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blackwasp 9th August 2017 15:53

Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
The Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L has been launched in India at a price of between Rs. 3.57 - 3.72 lakhs (ex-Delhi).

What you'll like:

• 1.0L motor brings more power, more torque & better highway performance
Value-for-money pricing. 23k premium over the 0.8L makes it a no-brainer choice
• Funky styling! Looks great for an entry-level hatchback
• Black interiors with high seating, decent space & a powerful air-conditioner
• 222 litre boot is more accommodating than the Alto's (177 litres)
• Suspension's behaviour is well-suited to a city hatchback. 185 mm of ground clearance too
• Warranty & service packages for up to 5 years
• Equipment in a budget car (driver's airbag, DRLs, full MID, ICE remote & more)

What you won't:

• The superior Renault Kwid is priced only slightly higher
• Nothing to visually differentiate it from the 0.8L variant
• Mediocre highway manners. Best driven <100 km/h
• Body-coloured metal inside the cabin looks really bad
• Missing essentials such as internally adjustable ORVMs & retractable rear seatbelts
• Cost cutting is evident in some areas (single wiper, 3 lugnut wheels, small 28L tank etc.)
• Skinny 155 mm tyres beg for an upgrade
• Nissan-Datsun's dealer & after-sales network is far weaker than that of Maruti or Hyundai

This review has been jointly compiled with Aditya. Thanks to him for the expert observations & photography!

blackwasp 9th August 2017 15:53

Since the Datsun Redi-GO has already been reviewed by Team-BHP, this report will only focus on changes made to the 1-litre variant. Click here to read the full review.


blackwasp 9th August 2017 15:53

1 Attachment(s)


The Redi-GO was first showcased as a concept at the 2014 Auto Expo. It is based on the same CMF-A platform that is used in the Renault Kwid. Mechanically, both cars have the same internals and engine options. However, while the Kwid looks like a small SUV, the Redi-GO is designed to look like an urban tallboy.

The Redi-GO was launched in India in June 2016. A Sport variant followed in October 2016 and now, Datsun has brought the Redi-GO 1.0L. Though brand Datsun was relaunched in 2013 for developing markets, it has been more successful in India than Nissan. Datsun has been consistently outselling Nissan since the Redi-GO's launch.



The entry-level car market in India is dominated by Maruti & Hyundai. However, as the Kwid has proven, customers are willing to give another brand a shot as long as its product is value-for-money and offers something to differentiate it from the rest - be it styling or features (Kwid has offered both).

Hence, like the Kwid, Datsun introduces the 1.0-liter engine in the Redi-GO. Only logical as the Kwid 1.0 outsells its 0.8L sibling (1.0L accounts for well over half of all Kwid sales). It is a simple copy-paste job and while the AMT is not yet launched, Datsun officials state that the transmission will be here soon.

The Redi-GO's 799cc engine was purely a commuter motor and could just about get the job done. Nothing else. Being lighter than other cars in the segment helped, but overall, it's a mediocre motor. The 999cc engine changes the car's characteristics. The power-to-weight ratio of the Redi-GO 1.0L is a segment-leading 98 BHP / ton! Datsun has also kept the premium for the 1.0-liter engine reasonable at Rs. 23,200. At this price, choosing the 1.0L over the 0.8L is a no-brainer.

Attachment 1664862

Apart from the new engine, the Redi-GO 1.0L gets some additional features such as remote central locking, black interiors and seat covers. The black interiors are a welcome change from the dull light grey of the 0.8L. The 1.0-liter engine is available in the top two trims - T(O) and S only. As is the case with most cars in the segment, a single driver airbag is available on the top variant. We would have liked it if the car came with ABS and a passenger airbag as well. Certain features like rear wash/wipe & internally adjustable ORVMs would have been welcome additions.

What is likely to put some buyers off is that Datsun has not made any noticeable changes to differentiate the Redi-GO 1.0L from its 0.8L sister. Unless you look very hard, the layman will just not be able to tell the two apart. Buyers would prefer a few more differentiating features - maybe alloy wheels or new colour options exclusive to the 1.0L. It may be recalled that Renault had adopted a similar approach when the Kwid 1.0 was introduced in the market. However, while the Kwid was at least given chequered-flag stickers on its sides and new dual-tone door mirrors, the Redi-GO has not been given any cosmetic updates.



So, what's new on the outside?

The Redi-GO 1.0L looks absolutely identical to the 0.8L version, except for a tiny 1.0 badge on the bottom-left corner of the tailgate. Renault & Datsun need to learn a thing or two from the Alto K10 vs Alto 800:


A closer look at the chrome 1.0 badge:

blackwasp 9th August 2017 15:53

So, what's new on the inside?

The most noticeable change to the interior is the all-black colour theme. It is definitely better than the boring grey theme of the 0.8L - easier to maintain & easier on the eyes:


3-spoke steering wheel is now black in colour:


The darker background makes these silver accents stand out more:


Front doorpads dipped in black too. The exposed metal looks ugly, but some people will like the contrast, especially in cars with lime (green) or ruby (red) body colours:


The cabin light and optional illuminated door sills are now wired to both front doors. They were wired only to the driver's door in the Redi-GO 0.8L:


The Redi-GO 1.0L comes with fabric upholstery as standard. These artificial leather seat covers are optional extras. The lime (green) car that we drove had black seat covers with yellow highlights:


The contrasting colours brighten up things and enhance the overall look of the interior. A cheap + effective way to spice up an entry-level car:


"Redi-GO" branding on the front seat covers:


A closer look at the stitching:


Nifty pockets on the sides can be used to store knick-knacks:


Finally, the Redi-GO gets central locking! Door lock/unlock button is situated on the center fascia, next to the audio system:


A look at the black rear doorpads:


Seat covers come with wide & deep seatback pockets. Should've been ironed before showcasing to the media!!


Media cars of all other body colours had black seat covers with red highlights:


The rear seat with black & red covers:


New remote key is better looking (check out the old key here). The backside gets a Datsun badge and glossy black touches:

blackwasp 9th August 2017 15:53

Driving the Redi-GO 1.0L

1.0L engine is a tighter fit than the 0.8L. 3-cylinder motor churns out 67 BHP and 91 Nm of torque:


While the insulation on the firewall and under the bonnet are unchanged, the engine mounts are different from the 0.8L. They are identical to the Kwid 1.0's:


Ground clearance remains unchanged at 185 mm (unladen). It is a boon on bad Indian roads, but the exposed oil sump is a cause for concern:


The 1.0L engine is a bored-out version of the 0.8L unit and makes use of many plastic components (valve cover, intake manifold, oil sump etc.). This basically means that the block is new, along with the internals. It also has a maintenance-free timing chain (instead of the usual timing belt) that does contribute to noise from the engine. A year ago, the same engine was introduced in its French cousin - the Kwid 1.0. This 999cc, 3-cylinder, 12-valve motor makes 67 BHP @ 5,500 rpm and 91 Nm of torque @ 4,250 rpm, which is 14 BHP and 19 Nm more than the 0.8-litre engine (made at a lower rpm as well). At 681 kilos, the Redi-GO has a power-to-weight ratio of 98 BHP / ton and torque-to-weight ratio of 134 Nm / ton. In comparison, the Alto K10 & Eon 1.0's power-to-weight ratios are 91 BHP / ton & 86 BHP / ton.

Fire the motor up and immediately, you know something's different. There are lesser vibrations at startup and the idle feels smoother than in the Redi-GO 800 (it's still not 4-cylinder smooth though). There are some vibrations felt on the steering wheel, gear lever & pedals, accompanied by a little body shake. Once the car is moving, the steering and pedal vibrations are almost gone (you'll still feel some on the gear lever). The engine sounds like a typical 3-cylinder unit and you always hear that familiar thrum inside the cabin.

Engage first, pop the clutch and you'll feel a marked improvement in the way that the Redi-GO 1.0 drives. The car does feel a lot more eager off the line & it can even roll off from a standstill in 2nd gear! You won't stall it as easily as the 0.8L as the low end has definitely improved. You can easily potter around in town at 40 km/h in fourth gear, with the engine ticking over at 1,500 rpm. The accelerator also isn't as sensitive as the 0.8L's; this reduces jerks and results in smoother overall power delivery. I drove in Goan traffic and was far more comfortable in the 1.0L. It's just easier to drive in the city with the additional torque; plus, I didn't have to shift down to 1st as often as in the weaker 0.8L.

The mid-range is a lot more punchy. You can easily keep up with traffic and even avoid downshifts when climbing up flyovers. The 1.0L allows you to drive in a relaxed manner. There's no need to work the engine & gearbox hard. The higher seating of the Redi-GO, healthy all-round visibility and the superior 1.0L motor make the Redi-GO a fantastic city car.

On the open road is where the Redi-GO 1.0L shows its true potential. The 1.0L feels like a different car vs the older 0.8L. It was completely at home cruising down the highway. The car can cruise on the expressway at 80 km/h & 100 km/h in 5th gear at 2,500 rpm & 3,000 rpm respectively. Sustaining triple digits is easier and the engine doesn’t feel stressed out. In comparison, the Redi-GO 800 at triple digits is too busy. Overtaking trucks in the 1.0 is easier as well. You don’t even need to downshift from 5th gear when slowing down to 70-80 km/h; there’s lesser downshifts needed if you lose momentum & need to get back up to speed. You'll especially notice the improvement with passengers & luggage onboard (weight bogged the Redi-GO 800 down). Of course, end of the day, it's still a small 1.0L motor and you need to plan your overtakes out, especially on undivided highways. Performance after 120 km/h will start tapering off. Just as well since the Redi-GO feels best below that speed. Also remember that the car is a lightweight entry-level hatchback & the Kwid (on which it's based) got a poor NCAP safety rating. Keep the speedo needle in check on the expressway.

The gears are easy to slot with medium-length throws. There is a hint of a rubbery feeling, yet it is sure-slotting and you won’t miss a shift. The clutch has a short travel range and is light to operate.

The 1.0L has that typical 3-cylinder thrum and is far from '4-cylinder smooth', yet the engine is less restrained and more free revving in nature. Up to 3,000 rpm, there is some engine noise coming into the cabin, but it's not irritating. However, once you cross 4,000 rpm, it gets loud and after 4,500 rpm, its very loud! Wind noise starts coming in when the speedometer is close to 100 km/h, as does road noise. The insulation is budget grade, so one can hear many noises inside this car. That said, overall NVH is better than in the Redi-GO 800 as the engine is lesser stressed in the same driving conditions.

The Redi-GO has a CMVR-certified fuel-efficiency of 22.5 km/l. Despite its slightly higher kerb weight, the Kwid 1.0 is more frugal (23.01 km/l), at least on paper. The segment-leading Alto K10 is the most efficient of the lot with a figure of 24.07 km/l.

Ride & Handling

While the engine of the Redi-GO 1.0L is larger and more powerful, the car's suspension remains unchanged. We found the ride quality to be compliant at urban speeds. City commuters will not find any problem with it. The Redi-GO feels sorted for an entry-level car. We didn't feel uncomfortable on the highway either. The suspension handled most small to medium-sized undulations with ease and it was only the big bumps that made their presence felt.

The Redi-GO is meant to be an urban runabout. It simply does not feel planted at triple digit speeds. There is a good deal of vertical movement on hitting undulations at triple digit speeds too. A combination of the low kerb weight, puny 155/80 R13 tyres and short wheelbase is to be blamed for this. Hence, it's best to keep the car's speed under 90 - 100 km/h.

In the corners, body roll was much lesser than expected for a car as tall as the Redi-GO. That said, it is certainly not a vehicle that wants to be pushed hard. The grip from the stock tyres is more suited to sedate driving. If you get aggressive, they will give up and the car will understeer. A tyre upgrade will certainly improve the car's handling & road manners (we highly recommend it). Even so, it's best to respect the limits of this entry-level hatchback.

The steering is very direct and very light. This makes it user-friendly at slow speeds. The light steering, small turning radius (4.7 m), soft clutch and good driveability make the Redi-GO an excellent urban commuter. What is slightly disappointing is that the return-to-center action of the steering is weak, which means you have to manually turn the wheel back after tight U-turns.

However, while the steering is a boon in the city, it is just not suitable for highway driving. It does not weigh up as the speed increases and feels rather vague. In addition to this, the steering wheel is sensitive at highway speeds, causing sudden movements on small inputs. On the highway, this can get unnerving.

The 185-mm of ground clearance and short wheelbase are useful when you take the car on broken roads or even slightly off the road. We didn't scrape the undercarriage anywhere on our trip.

Unfortunately, there is no ABS available on any model. It should have been offered as standard on the 1.0L. The brakes perform as expected of a budget hatchback (read = they do the job, but just that). The braking ability is suited to a calm driving style. We did feel that the pedal requires to be pressed a little more than we would like before the brakes bite.

In other news, Datsun has introduced 'Datsun Care' service packages for the Redi-GO. These packages include the costs for routine maintenance, extended warranty and 24x7 roadside assistance. They can even be transferred to the new owner after selling the car - related thread.

Disclaimer: Datsun invited Team-BHP for the Redi-GO 1.0L test-drive. They covered all the travel expenses for this driving event.

GTO 10th August 2017 15:05

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Thread moved from the Assembly Line to the Official Review Section. Thanks for sharing!

Reinhard 10th August 2017 15:21

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Good review! I don't think the car has anything that will actually make the buyers walk away from established brands and buy a DATSUN.

The "cars are unsafe" damage done with the reports for the GO has irreparably damaged the brand's fortunes in India in my opinion.


Quote:

Originally Posted by blackwasp (Post 4249146)
The Redi-GO's 799cc engine was purely a commuter motor and could just about get the job done. Nothing else. Being lighter than other cars in the segment helped, but overall, it's a mediocre motor. The 999cc engine changes the car's characteristics. The power-to-weight ratio of the Redi-GO 1.0L is a segment-leading 98 BHP / ton! Datsun has also kept the premium for the 1.0-liter engine reasonable at Rs. 23,200. At this price, choosing the 1.0L over the 0.8L is a no-brainer.

Attachment 1664862

In the review I feel its a bit odd to see a Tata Tiago. If a Tata has to be in the table - it should be the NANO. Tiago doesn't really compare with this car at all. Really TBHP? Why?

aaychat 10th August 2017 15:33

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reinhard (Post 4249797)
The "cars are unsafe" damage done with the reports for the GO has irreparably damaged the brand's fortunes in India in my opinion.

Precisely. In the country with the highest road accident related deaths, I feel that we should have a special focus on safety.
I understand that a lot of it has to do with the driving style, flouting of rules etc. which need to be resolved if we wish to see any real progress but promoting safer cars and dissing which compromise on it won't hurt either.

The Indian consumer needs to be better informed about safety being a top criteria in the purchase evaluation process. It's the best form of insurance IMO.

Each time I look at this video, I get chills down my spine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRzh8uLA1tM

I hope they took something home from it and that the Redi-Go fares better. Yet to see a crash test video for it. Has anyone seen it?

libranof1987 10th August 2017 15:54

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
I honestly hope this car fails, just because it is nothing short of a joke. It is only when such compromise of a car is rejected by the market will manufacturers think twice about getting such products to India.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reinhard (Post 4249797)
Good review! I don't think the car has anything that will actually make the buyers walk away from established brands and buy a DATSUN.

The "cars are unsafe" damage done with the reports for the GO has irreparably damaged the brand's fortunes in India in my opinion.

Very, very unfortunately, sales numbers don't reflect this apprehension. Kwid has sold between 7k-10k over the last few months and RediGo around 2k.

Sale of Maruti cars defy this logic.

Quote:

In the review I feel its a bit odd to see a Tata Tiago. If a Tata has to be in the table - it should be the NANO.
+1

GTO 10th August 2017 17:51

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reinhard (Post 4249797)
In the review I feel its a bit odd to see a Tata Tiago. Tiago doesn't really compare with this car at all. Really TBHP? Why?

Tiago was just put in as a wild card entry to show that cars from half a segment above aren't that far away, there is price overlap between variants and because it's the newest kid on the block (in its segment).

Let's not take this discussion anymore off-topic.

Thanks!

Dieselritzer 10th August 2017 18:22

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Last week a relative sent me a text telling they were thinking of buying this car. i immediately called them and advised them not to even touch this brand. Rather buy a 10 yr old Punto or Fiesta rather than this stupid tin can. Just look at that crash test video and its so damn scary.

I think poor build structure should have been listed in "what you won't".

Dry Ice 10th August 2017 18:31

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reinhard (Post 4249797)
In the review I feel its a bit odd to see a Tata Tiago. If a Tata has to be in the table - it should be the NANO. Tiago doesn't really compare with this car at all. Really TBHP? Why?

Look at it from the other side, when you get a product like Tiago in similar ballpark figure, why settle for a RediGo? That said, it was included I guess mainly based on the similar entry price. When people are in the market with, say, 5 lakhs in hand, they don't restrict themselves to a segment, rather look across segments to find the best bang for their buck!

AkMar 10th August 2017 18:38

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Excellent, to the point review. Only Team BHP can come up with such detailed reviews for even a variant with new engine :thumbs up

As for the car itself, it is a decent option in the entry level segment, though I will still prefer the Alto twins or Kwid over the Redi-go.

Udit 10th August 2017 20:20

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Redi-go gets most of the bashing despite the fact that it is based on same platform that underpins Kwid. In fact, mechanically it is more close to kwid than Go/Go+. On the other hand, Kwid is accepted wholeheartedly.

I would any day pick Redigo over Kwid, Alto, eon etc. I have extensively driven Alto 800, Kwid and Redi-go. No car is safe in this price range. All meet more or less similar fate once they meet an accident. But Redi-go is more VFM than any other in this segment. Redi-go is actually a Kwid at Alto's price. Even I feel seats are better in Redigo as compared to Kwid. Eon is simply overpriced. New Alto is very bare bone, it has nothing good except F8D engine and that Maruti Suzuki moniker it boasts.

Redi-go is a very good urban commuter. Datsun offers a 5 year unlimited km warranty with road side assistance which covers even tire punctures and emergency fuel fills etc. Even service packs are cheap. So for 5 years, it is unlikely to give you any serious trouble if you have a Nissan service center in your reach.

silverado 10th August 2017 21:56

Re: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L : Official Review
 
Redi-go is a good alternative to Nano/Alto. Ingress/Egress is better than Kwid and it looks decent as well. It is a good City runabout which can do occasional highway runs.

If Renault gives it ABS, it will be a USP in this segment.


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