beyond 3,500 - 4,000 rpm. I was surprised as to how easily I'm reaching high rpms in the city without even driving too hard. Your rpm needle will always be higher than the 4-cylinder hatchbacks around you.
Such high RPM's could have an effect on engine life. Whats the recommended Service Interval? Hope its shortened compared to the usual 10,000kms.

In these modern times where diesel engines are designed to withstand through a fairly long life, this could have quite a bearing. Moreso, a person choosing this Diesel over a petrol paying a healthy premium, may feel that it needs to run long enough to ensure it justifies the premium.

Quote:
...The ARAI fuel economy rating is an impressive 27.62 kmpl. There isn't a doubt that the twin-cylinder diesel will be very fuel efficient in the urban cycle. Keep an eye on our ownership reports for real-world fuel economy numbers.
They better be close to the claimed figure. How much did you'll get during the test drive ?

Quote:
It has decent grip, and road manners are as expected of a family hatchback. No nasty surprises here.
This sentence/description I didn't understand only.

Thanks in advance!

Overall, Bombastic Review!

(That 5-Star rating button isn't working.)

Night 2:30 you'll work! Salute to the dedication!

Last edited by Rehaan : 24th June 2015 at 15:55. Reason: Any idea why the smileys in this post were inserted as images? This causes issues with our mobile skin...
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Old 24th June 2015, 04:15   #11
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Thumbs down Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by saion666 View Post
The last video of the engine sound.Horrid!!! It sounds like the piaggio auto rickshaws we had in the suburbs long time back.
The good ol' days of my college!!! Man, this is nostalgic- anyone who has been to the those shared piaggio auto rickshaws will relate to this engine sound- the only difference being auto drivers used to pull the driver seat up and the use a cord to wind around the engine to start it and this newest car starts with a key.
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Old 24th June 2015, 06:13   #12
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Excellent review as always!

WHAT makes them charge premium over the petrol version? This horrid sounding diesel? I always thought that Maruti overprices their car. Their cars are good in reliability, no doubt but this 2 cylinder putter should hit back hard on them.

My take on ARAI 27 kmpl is they should be sued! My Tata Nano with 23kmpl LAB claimed mileage hardly returns 15-16 in city which is acceptable. What is not acceptable is ARAI allowing manufacturers to sell cars on the basis of mileage figures obtained in lab, this entity (mileage) should be based on real roadtest conditions.
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Old 24th June 2015, 07:13   #13
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

6.9 lakhs on road in Mumbai for the top variant? A little more and you can get middle variants of some 1.3 mjd cars. For record, my Punto Dynamic costed me exactly same in 2013. I am sure Grand i10 variants too wont be very far away?

What makes Maruti think that they can get away with this sort of premium on an already overpriced car?

Nice review GTO. Going through, I get a feeling that the only USP perhaps is that this is the smallest Diesel engine. Not sure how it translates to the customers though. Probably the 27 Kmpl mileage might pull in some customers. I dont know. All I can say is very optimistic pricing for a car that has an engine which sounds apt for an auto rickshaw.
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Old 24th June 2015, 07:47   #14
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Great review of a terrible car. Guess it takes all types to make this world, but I really hope this car is a super flop. It's bad enough having crap CVs like the Ace and Mahindra's equivalent which are slow and noisy on the road - having private cars of this nature will makes our streets even more intolerable.
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Old 24th June 2015, 08:00   #15
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Default Re: Maruti Celerio Diesel : Official Review

Stellar review but the Celerio Diesel is far from convincing.

This car can work well in packed city traffic or in remote places. And an AMT will be a great addition. But, as noted in the review, the car will fall short elsewhere.

In a way, I am glad MSIL chose to develop a Diesel engine in house. Much needed! But they should have picked a 3 pot configuration at least and should have plonked it into a CV first as rumored earlier.

MSIL is not making much noise on the car and taking a waiting approach I think. I don't know how the mass market is reacting to this launch. Will be interesting to see the sales report maybe 6 months from now.
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