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Old 31st May 2010, 15:25   #1
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Default BMW 525d : Test Drive & Review

What you'll like:

• Classic BMW styling. A timeless design, no more quirkiness
• 7 series quality, inside out. Actually based on the exact same platform
• Stunning performance, flexibility & refinement from the 6 cylinder diesel
• Immaculate balance in ride and handling
• Cutting-edge tech (8 speed gearbox, regenerative braking, full iDrive etc.)
• 5 star safety. 6 airbags & endless electronic aids. Outstanding brakes
• 5 year / 100,000 kms all-inclusive maintenance packages

What you won't:

• Electric power steering. Drive is not as pure as the E60 on the limit
• Runflat tyres mandatory. No room for a space saver spare either
• Legroom about the same as the E60. No perceptible increase. Rear headroom at a premium
• E60 fans wont take kindly to the conservative styling

The 530d:

Link to review (BMW 530d M-Sport (F10) : My pre-worshipped beast)


Last edited by GTO : 28th August 2015 at 11:49. Reason: Linking to 530d
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:25   #2
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Apt sticker, wouldn't you agree? Meaty tail-pipes. Point straight out unlike in the E60 525 which had them going downward:


The F10 is the 6th generation 5 series. This is the bread & butter car for BMW; a model that contributes most to the bottom line in a segment that has frequently outsold the cheaper 30 lakh 3 series (in the ‘09 calendar year). Why did we choose to run a comprehensive test on the 525d? Simply because, of the 4 engine options, this is the most relevant to India, and undoubtedly the most popular amongst Indian customers. The 525d is the entry-level diesel. BMW themselves know that the 535i is a showroom trophy; it’s the 523i and the 525d that will count for a bulk of the sales. Do also check out our 530d review at this link (BMW 530d : Test Drive & Review).

The F10 looks like a shrunken-7 series and has the same character of its bigger brother. Gone is the controversial love me / hate me approach of the E60, this car wears clothes with broader appeal. The E39 5 series proportions and current 3 series styling cues (especially when viewed from the side) are obvious. It's distinctly longer & wider than the outgoing generation, though there isn't much of a difference in the overall height. The large kidney grill & 7 series type headlamps grab attention up at the front. Compare the E60 and the F10 side by side, and whats immediately apparent is the new 5's sharply curved C pillar. The E39 was the last 5 series to wear a timeless look. Now, 7 full years later (production span of the E60), the 5 series wears a BMWesque design again. Its clean, its low, its proportionate and definitely a car that will look good several years down the line. The F10 doesn't merely look like the 7 series. As a matter of fact, the 5 is based on the 7 series chassis (wheelbase shortened by a 100 mm for the 5).





BMW equips the 525d with 6 airbags, a plethora of electronic safety aids (traction control, ABS, brake assist and stability control), 8 speed automatic transmission, regenerative braking system, electronic parking brake, auto-hold brakes, iDrive with a 7" screen, fully electric front seat adjustments, driver's seat memory (for 2), dual zone climate control, 6 DVD entertainment system with voice control / bluetooth / USB / AUX, sunroof, bi-xenon headlamps + washers, automatic headlamps + wipers, sun blinds for rear windows + windscreen, park distance control (front + rear), tyre pressure monitoring system and runflat tyres. Priced at Rs. 39.90 lakhs ex-showroom, a mere 1 lakh rupees separate the 525d from chief competitor, the Mercedes E250 CDI. Link to BMW 5 series launch thread (*New* BMW 5 Series (F10) Launched!). Importantly, the BMW offers 2 more cylinders, 3 more gears and a far superior standard equipment list vis a vis the E250 CDI.

A major downside is the absence of a spare tyre. Not only that, but there isn’t room for a spare in the boot either (the E60’s boot could accommodate a space-saver tyre). Good luck if you have a flat tyre mid-way to Goa (with Bombay & Goa, both, 300 kms on either side). The maximum distance that you can drive on a runflat puncture is either 240 kms (Driver + 1 passenger), 145 kms (Driver + 3 passengers) or 48 kms (Driver + 4 passengers + luggage). All of this at a maximum speed of 80 kph. I’d much rather pull over and change to a spare in 10 minutes. To add to that, if you drive the stipulated distance on a flat tyre, you will need to replace it. Cost = Upward of Rs. 20,000 each. Click here (Run Flats could go Flat) to view an interesting discussion on runflats.

Long hood, short boot look. Notice sharp coupe-like C pillar:


7 series'ish L shape tail-lamps:


245/45 R18 Dunlop SP Sport Maxx GT tyres. Regular spec 525d is equipped with 225/55 R17 rubber:


Puddle lights look fab! And do a great job too:








I usually take test cars down to the Mumbai-Pune expressway. For the BMW? Naah! We chose the Bombay-Nasik road instead. Well-paved with dividers most of the way, fast curves, ghat sections with awesome twisties et al:






That's the radio antenna, right above the rear windscreen:


The F10 has a late night meet with the E60:

Last edited by GTO : 10th September 2011 at 12:45. Reason: Spell check
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:26   #3
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7 series dashboard. Has a subtle tilt toward the driver (a la cockpit effect). Switch the engine off, and the steering moves up to support egress. Switch the engine on and you’ll see the steering move back to its last chosen position:




The 525d is a fairly low slung car, so the elderly may have to cautiously approach ingress / egress. Shut the door and you’ll wonder where the European “thud” has gone! Right, there isn’t one. The doors feel surprisingly light for an über-German car. Primary reason being, this is the first 5 series with aluminium doors. The interiors are crafted to very high standards and overall feel is atleast two generations ahead of the E60. We remember the E-Class borrowing a lot from the S-Class; the 5 series in turn takes heavily from the 7 (God bless competition!). Everything is soft & well damped here. Plastic quality is of a very tall order, while the choice of veneer reeks of taste. Each button feels tactile & has a rich “damped” feeling. The (now ubiquitous) dull aluminium touches are spread across the cabin. Spend a couple of moments inside and the feeling is distinctly premium. Anyone who has sat in the 7 series will immediately feel at home in the 5. The similar interior design isn’t swoopy or curvy, and doesn’t really give out the “wow” effect. Rather, just like the exteriors, its understated class.

An infinitely adjustable driver’s seat will ensure you find that perfect driving position easily. Full electric adjustment for the seats as well as steering rake & reach are standard. You can store 2 driver settings (seat, steering, mirrors) into the memory too. The steering is a size bigger than what you’d expect in a BMW. It’s not compact or chunky and, on the 525d, there aren’t any paddle shifts either (available with the 530d). The unobtrusive A pillars don’t create an uncomfortable blind spot at all. The driver has excellent frontal and side visibility. On the flip side, the rear windscreen is short. That, coupled with the high boot lid, can pose a challenge to shorter drivers. In fact, there was an Innova parked closely behind us and I couldn't even see his headlamps.

The front seats are incredibly cushiony where they need to be and provide A+ support over long drives. Extremely comfortable, room at the front is terrific. Plus, due to the cars width, there's over a foot of space between the driver & co-passenger shoulders. Chauffeur-driven owners will love the reclined seat back angle at the rear. Everyone knows how I like sharply reclined seats and this is just to my taste. Support to the full back is perfect (10/10), albeit under-thigh support only above average (7.5/10). Armrests (center & on the doors) are perfectly placed. The rear window sill isn’t too high, and thus there is no feeling of claustrophobia. The 5 series has manual curtains for both, the window & quarter glass on either rear door, while the rear windscreen has an electric sunscreen as well. Outright space at the back is more or less the same as the outgoing 5 series. If there is any additional room, it’s really not perceptible. We say this after sitting in the E60 & F10 back to back. Legroom is sufficient, though the E Class definitely has additional space. The transmission tunnel is awfully high. This makes the 5 series more suited to two on the back seat, rather than three. Headroom was just about enough for me, though noticeably lesser than in the E60. At 5’10”, I had 2 inches between my head and the roof. Go back to the second post and observe the sharp coupe-like C Pillar design.

The current-generation iDrive system is sheer brilliance. Besides, it is now fairly simple to use. The “back” button (absent in the E60’s iDrive) makes things far easier. To start with, the complete owner’s manual has been fed in (including pictorial explanations). In the 5 series, you can use the iDrive to control the entertainment system, mobile phone, contacts, BMW services (including a hotline to your dealer), vehicle information and an infinite number of vehicle settings. Moreover, you can store up to 3 profiles. Thus, if you share the car with other family members, it's possible to entirely customize the car to your preferences and store them. There’s even a “guest” profile (like in Windows PCs). This is so much better than the wasted screen in the Mercedes E Class that merely controls an audio system.

Storage space is unexpectedly conservative. The center glovebox is barely two inches deep (not the bucket type that you get in most cars), the door pockets are small (by segment standards) and the dash glovebox is medium-sized. There is another storage drawer on the driver's side of the dash (below headlamp switch). Without doubt, my humble previous-gen C220 offers superior interior storage solutions (including XL size door pockets).

Classic BMW dial arrangement. Easy to read in bright daylight. Looks a tad too plain by current trends though:


Horizontal section in the middle houses the audio system controls, lower one for climate control. Numerous buttons take some getting used to. Note the ribbed airflow controls (its the smaller things, really). Individual climate + blower + airflow controls (face, feet or both) for driver + front passenger:


Gearlever design is a lesson in ergonomics. Fits into the palm of your hand. Electronic handbrake and Auto-Hold function below. The "P)))" button on the lower right controls the parking sensors. At the top left is the traction control "off" button


iDrive now has additional buttons which make for simpler navigation:


iDrive screen smaller than in the E60. Plastic panels (space fillers) on either side look out of place with their basic texture (go 3 pictures up):


As long as the key fob is in your pocket, you only need to press the engine start button (no need to insert the key anywhere):


Fully electric driver seat adjustment. 4 way lumbar support keeps the lower back happy:


Click on this thumbnail (larger picture in a new window) and you'll see the memory seat buttons. Rear electric sunshade control is right below the power window buttons. Door pockets too small:


6 DVD changer. Tucks away nicely into the glovebox ceiling:


Center glovebox. AUX / USB / Bluetooth compatible system. Sound quality surprisingly average (by segment standards). Merc ICE systems have more bass. I’ll give this one a 6 / 10 rating for SQ:


All 4 cupholders (front shown here) can hold 1 liter water bottles. Key fob fits exactly into the slot below the ashtray (though I'd personally keep it in my pocket at all times):


Decent rear legroom. Same as the E60 though:


That’s all the air-con controls that the rear passengers get. Temperature adjustment conspicuous by its absence:


Curtains for main window area as well as the rear quarterglass:


520 liter boot capacity:


Hidden storage area in the boot:


Locking / unlocking doors requires the buttons to be pressed (not like the Cruze where doors unlock automatically when the key fob is close by). Press the lock button and the doors will lock, but the ORVMs won’t fold in. For that, you need to keep the lock button depressed for more than 2 seconds:

Last edited by GTO : 1st June 2010 at 14:12.
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:26   #4
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Power comes from a 3.0 liter inline-6 cylinder diesel engine that is rated at 204 BHP (@3,750 rpm) and 450 NM of torque (@1750 - 2500 rpm). Step inside and press the engine start button (no need to insert the key anywhere). The low rpm throttle response is instantaneous. Turbolag? What turbolag…there isn't the slightest. Urban driveability is phenomenal. An ultra-light foot is all that you will need within the city. Spot a gap at 30 kph, floor the throttle, the car willingly drops a gear and lunges forward with sheer ferocity. The 450 NM of torque always makes its presence felt; kick down at any speed, any rpm, any gear, and the car shoots ahead. Overtaking fast moving trucks & buses is easy as pie; overtaking those wannabe racers in souped up Jap cars equally so (this car can seriously humble them). The engine is incredibly revv-happy, almost petrol like, and gives out a nice inline-six snarl when rushing from 3,000 to 4,900 rpm. Even at the upper range of 4,000 – 4,900 rpm, it doesn't seem to be running out of breath at all. Plus, the engine note at 4,000+ rpm is sweet. Power delivery is linear all through the rpm range & the engine boasts of an immensely tractable nature. There’s a good and a bad side to this. The good : No peakiness, better to drive and easier on the passengers (no constant back & forth movement for them). The bad : E60 fans will miss that “being pushed into the seat” feeling. The first thing that Sahil commented after driving the F10 was “I know its quicker, but where is that feeling of surge? Why is it not pushing me into the driver's seat like my 525d?” 0 – 100 comes up in 7.5 seconds (power to weight of 120 BHP / tonne). Keep the accelerator pedal buried and she will see the other side of 230 kph. This level of performance is expected within the segment, yet is stunning nevertheless.



To engage sport mode, simply slot the gear lever to the left. The shifts now take place at a higher rpm and the shift action is more aggressive too. In regular D mode, at full throttle, the engine will upshift anywhere between 4,200 – 4,400 rpm (dependent on the speed, gear and road conditions). In Sport mode at full throttle, the upshift is at a higher 4,900 rpm. You can work the gearbox by tapping it up and down (for lower and higher ratios respectively). I've always recommended using the automatic mode, even in the DSGs, yet in this BMW, an enthusiast can (and SHOULD) engage manual mode. Playing with the “joystick” gearlever & working the revvs is sheer bliss on the twisties. It's fairly generous in allowing downshifts when most other cars won't (due to the resultant higher rpm), feels eager to drop 2 / 3 / 4 gears and greatly helps engine braking. Best part about the gearbox is its flexibility. Those 8 ratios help to evenly distribute the power. Give it 30 – 60% throttle and it'll downshift seamlessly, the engines torque giving you all the momentum that you need. This is the best way to drive when passenger comfort, unobtrusive gearshifts & a smooth driving style are priorities. On the other hand, mash the throttle into the floor, and the box enthusiastically drops 3 gears, the car shooting forward instantaneously! Those 8 ratios are perfectly matched to this engines power & torque characteristics. Under normal city driving conditions, the engine upshifts below 2,000 rpm in the first 2 gears, and from the 3rd gear on, at a mere 1,500 rpm. At 60 kph in the city, the engine is ticking over at 1,200 rpm! At 120 kph, a mere 1,400 rpms. This car is a relaxed cruiser in a way that the E60 never was. At idle, there is mild diesel murmur (you know its a diesel). On the move, the 6 cylinder’s refinement is butter smooth. Cruising at 50 kph or 150, the engine is totally inaudible on the inside. No sound at all. On the other hand, at high speeds, you can hear a certain amount of wind noise from the mirrors.

The suspension is brilliantly tuned, and offers the perfect balance between comfort & grip. The most significant improvement over the outgoing E60 5 series is the F10’s giant leap ahead in ride quality. At low speeds within the city, a given German car weakness, the suspension is surprisingly compliant. It even takes those medium-sized bumps rather well. Of course, an unforgiving huge crater will send a jolt inside, while some suspension firmness is felt over broken roads. Can’t run away from the stiff sidewalls of the runflat tyres. The E-Class is definitely more pampering on such irregular roads. Yet, the 5 is close and no one will be complaining like they were in the E60. Reality is, the 5 series now rides like a 40 – 50 lakh rupee luxury sedan ought to (which the E60 never did, BTW). We chose the Bombay-Nasik road as this stretch is more representative of typical Indian driving conditions (some parts are under-construction and have potholes, uneven surfaces etc.). Rarely did the BMW give us a rude knock up our spines. It stayed flat for the most part, and comfort levels improve further as the speedometer needle climbs. Sahil chose to drive the car on stretches that are part of his daily commute (smart move) and immediately commented that the ride quality is better than in his E60 525d. Note that he is running regular Michelin tyres on 17 inch wheels, while our F10 was on 18 inch runflats (245/45 R18). BMW sells the stock 525d with 225/55 R 17 tyres. I’m only wondering how much more the ride comfort will improve once Team-BHPians swap their runflats for regular Michelin / Yokohama tyres (retaining the 17" size). That coupled with the absolute lack of engine noise and supportive seats make it suited to long distance highway cruising.

The electric steering wheel is certainly NOT the pure hydraulic unit of the E60. Feedback & feel are nowhere as good. Additionally, you can feel some “artificial” center-back action even at <80 kph speeds. This is the difference between the ol’ traditional and the new electric unit...you simply don't feel as connected. On the positive side, it weighs up sufficiently well at speed and I never thought it's too light. At 150-200 kph, the steering weight is good (though and again, still not as pure as in the E60). Within the city, the steering is light & sharp, making urban driving an easy exercise. The electric unit has none of the “heaviness” that we've experienced in the current 3 series or the E60 5 series at <50 kph (unanimous owner complaint of the older cars). The lightness & direct action do result in agility, you can literally chuck the car in and out of gaps. Switch the Auto Hold function on in traffic and there is no need to keep the brake pedal depressed when stationary in traffic (with gearbox in “D” mode). Tap the brake pedal once at 0 kph and the BMW will stay put in its place. The minute you touch the accelerator, the auto hold function automatically deactivates. The auto hold, light steering, auto gearbox and frontal visibility make the 5 easy (for a car of this size) to pilot in bumper to bumper traffic.

Uniquely positioned brace (for stability):


High speed stability is tremendous, with passengers always feeling that it's doing 50 kph lesser than actual (we tried guessing games ). Grip levels are similar to the E60 (a good thing) on paved roads. On uneven surfaces, the F10 is superior and much better planted. You can literally make the car dance on ghat sections. That said, in fast corners, the body roll definitely felt higher than in the outgoing generation. It's a given that European cars from this segment will have excellent brakes. Well, the 5 series anchors are even better than you'd expect. Both, in feel and in effectiveness. The car can shed a serious amount of speed under hard braking. The pedal is easy to modulate, whether you are driving within the city or at full clip on the expressway. They greatly enhance your confidence levels while driving. BMW equips the F10 with a regenerative braking system. The energy that is normally wasted when you brake is instead used to drive the alternator. Get this, the alternator is engaged only during deceleration. When accelerating, the alternator is completely disengaged. Of course, if the battery charge falls too low, then the system will switch back to a conventional charging mode. 141 mm of ground clearance equates to caution over large bumps. Over our 300 km test-drive, we scraped the under-belly once, and that was over a "jugaad" construction area speedbreaker.

This car may not be as "on the edge" as the E60, yet it’s a superior BMW to live with. The 5 now appeals to a broader segment of the market.

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Old 31st May 2010, 15:26   #5
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Other Points:

• Deliveries start in July 2010.

• I HIGHLY recommend opting in on the BSI (BMW service inclusive) maintenance packages. 4 options : 3 yrs / 60,000 kms, 3 yrs / 90,000 kms, 5 years / 60,000 kms or 5 years / 100,000 kms. Choose the "ultimate" package that covers you for all repairs & replacements. You only pay for diesel & tyres throughout the coverage. This is a key advantage to BMW; Mercedes doesn't offer anything like it.

• Similar to the strategy that BMW adopted with the E60, we can expect a cheaper 4-cylinder 520d variant to be launched next year. After all, the smaller diesel engine is already sold on the 3 series, and is readily available inhouse.

• The previous generations (of the E Class & 5 series) made the choice simple : The E Class was for chauffeur-driven types, while the 5 series was the one for those who loved to drive. Now, however, things have changed. Both the cars are comfortable, great to drive (though BMW has the clear edge) and Merc has increased their level of kit too. The BMW is a better mix of fun to drive & comfort, yet purchase decisions will most likely be based on brand preferences, looks, proximity of dealerships and past experiences (with either brand).

• The F10 5 series is an incredibly easy car to drive fast. At high speeds, the massive proportions and 1,705 kilo kerb weight seem to shrink around you.

• Say you press the lock button, and one of the passenger doors is left open. No sign or warning at all. Strange.

• Neat safety touch : The electronic handbrake cannot be released unless you press the brake pedal. Or the gearbox is in “Park” mode. Will prevent accidental movement (remember how the door of my C220 got damaged?).

• Another safety touch : To prevent unintentional door opening. When the car is locked, pulling the door handle once “unlocks” it. Pulling it a second time actually opens the door.

• I wish the steering was thicker. Distinctly remember the 535i steering feeling better. This is a size too large & a size too thin. The 535 unit even had contours to rest your thumb on (missing in the 525d).

• Funnily enough, the Auto Hold function has to be manually activated each time that you start the car. When you switch the engine off, so does the autohold function get deactivated.

• Has a typically European car horn. Nice & deep. Loud on the outside too. Unlike the Mercs & the Skodas, this one didn’t end up with a bad throat after a full day of usage. Hornpad isn’t spread out to the edges, you will need to stretch your thumbs to honk. The Merc E-Class setup is better suited to Indian usage.

• Center glovebox is lockable, in-dash glovebox isn’t.

• No need for a hard press to activate the “Auto Hold” function. A light tap is all that's required. Neither do you need to look at the display (every time you stop) to see if the auto-hold has engaged. You can feel the brake pedal depressing slightly, and automatically, whenever the auto-hold engages at 0 kph.

• In addition to the doors, the bonnet, front side panels and suspension components are made of aluminium. BMW says the doors alone save them 23 kilos of weight (vis a vis regular doors).

• CAUTION : If the key is in your pocket, and you walk away from the driver’s seat, the engine does NOT automatically switch off. Remember to press the Engine start / stop button to switch the engine off, and only then walk away.

• Once you switch the engine off, walk out and press the lock button, the air-conditioner / stereo system / headlights switch off. No need to switch each off independently.

• Turning circle = 11.95 meters (Radius = almost 6 meters).

• Though BMW offers other interior colour options, my personal choice is that of our test car : Black + tan brown + aluminium accents.

• Doors open to a near 90 degree angle.

• As in most European cars, the 5 has lane change indicators. A mere tap on the indicator stalk and the light will flash thrice (enough to change your lane on an expressway).

• Features dual-stage adaptive brake lights. If you brake harder than usual, and / or the ABS activates, the brake lights illuminate brighter than usual, and the light area becomes larger (to warn the vehicles behind).

• Buttons on the LHS of the steering wheel are useless (cruise control serves no purpose in India).

• You can toggle the multi-information-display via a button on the indicator stalk. Info thrown out is standard fare = outside temperature, average fuel efficiency, distance to empty and average speed.

• There’s premium velvet lining everywhere. The door pockets, driver storage bin (below headlamp controls), center glovebox, in-dash glovebox...

• Wide footwell for driver & front passenger. Great foot room.

• The sunroof cover is electric too (some other premium cars have manual sliding).

• Use the gearbox Manual Mode when driving spiritedly, especially on twisties and ghats. Ideally, you’d be using manual mode only between the 2nd to 6th gears. Anything lower or above that, AT is best. An in-dash display tells you what ratio you are using (M1, M2...). Though, for the masses out there, full automatic is the way to go. Let the electronics take care of the shifting.

• Expectedly, the climate control was a chiller. Without tints, and an outside temperature of 39 degrees, the air-con kept us cold.

• An ergonomic defect : With the steering & seat on their lowest positions, I couldn’t read the odometer / MID readings (had to crane my neck to do so). The steering was blocking my view.

• Of all the cars I’ve test-driven in the last 12 months, the Manza & Fortuner have impressed me most. The 5 series now joins that list. Its been 5 days since the test, and I still can't get it out of my head.

• Party trick : At 5 kph, floor the throttle. The rear will slide out and the traction control light blinks. Immediate torque delivery.

• The 525d is so good that the 530d is irrelevant for 99% of the crowd out there. We, of course, fall in the other 1%

• Bizarrely, when I was in the passenger seat without my seatbelts on (for the photoshoot), the seatbelt warning buzzer didn’t sound off at 40 kph. Is it activated only for the driver?

• Three mirrors combined are effective in telling you whats happening behind, albeit my personal preference is a size larger (ORVM). Both the ORVMs are convex. All three have automated anti-dazzle functionality.

• A 70 liter diesel tank results in a realistic 700 kms highway driving range.

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Old 31st May 2010, 15:27   #6
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The Smaller but Significant things:

Park distance control works like a charm. But car should have been displayed vertically, no?


Vehicle checks including oil level, tyre pressure, service intervals etc.


Owners manual fed into the iDrive. With pictorial explanations:




Read carefully. NO additives:


MID right below the meters. Warning that the key fob is out of range:


Deep storage bucket inside the boot. E60 had buckets on either side, the new 5 has it only on the RHS:


Air-vents below the front passenger seats (for rear benchers). Believe me, they churn out a serious amount of air:


Just the road for the new 5:


Totally unexpected. No height adjustable seatbelts!


Orange lighting looks sweet at night. At the bottom of the revv counter, you can see the "Efficient Dynamics" meter. It continually goes up & down, as the regenerative braking system kicks in:


Chunky door handles:


Glovebox with the 6 DVD changer tucked away:


Rear armrest is wide enough. No “elbowing” between rear passengers . Cup holders fold out:


To hook up the child seat. Two placed on the rear tray:


Nifty bag hook on the B pillar:


Small door pockets on the rear doors too. Nice to see an ashtray!

Last edited by GTO : 31st May 2010 at 16:21.
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:44   #7
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Excellent review GTO, The car looks definitely much better than the older 5 series. And those little details makes the car special.
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:51   #8
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Excellent review GTO

I like the styling of this F10 5-Series better than the previous one. Looks like BMW have a winner on their hands.
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Old 31st May 2010, 16:06   #9
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*****


What I was waiting for!

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Old 31st May 2010, 16:12   #10
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Excellent review! Very thorough.

I was put off by the tiny iDrive screen and the lack of temperature control options at the rear. The international launch video contains them (attached) - are they going to be options for any of the higher variants? I hope so for such an expensive car.

And why doesn't it have height adjustable seat belt points - even the Civic has them!
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Old 31st May 2010, 16:37   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rahulkool View Post
The car looks definitely much better than the older 5 series
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Originally Posted by Games Goblin View Post
I like the styling of this F10 5-Series better than the previous one
I totally agree. Unlike the quirky E60, the F10 is so clean and proportionate. Just as premium German cars have been through the 80s and the 90s. Its best to leave the "flavour of the day" designs to the Japs or Koreans. I fell in love with the 7 the first time I saw her, and that continues with the 5. The W140 Benz, E38 and E39 BMWs still look great today. I have my doubts on how an E60 will look 5 years down the line on our roads. The ol' Bangle 7 already seems like an eyesore.

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Originally Posted by sidindica View Post
What I was waiting for!
Nice pictures. Did you drive the 535i?

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I was put off by the tiny iDrive screen
The 530d and the 535i come with the larger 10" screen (7" in our test car).

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and the lack of temperature control options at the rear.
Not sure if the higher spec 5s have rear temperature control. Will check.
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Old 31st May 2010, 16:48   #12
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Fantastic review, GTO! Loved reading it - all the details that you analyze, great stuff! I saw a black F10 the other day and my oh my, it looked really awesome. Love the front and rear 3/4 view!

One question, when it comes down to it, would you buy one?

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Old 31st May 2010, 17:07   #13
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Those pics are from BMW studio, Delhi. No,I didn't drive, it was a display car.

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Originally Posted by anekho View Post
Fantastic review, GTO! Loved reading it - all the details that you analyze, great stuff! I saw a black F10 the other day and my oh my, it looked really awesome. Love the front and rear 3/4 view!

One question, when it comes down to it, would you buy one?
Someone should brainwash him to sell off his C220 and get the 530D.
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Old 31st May 2010, 17:22   #14
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Excellent thorough review GTO! The attention to detail is on par with the German here. I can see that you're upping the ante with each test. Keep it going.

The new 525d definitely looks great value for rupee for the sheer level of kit and technology it offers!

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Originally Posted by GTO View Post
I totally agree. Unlike the quirky E60, the F10 is so clean and proportionate.
I somehow prefer the design of the E60. The design was just brilliant in metal! To be fair to the F10, I haven't seen one in flesh yet. But have a feeling that it won't quite match the E60 on downright attitude.

Too bad Bangle is into furniture these days, though I am sure many over here would prefer it that way.

Coming back to the review, what is the digital dial(with the EfficientDynamics) at the bottom of the tachometer for?
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Old 31st May 2010, 17:31   #15
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I think that it is for brake energy regeneration. One odd observation: In GTO's car, the blue meter is on the right side whereas on my pic of 535i, it is on the left side..any differences perhaps?
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