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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #1
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Default Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

The Mahindra XUV500 Automatic has been launched in India at a price of between Rs. 15.53 - 17.37 lakhs (ex-Delhi).

What you’ll like:

• 6-speed AT is smooth & capable. Superbly mated to the mHawk diesel
• Available with AWD & in the fully loaded variant (unlike the Hyundai Creta)
• Well-engineered, contemporary SUV with a value-for-money price tag
• Acres of space on the 1st & 2nd seat rows
• Competent engine delivers fantastic driveability & highway performance
• Balanced ride & handling package
• Safety kit includes 6 airbags, ESP with rollover mitigation, ABS + EBD and all-wheel disc brakes
• Expansive feature list (sunroof, touchscreen ICE, powered driver's seat, cruise control etc.)

What you won’t:

• Absolutely no luggage capacity with all the seats in place
• Cramped 3rd seat row is best suited to children only. A sliding middle row is sorely missed
• Ordinary interior quality. Still has a lot of scope for improvement
• Niggles & issues, as reported by existing XUV500 owners
• Mahindra's inconsistent sales & service experiences

This review has been jointly compiled with GTO. Thanks to him for the expert observations!

Last edited by GTO : 15th July 2016 at 17:00. Reason: Keyless entry & go now available on the AT
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #2
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Since the Mahindra XUV500 has already been reviewed by Team-BHP, this report will only focus on changes to the Automatic variant. For easy reference, here are direct links to the complete road-tests:

Full Road-Test

The 2015 Facelift


Last edited by GTO : 23rd December 2015 at 16:08.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #3
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The Mahindra XUV500's launch was something of a Concorde moment for an Indian automobile manufacturer. The SUV came with an imposing road presence, a robust & torque loaded engine, spacious cabin and a feature list to make that owner's manual overweight. Such was the popularity of the XUV500 that it was chosen as the 2011 Team-BHP Car of the Year (link) with a staggering 57% of the votes. The XUV500's sales performance has been equally impressive. From the time of its launch, the SUV has sold ~150,000 copies, while its sales average in 2015 has been 3,149 units / month.

That said, the missing automatic gearbox has always been its Achilles heel. Customers in the Rs. 15 lakh & above segments simply prefer automatics - that's an accepted market trend. Matters weren't helped by the XUV500 MT's long clutch & gearshift travel. While Mahindra's flagship got a facelift earlier this year with some design & feature updates, a slushbox was nowhere in sight.

Now, 4 years after the original debut, it is finally being offered with an automatic gearbox. There's no doubt that Mahindra has taken wayyy too long to bring the AT variant, but well, better late than never. The transmission chosen is the 2nd generation 6-speed AT from Japan's Aisin Seiki.

The XUV500 AT surely enjoys a USP or two. In this price band, if you desire a 7-seater AT with AWD, there simply isn't any direct competitor. You can get an AT (5-seater Creta) or AWD (5-seater Duster), but not both. Yep, there is Mahindra's own Scorpio with a price tag that's lower by ~3 lakhs, 3 rows of seats and a proper low-range 4x4 system, but it isn't as modern or car-like to drive as the monocoque XUV500, Creta & Duster.

Variant-to-variant, the XUV500 AT commands a premium of approximately 1 lakh rupees over its manual counterparts. This is standard fare and about the same amount that Hyundai charges for the Creta's AT variant. However, Hyundai only offers the Creta AT in the SX+ trim which misses out on a lot of features from the top-end SX(O). The Creta is also a size smaller than the XUV500. If you have to choose between the two, go for the XUV500 if you want the size, 7-seats and features. Additionally, it can be equipped with AWD. On the other hand, if you desire sedan-like driveability and maneuverability, a city-friendly footprint, safer long term reliability and stellar after-sales service, the sedan-like Creta will be the better option.

The XUV500 AT is offered in three variants i.e. the W8 (FWD only) along with the W10 FWD & W10 AWD.

Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review-mahindra-xuv500-specifications-price.png

So, what's new on the outside?

The XUV500 received a facelift earlier this year (link to full list of changes):


The rear looks no different from the MT, except for one small addition...


...the "automatic" badge:


Just one difference on the side as well...


...the XUV500 AT isn't offered with passive keyless entry on any variant, which is why you don't get a request button on the paw type door handle like the MT . Quite a shocking move - there was no reason to remove this nice-to-have feature that an owner would use on a daily basis! Keyless entry & go are so convenient & they will be sorely missed by owners!


Standard guard underneath. Good thing that the imported AT gearbox isn't lying exposed:

Last edited by GTO : 23rd December 2015 at 16:18.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #4
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So, what's new on the inside?

Dashboard with the black-beige interior theme from the facelift. Ambience is good, part quality is ordinary:


Steering wheel is identical to the one in the MT. No paddle-shifters:


Tachometer has been optimistically marked till 7,000 rpm - the AT doesn't let the engine rev to even 4,000 rpm!!


MID displays the gear shifter's position. While driving, if you want to know the actual gear that the AT gearbox is running in, shift the gear lever to the left (into manual mode). This display will then show you the currently engaged gear number. You can then move the shifter back to 'D':


In 'M' mode, your upshift or downshift command is acknowledged with a blink of the gear readout (the gear number will blink, followed by the upshift / downshift). If you want a shift that the gearbox doesn't agree with, the number will still flash, but with no corresponding change in gear:


No engine start button for the AT . Illuminated key ring for the ignition. You can't remove the key from the ignition unless the gear lever is in 'P':


Same cheap, long & ugly key. W10 MT owners get a cooler looking smartkey (link to image):


Spacious footwell with a wider brake pedal:


The dead pedal really needs to be wider, especially in the AT where it will be used 100% of the time. Anyone with even a size 10 shoe will find it to be too narrow. Doesn't support the entire foot. Now that there's so much space in the footwell, why didn't Mahindra think of this?


Standard P-R-N-D gear lever. Gated shift pattern means no 'safety unlock' button. Excessive silver & chrome looks tacky. Interestingly, the gear labelling & gate design are for a left-hand-drive car. For RHD cars, the gear markings & gating are different, like in the Fortuner AT (link to image):


Zooming in on the small manual mode toggle switch (on the side of the gear lever). Push forward to upshift & vice versa. Too small & unergonomic. It only works when the gear lever is pushed to the left into manual mode. No effect when in 'D':


The "Shift Lock Release" button. Pressing this button bypasses the gear lock system. Use the shift lock button when you park on an incline and can’t move the lever out of 'P'. The feature could also be used when towing the vehicle:


Fitment quality is poor, attention to detail is missing. This black & silver panel kept coming loose during our drive. Whatever we tried, it wouldn't fit in perfectly. On a drive from Mumbai - Khopoli & back, it came off at least 5 times!


Center console misses the engine start button of the W10 MT:


Thankfully, no annoying micro-hybrid (engine idling start / stop) system in the automatic. Hill descent control is there (lower left button), along with hill hold control (to prevent rollback on an incline):

Last edited by GTO : 6th January 2016 at 15:28.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #5
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The Aisin 6-speed torque-converter AT



Before we deep dive into the driving experience, let's look at some information on the gearbox itself.

• 6-speed AT is fully imported.

• Mahindra states that the XUV500 AT weighs merely 5 kgs more than the equivalent MT variant.

• It's the same gearbox used in the SsangYong Tivoli (link), albeit with a smaller 1.6L / 113 BHP diesel. If it weren't for SsangYong, Mahindra would've never gotten their hands on this transmission.

• Contrary to what some reports suggested, the XUV500 has NEVER been offered with an automatic in ANY market until now. This is the first XUV500 AT. To dispel another rumour, this is NOT the gearbox used in the Scorpio AT. Mahindra says that the Scorpio AT uses a gearbox sourced from DSI, Australia.

• The transmission control unit (TCU) calculates gear changes based on 3 main factors - throttle input, engine management system (EMS) and ESP.

• Transmission fluid has been filled for life, keeping servicing costs down. Unless there is any damage (say, external impact), there's no need to open up the gearbox during routine maintenance visits.

• Mahindra states that the AT is equipped with "two uphill climbing modes". These aren't two user-selectable modes, no. They're a set of sensors that detect medium or sharp gradients, making the gearbox hold onto a shorter gear for longer & prevent unwanted upshifts.

• 5th & 6th are overdrive gears. You'll usually see these being engaged at 70 & 80 kph (respectively).

• As you'll read in the driving report below, Mahindra has gotten the gear ratios spot on! The XUV500 AT is competent in the city as well as on the highway.

• Gearbox has only one driving mode - 'D'. No sport mode, no 'L' mode, nothing. It'll be interesting to see how the XUV500 AT behaves in harsh conditions & on rough terrain. We look forward to the ownership reports.

• Compared to the MT, the AT loses the smart alternator system & idling start / stop functionality.

• The XUV500 AT has an ARAI rated fuel efficiency of 13.85 km/l compared to the manual's 16 km/l.

• Since this is a new gearbox for Mahindra, we strongly recommend taking the maximum extended warranty package available on the XUV500 (5 years / 120,000 kms).

Last edited by GTO : 3rd January 2016 at 18:03.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #6
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The proven 2.2L mHawk torque churner makes 140 BHP @ 3,750 rpm and 330 Nm of torque @ 1,600-2,800 rpm i.e. the same state of tune as the manual:


No dual clutches or any cutting edge technology here. This 6-speed torque-converter AT uses a tried & tested old-school design with 6 gears giving it a better spread of gear ratios and calm cruising ability. The gearbox is alright, but it's the excellent 2.2L engine that hides the AT's deficiencies. This mHawk is a jewel of a motor and its ready torque makes the gearbox look better than it actually is. It's the same situation with the Fortuner 3.0L AT too. Paired to smaller engines (say, a 1.5L petrol), these ATs would be unimpressive.

The biggest advantage of the XUV500's AT variant is that you no longer have to deal with the MT's long throw clutch & gearshift (the latter is notchy too). As if to make things better, the tall AT gear lever is positioned such that you can move it between the different driving modes while still resting your hand on the center armrest.

The XUV500 AT starts off in 'P' & 'N' only. Try twisting the key in any other gear and the engine won't turnover, with no display prompt coming up on the MID telling you to switch to 'P' or 'N'. The brake pedal doesn't need to be pressed to fire up the SUV, although you do need to press it to move the lever out of the 'Park' position. Not applicable to 'N' though - in fact, you can freely slide the gear lever between 'N' & 'D' even at 60 km/h!!!

Take your foot off the brake pedal and the XUV500 AT will crawl forward at a speed of ~5 km/h. This crawling is useful as you can conveniently drive in bumper-to-bumper traffic with just one pedal (the brake). As is the case with torque converter ATs, accelerating off from a standstill is smooth & seamless. Throttle response is good and, thanks to the 330 Nm of torque, there is no sluggishness felt at all. Drive calmly with a light foot in the city and shifts usually take place between 1,600 - 1,800 rpm. The conservative gearbox is eager to move up and the early shifts keep engine noise to a bare minimum in the city. The upshift quality is very smooth and devoid of any jerkiness. Throttle response is satisfactory even on the move and you'll easily make your way around the city. The XUV500 AT feels peppy as you increase your throttle input. On the flip side, you'll surely feel the downshifts when coasting or slowing down with very light braking. This is felt all the more when the gearbox is shifting to lower gears (e.g. to 3rd). No, it isn't noticeable when you are slowing down with the brake pedal pressed properly, and is felt mainly while coasting. The gear engaging action in these downshifts should have been less aggressive.

The XUV500 MT is a quick SUV and the AT variant is no different. Press the A-pedal hard in the initial lot of gears and you'll experience that classic XUV500 torque steer - watch out for it. On the open road, the AT effortlessly accelerates to 120 km/h and can drive at three digit speeds all day long on the expressway. Keep the accelerator pinned and she'll change from 1st to 2nd gear at ~3,900 rpm. Subsequent upshifts take place at 3,750 rpm, then 3,600 rpm - the gearbox won't over-revv the engine. In fact, no matter what we tried, we weren't able to take the revv counter over 4,000 rpm, unlike the MT variant that revvs to 4,800 rpm. The kickdown response time while overtaking is acceptable at around half a second. It helps that you're towering above the other sedans & hatchbacks on the road, thus enjoying a clear view of the road ahead.

The 2.2L engine makes light work of overtaking. However, the gearbox's conservative tuning means it'll sometimes drop one gear when ideally, it should have dropped two. The engine's grunt makes up and the problem isn't serious, but there are many situations where you'll wish for a more aggressive choice of gear to make the overtaking faster. Solution = preparing the car before the overtaking move using 'M' or manual mode (covered in the next paragraph). In terms of long distance cruising ability, few SUVs can match the XUV500 AT. The 6th gear ratio makes for relaxed mile munching - 100 km/h is seen at merely 1,700 rpm and 120 km/h at just above 2,000 rpm. This calm cruisability, along with the composed ride quality & high speed stability, make the XUV500 a superior highway companion, compared to the likes of the bumpy, noisy Fortuner.

To engage manual mode, you have to move the gear lever to the left and slide the toggle switch forward for upshifts (and vice versa). The manual-mode button is too small, very unergonomic to operate, and because of the placement of the gear lever in manual mode with regard to the tall armrest, using the shifter toggle is quite wrist straining. Moving the entire gear lever up or down (like the Creta) for shifting would be a far better option. The XUV500's AT gearbox honestly does a fair job in most conditions and you'll seldom need to use manual mode. The only two driving conditions are when you want additional engine braking, or if you're overtaking on a two-lane highway. Here, manual mode can help by allowing you to downshift and prepare the car for overtaking before you move out of your lane. Note: hitting the manual mode toggle switch with the lever in 'D' yields no response - you have to shift the lever to the left.

Once you're done with manual mode, be sure to move the gear lever back to 'D' because, in manual mode, the AT is waiting for your input (unless the revs go too high or drop too low). As an example, I was in manual mode @ 110 km/h in 6th gear and wanted to go for an overtake. Slamming down the pedal would not result in a downshift and it just kept building up the revs at a slower pace. Slip it into 'D' and the gearbox will automatically downshift on kickdown. When driving in manual mode, your upshift or downshift command is acknowledged with a blink on the MID (the current gear reading will blink, and then change). If you want a shift that the gearbox doesn't agree with, the number will just flash, with no corresponding gear change. At a standstill in manual mode, you cannot start at anything higher than 3rd gear. Tip: if you are driving in 'D' and want to know what gear you're currently in, move the lever to the left and you'll see a numeric readout of the engaged gear.

In terms of NVH, the XUV500 AT is overall sorted, except for two situations. Say you're at a standstill at a traffic light with the gear lever in 'D' and the brake pedal pressed. Here, there is a prominent amount of vibration felt on the steering wheel. This is incredibly annoying! Your only solution is to move the gear lever into 'P' mode where the vibration levels go down. It's one of those things that is typical of Mahindra - they won't get it right at launch, but will hopefully solve it after customer complaints. Speaking of which, we have another one. While cruising on the expressway at 120 km/h, tyre noise was significant from the Bridgestone Duelers. Cruising at 120 km/h in 6th gear, the engine is inaudible and relaxed, but a lot of road noise filters through.

It's a good thing that Mahindra has improved the XUV500's brakes over the years. After all, the AT needs competent braking hardware. The all-round disc brakes offer sufficient stopping performance and brake sensitivity is noticeably better than it is in the manual, without that delay we saw in the manual. No nervous moments with the XUV500 AT. That said, like the MT variant, nose dive under braking is on the higher side. In all other areas of on-road behaviour (ride quality, handling etc.), the XUV500 AT is just as talented as its MT sibling.

On the fully-loaded W10 variant, Mahindra offers an optional AWD system. If you intend to tour the country or need to frequently access remote areas, the AWD is highly recommended. Though the autobox offers a great deal of convenience, the MT will have an edge in off-road performance because it'll allow delicate co-ordination between the clutch <-> brake <-> accelerator. Manually choosing the gear also has an advantage in tricky situations. Moderator Anshuman frequently goes road-tripping in his XUV500 AWD and he speaks highly of it. No, the XUV500 will never be a true mountain goat like the Thar 4x4, yet it is capable enough for leisure touring purposes. If you're sitting on the fence between the FWD & AWD variants, be sure to read this awesome thread.

Last edited by GTO : 24th December 2015 at 12:31.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:01   #7
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An Owner's Perspective

The other day Tushar pinged me and in <24 hours, I got a chance to drive the newly launched Automatic Transmission (AT) version of the XUV5OO for about 30 minutes. It was the W10 FWD Automatic. Since the XUV5OO facelift has already been discussed in detail, I would restrict my observations to just the differences from the Manual Transmission (MT) version.
  • Besides the 'Automatic' badge on the rear and the missing request sensor on the front door(s), there are no other differences on the outside.
  • Inside, in the driver side footwell, the clutch pedal is missing (obviously) and the brake pedal is extra large - just like any other Automatic car. With the absence of the clutch pedal, there is a fairly large amount of space available in the footwell which ideally should have been utilized for a bigger and more convenient dead pedal. Somehow M&M didn't think so.
  • Unlike the MT version (where all 3 pedals are at a different height from the floor), the 2 pedals in the automatic are at the same level.
  • Idling Start/Stop which depends on the clutch being fully depressed has gone missing with the clutch. Start/Stop button isn't there. Couldn't test HHC. Tushar mentioned that on inclines, the XUV AT doesn't roll back. So may be Mahindra has figured out a way to implement HHC without the clutch pedal involved.
  • M&M have dropped the smart key, request sensors and Engine Start/Stop button, which are present in the W10 Manual Transmission version. Didn't understand M&M's logic behind this decision.
  • The automatics I have driven earlier had a button on the gear lever which needs to be pressed when you want to slot out of P (park) mode into either D or R mode. This is sort of a safety mechanism so that you don't accidentally push the lever and get into D or R mode. No such button on the gear lever of the XUV AT.
  • As a true reminder of Mahindra's legendary quality, the bezel around the gear lever popped out every now and then. This was in a brand new car with less than 200 kms on the odo.
  • As I fired up the engine and slotted into D, there was a distinct buzzing sound from the automatic transmission. Not a big irritant, but people upgrading from the manual XUV would notice it. Overall noise levels in the cabin did feel a bit higher than usual.
  • Another thing that I noticed was: there were distinct vibrations - which are evident even visually - on the steering wheel when you slot into D and the vehicle is at standstill. Didn't feel like a well-damped vehicle while waiting at signals.
  • At the same time, as soon you let go of the brakes and the vehicle starts moving, the vibration on the steering wheel vanishes.

Driving impressions:

As I slotted into D and started driving, the XUV AT felt very familiar. As soon as you lift off the brake pedal, the XUV feels eager to pounce and starts moving immediately. Dab your foot on the accelerator and it gains speed and upshifts smoothly. The gear-indicator at the center of the speed dial keeps on showing D and does not indicate the actual gear you are in. I started looking at the RPM needle to understand the upshifts. The gear ratios seem well thought out as there is just a minor dip in RPM as it upshifts. Drive a bit harder and the transmission holds the revs longer before upshifting. Sort of like sport-mode. The gear shifts are pretty quick and smooth. There is no real lag between accelerator input and the vehicle responding. Stomp on the accelerator and only then you will hear the engine roaring but the transmission taking noticeable time before responding. The brakes felt a wee bit sharper than the facelift version, but not sure if M&M have done any changes to the brakes lately.

I took the XUV AT on the highway for about 10 minutes and it felt very responsive as long as I provided light-to-moderate accelerator input. The transmission seemed to be choosing the correct gears. Then Tushar showed me a trick - just slide the gearshift laterally to the left while driving and the transmission moves from D to manual mode. And in the manual mode, the gear-indicator on the dial starts showing the actual gear the transmission has selected. I did that quite a few times for the rest of the drive and invariably found the transmission choosing the exact same gear that I would have chosen (on manual transmission) on the same stretch of road in similar traffic conditions. Quite impressive how the transmission practically reads your mind.

I tried the Manual mode for some time. I didn't particularly like the implementation i.e. the button on the gear shift which is used for shifting gears manually. Standard implementation like paddle-shifters or even the +/- gear slots like an AMT would have been much better and possibly would have given a more substantial feel to the manual mode. The manual mode does give slightly more control over the gears chosen. It's not completely autonomous though. e.g. if you are at really low speeds and try to shift to 4/5/6 using the button, it won't. Similarly while shifting down, it would protect the engine from over-revving and would not allow you to shift to too low a gear for a particular speed. Most likely it is this 'thinking' nature of the manual mode that causes a lag between the button commands and the actual gearshifts happening. Overall, I didn't find the manual mode useful. The transmission seemed intelligent enough to be in the perfect gear for a situation. So the manual-mode would be used by owners only in real tricky situations demanding finer control over the chosen gear.

There is no Sports mode in the XUV500 AT. To be very frank, its not really needed as the default configuration is pretty close to sports mode itself. Let me qualify that last statement with "for a vehicle of this class". It's a big burly crossover highway-cruiser and not really a corner-carving hot hatchback. The current configuration of the XUV AT is quick and responsive. It would have been easy to add a 'normal' or 'eco' mode tuned for better fuel efficiency, but I believe that would have made the XUV sluggish and it could have been detrimental to the XUV's image of a quick highway cruiser.

Overall, I found the automatic transmission a great addition to an already potent package. It's a 6 speed with carefully chosen ratios. It's intelligent and it's quick to respond. More importantly, it comes from a proven lineage and is not a half-baked in-house 'jugaad'. Existing owners of the MT XUVs - who find the long-travel clutch inconvenient and painful over long distances - would definitely be tempted and so would be new customers in the 15-20L bracket who expect AT as a must-have option for this segment. I believe, the XUV AT would be well received in the market, provided the FE remains in an acceptable range. In a way, this development makes the XUV5OO a more 'complete' product from the features perspective. Maybe its time for Mahindra to focus completely on quality now and make the XUV a 'perfect' product. Complete feature set and peace of mind in ownership (brilliant quality + reliability) would be a deadly combination to beat!
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Old 23rd December 2015, 16:49   #8
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Thread moved from the Assembly Line (The "Assembly Line" Forum section) to the Official Reviews Section. Thanks for sharing!

Tushar, brilliant review of a talented SUV - rated 5 stars. @ SDP, thanks a ton for the time & effort. Your insight & comments always bring a lot of value.

The XUV500 AT is my pick among the automatic SUVs. I'd pick it over the Creta AT, and even the more expensive Fortuner AT! Mahindra has conducted the wedding ceremony of the mHawk & Aisin with perfection. After driving the XUV500 AT, it feels like the gearbox was designed for the XUV500, and not the afterthought which it actually is. No jugaad here.

If anyone comes to me for XUV500 advice, I'll tell them to buy the AT over the MT. As SDP stated, many XUV500 MT owners will upgrade to the XUV500 AT. Not just for the automatic tranny, but also because the next level of SUVs cost 8 - 10 lakhs more (Fortuner, Pajero Sport, Trailblazer), but they really don't offer that much more, do they? See how Tanveer replaced his XUV500 with another one (link to his thread).
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Old 23rd December 2015, 17:41   #9
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tushar View Post
In terms of NVH, the XUV500 AT is overall sorted, except for two situations. Say you're at a standstill at a traffic light with the gear lever in 'D' and the brake pedal pressed. Here, there is a prominent amount of vibration felt on the steering wheel. This is incredibly annoying! Your only solution is to move the gear lever into 'P' mode where the vibration levels go down. It's one of those things that is typical of Mahindra - they won't get it right at launch, but will hopefully solve it after customer complaints.
Hi Tushar. Great Review. Good to have an MT Owner's perspective as well.

When you are at a signal with the car in D and your foot on the brake, the car is actually trying to move forward and slipping the clutch, while you are holding it back by keeping a foot on the brakes. So ideally that should lead to vibrations on the brake pedal, and not on the steering wheel. Maybe some AT experts can shed some light on why the vibration is being transmitted to the steering wheel.

Do the vibrations still not go away if you shift to N instead of P? Shifting to N at long halts is anyways recommended in ATs.

P.S.: I drive a DSG
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Old 23rd December 2015, 17:45   #10
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Wow!
I had been frantically calling up the Mahindra guys here at Hyderabad to offer me a test drive for the AT and they havent been enthusiastic at all (they said the XUV AT wont be in until next year). And after reading this, I feel I dont need a test drive at all. Thanks for the detailed test drive report!

I intend to buy a second car for the missus which can also be used for touring. The XUV automatic fits the bill perfectly. I guess the absence of the smart key means that the missus will have to fiddle with her purse to find the ever elusive keys. Oh boy! Why on earth did you do that Mahindra?

XUV AT here I come!
(Oh wait, I think I just saw the 2016 Innova Automatic around the corner. Mind if I go and say a quick hello to her before I come over to pick you up?)
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Old 23rd December 2015, 17:45   #11
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Thank you for this nice review! Finally...the XUV Automatic!!
Glad to know that Mahindra got it spot on with the shifts and ratios.

Some lessons Mahindra never learn - Such an ugly looking key for a 17L+ beauty, while 5L hatch owners flaunt their sexy keys.
Why no keyless entry? Is it to ensure that the key can't be removed from the car except in Parking mode??
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Old 23rd December 2015, 18:29   #12
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Awesome review @Tushar, GTO, SDP. Rated very well deserved 5 stars
Good to see Mahindra getting their act together, this AT sibling is a very good addition to the XUV family. Now let's see how the market actually responds.
And yes, if Mahindra can now focus on the details - the little things that also matter like quality of interiors, fit & finish and fixes for niggles they surely will have a capable winner. Interesting times ahead!

Last edited by NPV : 23rd December 2015 at 18:30.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 18:50   #13
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tushar View Post
This mHawk is a jewel of a motor and its ready torque makes the gearbox look better than it actually is. It's the same situation with the Fortuner 3.0L AT too. Paired to smaller engines (say, a 1.5L petrol), these ATs would be unimpressive.
Torque converters always work well with bigger engines with decent amount of torque, especially with vehicles that have higher curb weight. That's why when many of our members with say i10 auto say they never get good mileage, the same gearbox works for better in the Accent. While the same engine engine from the Accent coupled to a 6 speeder works even better with the heavier Elantra and Creta


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tushar View Post
In terms of long distance cruising ability, few SUVs can match the XUV500 AT. The 6th gear ratio makes for relaxed mile munching - 100 km/h is seen at merely 1,700 rpm and 120 km/h at just above 2,000 rpm. Heck, the SUV will also happily cruise at 80 km/h in 6th gear @ 900 rpm
This doesn't seem proportional, can you re test and comment on this again. The car I got to ride in was doing between 1800 RPM and 1900 RPM at 100 it could have been in 5th or they may have changed ratios in the production vehicles.

How is the engine braking, does the transmission remain engaged when we get our feet of the A pedal in both M & A. Also how does the hill descent assist work, is it engine braking with brake assistance, or some other method.

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Old 23rd December 2015, 18:51   #14
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Better late than never. It looks like a very good buy at it's price. There's no reason to buy a Fortuner AT unless you want 4x4. Mahindra has effectively killed some D segment sedans too.

I only wonder why the keyless entry system was removed? I'm thinking that they had some technical difficulties. I wouldn't like to be proved wrong.

The toyota badge has a lot more aspirational value though.

Just a question: Hasn't Team-BHP got their hands on an AWD XUV 500 for an official review?

Last edited by landcruiser123 : 23rd December 2015 at 18:52.
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Old 23rd December 2015, 19:24   #15
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Default Re: Mahindra XUV500 Automatic : Official Review

Brilliant review Tushar of the much awaited XUV 5OO Automatic! I was eagerly waiting for Team-BHP's official review of the Auto transmission and I must admit that as I read the review it almost felt as if I am test driving it! Yes, it's so well narrated by Tushar, that I do not need to really test drive this monster into detail and book it straight away without any clarification at the back of my mind

Btw, M&M has done a stellar job in matting the 6Speed Aisin box to the XUV's 140 Mhawk! Can't wait to experience driving this automatic cheetah with both left and right foot off the pedals with cruise control engaged on a long highway drive
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