Go Back   Team-BHP > BHP India > Team-BHP Reviews > Official New Car Reviews


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 3rd May 2016, 10:54   #1051
BHPian
 
chetans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pune
Posts: 221
Thanked: 68 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by nivatakavacha View Post
Have you faced this situation before? Please let us know. I don't know if this is a problem but would like some clarity on this thing.
My relative was driving the tank for first time and he braked and accelerated at same time.
That caused the rear wheel to spin. This was on flat ground.

I did a very small ghat run and didnt face this issue. Always used handbrake when stopped on inclines.
chetans is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 3rd May 2016, 19:46   #1052
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Chennai
Posts: 32
Thanked: 52 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by nivatakavacha View Post
Hi all TUV300 owners,

I am now seriously considering the TUV300 as my next car and I am reading up as much information as I can on the web. ...
(Rear wheel spinning continuously when TUV300 tries to turn up an incline.)

Have you faced this situation before? Please let us know. I don't know if this is a problem but would like some clarity on this thing.

Thanks in advance!
Hello Nivatakavacha, I face this on a daily basis, this usually happens when you take sharp turn on to an incline. Our home parking lot is above the street level by about 2 ft and our street is just 16 ft wide, so quite literally I take a 90 degree left turn on to our parking incline and the left rear wheel invariably spins.

This is because TUV has a RWD with no locking differential, so while taking such sharp turns on to an incline one of the rear wheel becomes air borne and due to the lack of locking diff, the air borne tends to spin. Solution is to hack the RWD mechanism and install a locking diff or back out a bit and adjust the turning circle such that the rear wheel does not become air borne. (I do this on a daily basis). BTW this happens with most rear wheel drive vehicles that have dared to climb our home such as Scorpio (old & new), Innova, Enjoy. In the case of FWD, this happens when backing in to such inclines.

Hope Mahindra adds a diff lock to address such practical difficulties.
sathyasuri is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 08:03   #1053
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Chennai
Posts: 32
Thanked: 52 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

I meant the limited slip differential when I said diff lock in my previous post above.
sathyasuri is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 08:53   #1054
BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Chennai
Posts: 139
Thanked: 356 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by sathyasuri View Post

Hope Mahindra adds a diff lock to address such practical difficulties.


Thank you so much for your response Sathyasuri. I went on the web and learnt all about the various forms of differentials last night. I learnt a lot last night.

I too have a similar parking predicament. The road leading to my house is narrow and the apartment parking is about 2 feet above road level, so I will face the same situation like you.

So my question to you is whether the open differential on TUV300 is liveable with or not? Since you face the problem everyday, how do you deal with it? Is it too much of a hassle or do you have a hack for it?

In other words, is the car worth the problem? Have you faced this issue in any other places like malls etc (where inclination is steep for parking lot)

Thank you so much!

Slightly off-topic but I found this interesting video on differentials and think it will help other BHPians understand this issue, hence posting it here:


Last edited by nivatakavacha : 4th May 2016 at 08:58. Reason: adding video
nivatakavacha is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 10:58   #1055
BHPian
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 264
Thanked: 325 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by nivatakavacha View Post


I too have a similar parking predicament. The road leading to my house is narrow and the apartment parking is about 2 feet above road level, so I will face the same situation like you.
This problem could come on any vehicles that are mass production in nature. The suspension system is built for general utility and not 'for all terrain'! In case of differential the advantage would be the wheel would not spin, however it could still be air borne. To avoid air borne you may end-up with a modified suspension system.

I guess you should not be worried too much on this. On couple of moving IN and OUT of your parking lot, you would have clear idea how to avoid the situation and move the vehicle accordingly.
LoneRidder is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 11:59   #1056
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Chennai
Posts: 32
Thanked: 52 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by nivatakavacha View Post

... I too have a similar parking predicament. The road leading to my house is narrow and the apartment parking is about 2 feet above road level, so I will face the same situation like you.

So my question to you is whether the open differential on TUV300 is liveable with or not? Since you face the problem everyday, how do you deal with it? Is it too much of a hassle or do you have a hack for it?

In other words, is the car worth the problem? Have you faced this issue in any other places like malls etc (where inclination is steep for parking lot)

Thank you so much!
Hi Nivatakavacha,
As LoneRidder has mentioned below, such a problem would occur in most RWD vehicles with no Limited Slip diff. Is it livable, definitely yes, at least, in my case I am used to it. I used to have a WagonR k10 prior to this, while it would climb up without the wheel spin drama, I had to be careful enough not scrape the underbody. I had TDed S-cross & Ertiga also before going for the TUV in both the cases I asked the Sales Consultant (SC) himself to try to negotiate the turn just to make sure it would climb and that I dont damage the TD vehicles. In both the cases, the SCs under estimated (or should I say over confident about ?) the tight inclined turn and both scraped the underbody, S-Cross scraped under the front left door while the Ertiga grounded below the rear left door. So I guess eventually it boils down to the driver to be cautious and prudent in judging such manoeuvres.
I take two approaches depending on the way the other vehicles in the street are parked if there is vehicle parked near the place where I take the left turn, I would go past our house's gate and then reverse to make the vehicle perpendicular to the ramp (the sub 4m dimension of TUV really helps!) and simply climb the ramp with just the idling torque, this is my usual approach. But if there is a vehicle parked past our gate then I would take the left turn directly, climb the ramp, then back down a bit and repeat couple of times this back and forth movement to bring the vehicle as perpendicular as possible to the ramp and then again climb the ramp using the idling torque (trust me, this is one place where you will appreciate TUV's low end torque.

Apart from this I have not faced a problem elsewhere. I guess (as also said by Loneridder), you just get simply trained automatically after a couple of times and you will automatically judge such turns and would manoueuvre the vehicle in such a way that you totally avoid such scenarios.Cheers

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoneRidder View Post
This problem could come on any vehicles that are mass production in nature. The suspension system is built for general utility and not 'for all terrain'! In case of differential the advantage would be the wheel would not spin, however it could still be air borne. To avoid air borne you may end-up with a modified suspension system.

I guess you should not be worried too much on this. On couple of moving IN and OUT of your parking lot, you would have clear idea how to avoid the situation and move the vehicle accordingly.
sathyasuri is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 13:34   #1057
BHPian
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Chennai
Posts: 139
Thanked: 356 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by sathyasuri View Post
Hi Nivatakavacha,
As LoneRidder has mentioned below, such a problem would occur in most RWD vehicles with no Limited Slip diff. Is it livable, definitely yes, at least, in my case I am used to it. I used to have a WagonR k10 prior to this, while it would climb up without the wheel spin drama, I had to be careful enough not scrape the underbody. I had TDed S-cross & Ertiga also before going for the TUV in both the cases I asked the Sales Consultant (SC) himself to try to negotiate the turn just to make sure it would climb and that I dont damage the TD vehicles. In both the cases, the SCs under estimated (or should I say over confident about ?) the tight inclined turn and both scraped the underbody, S-Cross scraped under the front left door while the Ertiga grounded below the rear left door. So I guess eventually it boils down to the driver to be cautious and prudent in judging such manoeuvres.
I take two approaches depending on the way the other vehicles in the street are parked if there is vehicle parked near the place where I take the left turn, I would go past our house's gate and then reverse to make the vehicle perpendicular to the ramp (the sub 4m dimension of TUV really helps!) and simply climb the ramp with just the idling torque, this is my usual approach. But if there is a vehicle parked past our gate then I would take the left turn directly, climb the ramp, then back down a bit and repeat couple of times this back and forth movement to bring the vehicle as perpendicular as possible to the ramp and then again climb the ramp using the idling torque (trust me, this is one place where you will appreciate TUV's low end torque.

Apart from this I have not faced a problem elsewhere. I guess (as also said by Loneridder), you just get simply trained automatically after a couple of times and you will automatically judge such turns and would manoueuvre the vehicle in such a way that you totally avoid such scenarios.Cheers
Thank you so much Sathya for your comment. I think I will first take the TUV300 home and check how it performs. Your comment along with Loneridder's have put my mind at ease. Thanks!!!!!
nivatakavacha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 19:11   #1058
BHPian
 
PrideRed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: BLR/PTR
Posts: 642
Thanked: 847 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by nivatakavacha View Post


Slightly off-topic but I found this interesting video on differentials and think it will help other BHPians understand this issue, hence posting it here:

I witnessed a scenario exactly as mentioned in the video. There is a TUV in my apartment and it came into a situation where left rear wheel was grounded but right rear wheel was on air. The driver went on pressing the accelerator but the car wouldn't move. The right rear wheel kept on rotating while the other wheel did not move at all. The car had to be pushed by 3 people to bring out of the deadlock. Nice informative video .
PrideRed is online now   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 4th May 2016, 22:34   #1059
BHPian
 
ezee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Gurgaon
Posts: 192
Thanked: 191 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrideRed View Post
I witnessed a scenario exactly as mentioned in the video. There is a TUV in my apartment and it came into a situation where left rear wheel was grounded but right rear wheel was on air. The driver went on pressing the accelerator but the car wouldn't move. The right rear wheel kept on rotating while the other wheel did not move at all. The car had to be pushed by 3 people to bring out of the deadlock. Nice informative video .
I too have gone through same situation when due to uneven surface suddenly my rear left wheel went airborne. I tried pressing A pedal but nothing was happening. A possible solution was to make someone sit at that end but unfortunately i was alone so no options left, i alone pushed the TUV down to road. So all TUV 300 owners beware of any such possible situation.
ezee is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 6th May 2016, 00:35   #1060
BHPian
 
chetans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pune
Posts: 221
Thanked: 68 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by ezee View Post
Bad days are not yet over!
No doubt that you are unhappy because of all these issues.
Please post a direct tweeter message to #MahindraTUV300.

Lets hope that mahindras are all ears.
chetans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2016, 16:00   #1061
Senior - BHPian
 
AutoIndian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: PCMC, Pune-MH14
Posts: 2,866
Thanked: 3,344 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

Today while doing the weekly ritual of cleaning the car, thought of taking a sneak peek under the hood to check the coolant level. The level is tad below the minimum level mark. When I tried to open the coolant reservoir cap with both hands, it came off easily, as if it was not completely tightened. I also observed the coolant precipitate (white powdery deposits) on the threads. It seems when the engine was running very hot, the coolant must be boiling and the vapors might have tried to evaporate/escape through the loose cap. Later on after cooling it got condensed and precipitate got deposited on the reservoir cap.

Refer the red encircled portion in the below picture also note the coolant vapors/bubbles inside the reservoir
Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review-img_20160507_134842.jpg

The purple coolant below the minimum level mark
Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review-img_20160507_134902.jpg

Last edited by AutoIndian : 7th May 2016 at 16:01.
AutoIndian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2016, 16:47   #1062
BHPian
 
ezee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Gurgaon
Posts: 192
Thanked: 191 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AutoIndian View Post
Today while doing the weekly ritual of cleaning the car, thought of taking a sneak peek under the hood to check the coolant level. The level is tad below the minimum level mark. When I tried to open the coolant reservoir cap with both hands, it came off easily, as if it was not completely tightened. I also observed the coolant precipitate (white powdery deposits) on the threads. It seems when the engine was running very hot, the coolant must be boiling and the vapors might have tried to evaporate/escape through the loose cap. Later on after cooling it got condensed and precipitate got deposited on the reservoir cap.

Refer the red encircled portion in the below picture also note the coolant vapors/bubbles inside the reservoir
Attachment 1504917

The purple coolant below the minimum level mark
Attachment 1504918
In my TUV coolant level has gone below half mark in just 1500 km. When I asked service engineer about this he said its normal.

I have noticed that coolant reaches 100c within first few kms only (through obd2 adapter). May be over boiling is making coolant evaporating quickly. Not sure if its normal.

In my earlier Logan with 60000 kms on the clock, I filled coolant twice only.

Last edited by GTO : 9th May 2016 at 11:30. Reason: Language
ezee is offline   Reply With Quote Received Infraction
Old 7th May 2016, 17:17   #1063
Senior - BHPian
 
AutoIndian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: PCMC, Pune-MH14
Posts: 2,866
Thanked: 3,344 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

We will have to keep it observing. 100c is the boiling point for normal water under atmospheric pressure. As per the owner's manual that is a safe operating range (4 bars on temperature gauge on the dashboard). If the temperature reaches 110c, all the 8 bars lit up. If it reaches 119c, then the temperature warning lamp also lights up. Refer the highlighted portion in the manual snapshot below.

Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review-temperature-gauge.jpg

Quote:
In my earlier Logan run of 60000 km i filled coolant twice only.
Same was the case with my 1.5 lac km run Indica. Between the coolant change intervals of 40K kms, I rarely used to top it up.

Last edited by GTO : 9th May 2016 at 11:31. Reason: Quoted post edited
AutoIndian is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 8th May 2016, 14:05   #1064
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: bangalore
Posts: 276
Thanked: 126 Times
Default Re: Mahindra TUV300 : Official Review

According to autopunditz, TUV300 sold 1928 units in April 2016. Now that is a very sharp fall in numbers.
needforspeed88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th May 2016, 14:57   #1065
BHPian
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Chandigarh
Posts: 97
Thanked: 86 Times
Default

Are any of the add-ons that were on the TUV300 Endurance version showcased at the Auto Expo available for purchase from Mahindra or even a third-party.
rdst_1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mahindra Reva e2o : Official Review Rehaan Official New Car Reviews 435 1st December 2016 13:49
Mahindra Quanto : Official Review GTO Official New Car Reviews 283 12th September 2016 11:46
Mahindra TUV300 Ownership Review - A Tank to tame the road! CAPTAIN REX Test-Drives & Initial Ownership Reports 110 10th March 2016 13:23
Next-generation Mahindra Bolero? NAMED: Mahindra TUV300! EDIT: Now launched at Rs. 6.90 lakhs Aditya The Indian Car Scene 1171 28th October 2015 11:35


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 23:27.

Copyright 2000 - 2016, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks