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Old 5th March 2013, 08:36   #1
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Default ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium

As a community of car owners and drivers in India we've collectively had our fair share of experiences being scammed by con artists on the road. There is a barrage of scam threads all over the forum, and many of our members & readers would have had first-hand experiences of being duped inadvertently.

However, there is no single consolidated list of scams to warn you about what to watch out for, and how to avoid getting scammed yourself. This thread sorts through the variety of scams that motorists face, and tells you how to avoid them.

The list has been broken up into scams related to...
1. Buying a car (ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium)

2. Driving on the road (ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium)

3. Ownership, service & repair of your car (ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium)

4. Selling your car (ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium)
Use the links above to jump to the relevant section.

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:28.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:38   #2
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Scams related to buying a car

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Registering a car with the next model year on the RC.
The scam: Dealer charges a bribe of a certain amount, for example Rs.5000, in collusion with the RTO to register the vehicle you are buying, as the next year's model. Else, he registers the vehicle as being manufactured in the current year, and you lose out on discounts when buying, and resale value in the future.

How to avoid: Verify the VIN number (ARTICLE: Find your car's date of manufacture (VIN)) of the particular car you are buying, and insist that the model year mentioned on the RC be the same as the actual year of manufacture. This might sound like a disadvantage to some, but it's important to do what is right.

Related threads:


Dealer sells you a demo car / damaged car, for the full brand-new price.
The scam: Dealer resets the odometer and cleans up the car to make it look factory-fresh to the average buyer. Some demo cars even have their instrument clusters / odometers disconnected for the time they are in use, so no odo resetting is required. When buying a pre-owned car, you are more likely to be sold a clocked / accidental car. Don't believe the myth that digital odometers cannot be clocked - they can!

How to avoid: Do not make the full payment until you have inspected the car allotted to you and run through Team-BHP's PDI checklist (ARTICLE: Pre-delivery Inspection (PDI) & Check List).
Telltale signs of an odo roll-back include: flickering speedometer needle, scratches around the instrument cluster and dashboard screws, excessive wear on pedals and driver's seat. On the exterior, look for re-painted and less shiny body areas, including colour mismatches, uneven panel gaps, or a body-kit fitted. Marks of polishing material in nooks and crannies (both inside and outside) on a new car are suspicious too. Be prepared to refuse to take delivery of a car that you are not 100% satisfied with. In the case of a new car, ask for your money back. When searching for a used car, be prepared to spend a lot of time looking at dozens of cars . Ask a knowledgeable friend or trusted mechanic to accompany you. Just because the dealer is a big name, don't completely trust what they say.

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Dealer says he can get you a small discount if you provide your previous car's RC documents.
The scam: The dealer hides the fact that the company has launched an exchange bonus scheme for a large amount of money. He passes on only a small discount to you, and pockets the rest of the amount.

How to avoid: Shop at multiple dealers to get the best quotation for the particular model of car you want to buy. If the dealer asks for a copy of the RC of your previous car, that should alert you to make enquiries with other dealers, whether an exchange bonus scheme has been introduced by the manufacturer.

Related thread: Link (Detroit TATA : Exchange Bonus gimmick)


Dealer overcharges you for Road Tax / Insurance, also illegally collects "handling chages".
The scam: Dealer gives the customer a list of charges that are payable over and above the ex-showroom price of the vehicle, hoping that in the excitement of buying a new car, the customer fails to scrutinize the specific items mentioned therein.

How to avoid: Scrutinize each of the charges levied by the dealer. Road tax amount can be verified from your local RTO enquiry counter or on their website.
Check that the insurance amount they quote is comparable to an online quote from sites like policybazaar.com. If not, you are within your rights to insure your car from any insurer yourself. Dealers are known to insist that they will not sell you a car unless you buy insurance from them. Write to the manufacturer about such behaviour, and change your dealer if required.
No dealer can collect handling charges, as directed by the Supreme Court.

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Someone advertises (usually online) to sell an almost-new immaculate car for a throwaway price.
The scam: You will be asked to deposit a part of the cost of the car as initial 'shipping' and 'handling' charges, after which you will see no more of your money or the seller. Quite often these scams involve the seller being "out of the country".

How to avoid: If the price sounds too good to be true, it definitely is. Stay away from buying cars when you cannot physically meet the seller and check the vehicle & documentation in person.

Related thread: Link (SCAM: Brand New Toyota Car for 2.8 Lakhs)


Bogus insurance papers provided, or reduced coverage.
The scam: You are issued a cover note for insuring your car, but when you want to claim insurance, you find that the insurance policy issued to you is bogus. Sometimes, the insurance agent might try to save you some premium, and without your say-so, remove essential cover for flood / riots / natural calamities.

How to avoid:
• Use the services of an insurance agent who is highly recommended, or someone you have known for long.
• Read the fine print in your policy. Make sure that there are no glaring omissions in the cover that you have bought for your car.
• Remember to re-check the policy at the time of renewal too.
• In case of a dispute between you and the insurer over settlement of a claim or any other issue, seek help from the IRDA.

Related thread: Link (*SCAM* Cover Note Issued, No Insurance Policy Yet!!)

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:09.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:39   #3
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Scams related to driving on the road

ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium-02-road-20130207_1023.jpg

Now that you have got yourself a genuinely good car, and paid exactly the right amount for what you bought, it's time to drive it on the road. Here, again, are thousands of con artists trying very hard to relieve you of your hard earned money.

You are cheated in (quantity or quality) when buying fuel.
The scam:
• The pump attendant starts to fill your tank without resetting the digital counter to "0.00". This means you get less fuel than you paid for. Sometimes one attendant distracts you just as the other one starts filling up.
• Your fuel can be adulterated to varying extents.
• The crooked pump attendant has a deal with your driver, wherein they fill less than you pay for and then they split their 'profit'.
• The fuel delivery system may be doctored in various manners to deliver less fuel than what the meter shows.
• Your credit card can be swiped twice for the same amount. Can be a genuine mistake, but you would end up with money lost if you are not alert.

How to avoid: Most importantly, find a trusted fuel pump. Always remember to keep your eye on the digital counter from the beginning of a fill-up, right through till the end. Enable instant SMS alerts for credit and debit card purchases. Ask a friend or even a taxi driver (they stick to trusted pumps because of the large quantity of fuel they use) to recommend a pump. Search for Team-BHP's list of trusted fuel pumps by city, linked below for your convenience.

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Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:09.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:41   #4
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Lone drivers, especially women, are easier targets for false accusations, physical intimidation and theft.
The scam:
• You can be blamed for running over someone (typically in slow-moving traffic).
• You can be blamed for having caused an accident to another vehicle earlier on during your commute.
• Someone can open the doors of your car at a traffic light, to get in or steal your purse / mobile.
• One person distracts you at a signal, whilst the other reaches in and grabs your valuables.
• You'll be told to stop, under the false pretense of a flat tyre / sparks coming from the bonnet, and then be ripped off by their friend who is a "mechanic".
• You'll be sold something at a steal of a price at a signal. When you check the product, it will be a dud or a dead-weight in its place.

How to avoid:
• Always keep your doors locked and windows wound up.
• A frightened target is an easier target, so remain calm and do not show fear.
• Always be prepared for a premeditated escape route, even it means your own car suffers minor damage.
• Don't leave valuables (purse / phone / laptop / money) in plain sight.
• Avoid giving lifts to strangers, even if they are women or children.
• Think twice when people try to attract your attention or knock on your glass to talk to you. Avoid eye contact.
• Use your car's horn if in a desolate location and it's possible to get attention from passersby.
• Make it clear to the con-artists that you are calling the cops right away.
• Keep a can of pepper spray within easy reach in the car. Don't use it unless self-defense is necessary.
• Do not get out of the car in any place other than your destination. If you really have a flat tyre, the car will feel heavier than usual. If your car is on fire, you'll see smoke. Insurance will pay. Relax.

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Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:22.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:43   #5
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Theft of fuel from your vehicle at a parking lot, or at the service workshop.
The scam: When you leave your key with a parking attendant regularly, he knows that you would not make a sudden appearance out of schedule. This gives him the confidence to steal fuel from your car. A tempting proposition with todays fuel prices. Some cars even allow them to siphon off fuel via the filler cap.

How to avoid:
• Avoid leaving the keys of your car with the parking attendant.
• Install a fuel lock on your bike. Make sure that your fuel filler cap is locked securely.
• Park the vehicle in a publicly visible area if possible.
• Do not leave the car with a full tank if you suspect theft is taking place regularly from your car.
• Make it clear to the suspected people that you are noting the position of the fuel gauge before handing over the car.
• Always send your car to the workshop with as little fuel in the tank as possible.
• Keep a regular log of your average fuel consumption per tank-full. It will allow you to spot a drastic change.

Related threads:

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:21.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:44   #6
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Puncturing your tyres, to make money by repairing them.
The scam: The attendant filling air in your tyres surreptitiously punctures one with a pin or some other sharp tool, and then informs you that you have a puncture. Alternatively, road-side puncture shops may spread sharp objects / nails on the road just a short distance before their shop. This increases the chances of you stopping by (un)expectedly.

How to avoid: Get out of the car and supervise the attendant who is filling air. This also ensures it's done correctly and that the valve-caps are put back on securely. Filling air yourself with a good air pump, whether manual or electric, is an excellent option too. If you are in a situation where your gut dissuades you from using the puncture shop's repair service, despite being in need of it, put on your spare tyre and drive off.

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Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:23.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:46   #7
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Luggage theft from your car's boot under the guise of a security check.
The scam: You are asked to open your car's boot on the pretext of the person wanting to check the contents for security reasons. He might even be in some sort of uniform. You are a more vulnerable target if you are in a sedan, carry an out-of-state registration, or appear to be travelling long-distance with several bags (higher chance of carrying valuable stuff). Typically this takes place in long lines near check-points or toll-plazas. In some cases you could also be requested to stop under the guise of an Octroi check.

How to avoid: Do not unlock the boot in the middle of the road just because someone asks you to. Even at a security barrier, first make sure that the people asking you to open the boot are genuine police or security personnel (always ask for their ID, take it in hand and examine it closely). Try to get out of the car and verify that nothing is being removed. If you have a reversing camera installed, turn it on (place the car in reverse gear) and watch if any luggage is being removed by the person checking inside.

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Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:23.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:48   #8
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Toll plaza personnel charge you more, or even less than the published toll fee.
The scam: Some toll plazas on highways remove the board specifying the correct toll to pay, and charge you more. Others charge you less, but refuse to issue a toll receipt. Some will take the correct amount for the round-trip or maximum distance, but only issue you a receipt for the single-trip or earlier exit. In the process, the operator always pockets the extra money for themselves.

How to avoid: Always insist on getting a printed receipt for the toll you paid, verify that the amount is correct and ensure the car number matches (if applicable).

Related thread: Link (Scam/ Corruption in Toll Plaza)

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:23.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:49   #9
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Default Scams related to driving on the road...

Crooked policemen try to reprimand you for breaking the law, when you're innocent.
The scam: There are innumerable reports about how some bad examples of these men in uniform try to make a quick buck by threatening and harassing innocent motorists by virtue of the legal powers bestowed on them. Their modus operandi is to look for vulnerable targets who appear to be unaware of the laws of the land. Then, they accuse you of breaking some rule (such as lane-cutting, not wearing a seat belt, talking on the mobile and even smoking), threaten to take away your license, arrest you and impound your car, until you are frightened or inconvenienced enough to pay up even though you have not done anything wrong or illegal.

How to avoid:
• Be aware of the law of the land. Read the Motor Vehicles Act (Lets know the law (Motor Vehicles Act)).
• Use a car video recorder (DVR) to undeniably prove your innocence.
• Do not hesitate to call a lawyer friend to seek clarification on laws.
• Ask the policeman to prove his identity, if you think he is falsely accusing you of breaking any rule. Make a note of the same.
• Call '100' if you think the policeman is a fake.
• If served a challan by post for a traffic offense that you may not have committed, consider the number to have been noted by human error, and check if the make, model and colour of the car described on the challan matches yours. If they do not match, your fine is cancelled.

Related threads:

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:24.
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Old 5th March 2013, 08:51   #10
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Scams related to ownership, service & repair

ARTICLE: Common SCAMS Encountered on Indian Roads - A Compendium-03-during-service-13122011_003.jpg

It is not just strangers on the road who try to make a quick buck by scamming you. You tend to whole-heartedly trust those who take care of your pride and joy - and the same 'trustworthy' people insuring and servicing your vehicle are just as guilty of knowingly trying to defraud you.

Pay for a complete oil change, but you don't get what you paid for.
The scam:
• Method 1 : You get spurious or used oil poured into your engine.
• Method 2 : You are billed for a complete oil change, but they only do a top-up, and perhaps don't even replace the oil filter. The same could apply for other filters and worn out parts that need to be replaced but aren't.
• Method 3 : You are asked to pay for engine flushing and "oil treatment" at every oil change.

How to avoid:
• For Method 1 : Typically, spurious oils are sold from outlets in smaller cities, and ASCs source their oil supply directly from lube oil manufacturers' distributors. If you are sourcing your own oil, make absolutely sure that it is from a genuine vendor.
• For Method 2 : Check the colour of the engine oil as soon as the car is delivered to you after service. If it is discoloured and does not appear fresh and clear, you know that a partial change or no change has been done. Mark your existing oil filter in a way that will allow you to verify whether it has been changed or not (eg. sign on it with an indelible pen or score the surface with a pin). Same for the other filters and replaceable parts. If you have the time, nothing beats standing beside your car and keeping a keen eye on it during the service.
• For Method 3 : No manufacturer recommends engine flush or oil treatment as a regular routine - check your owner's manual. When handing in the car for service, insist that engine flush and oil treatment are NOT carried out for your car. Refuse to pay for it, if the ASC still includes it on the bill.

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Old 5th March 2013, 08:52   #11
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Default Scams related to ownership, service & repair...

You are advised to unnecessarily replace your clutch during a service.
The scam: Service advisors at ASCs advise that your clutch needs an overhaul. It could be because you have some minor complaint such as a hard clutch pedal (where the actual problem may lie with the clutch cable or hydraulic system), or it is suggested as a standard procedure. Clutch overhauling is a very profitable business for service centres, because the labour charges for doing the work are so high, and there is usually no warranty for worn clutches.

How to avoid: Know how to identify whether your clutch is worn out and needs a replacement or not. For details on what you need to look out for, read the related thread below.

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Old 5th March 2013, 08:54   #12
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Default Scams related to ownership, service & repair...

You are advised to service your car more frequently than is recommended by the manufacturer.
The scam: The dealer's call centre ask you to bring your car in for service. A lot of cars have a 10,000-km/15,000-km service interval, but the dealer would say that a new circular from the company has changed that to a 5,000-km service interval.

How to avoid: Stick to the service intervals recommended in your car's owner's manual. If in doubt as to whether the manufacturer has changed service schedules and intervals, do not hesitate to call/email their customer service centre and inquire. Call and ask another dealer as well, just to be sure.

Related thread: Link (Dealer SCAM : Service the car *more frequently* than required!)

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Old 5th March 2013, 08:56   #13
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Default Scams related to ownership, service & repair...

Service centre replaces good parts of your car with bad ones, or uses your car for joyrides.
The scam: This is one of the most under-reported scams, since it is hard to detect or prove. The mechanic could swap out a failed component from his friend's car with a working one from your car, and in the process collect some money from his friend too. In a variation of this, the mechanic could put a spurious (non-OE) spare in your car and sell the OEM spare in the market for a higher price. You are especially vulnerable if your car is just out of warranty, or going to be out of warranty by the time the next scheduled service comes up. Other daring mechanics might even take your car out for a midnight joy-ride.

How to avoid: Be very watchful of your car when it is being serviced. Refuse to leave the car overnight with the ASC if possible. Once out of warranty, find a good FNG and get the majority of your service requirements attended to by him. Some cars, whose costs of spares are very high, are more common targets for such scams than others, as also certain types of spares - the suspension components, for example, or the turbocharger, brake and clutch master cylinders with initial signs of failure, faulty brake boosters that sometimes work and sometimes don't, etc. Such a failed part does not attract immediate attention because the car continues to run, and most customers psychologically have a "feeling good" mindset when they receive their cars fresh from service. To prevent the joyrides, take note of the odometer reading, or install a stealthy GPS logger / tracker in your car.

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Default Scams related to ownership, service & repair...

Warranty exclusions on plea of 'wear and tear' parts.
The scam: Warranty claims for brake components, clutches and suspension components are not honoured. These are also not covered under extended warranty. You are also billed for 'consumables' such as rubber parts, oils and lubricants, even though these are essential steps of replacing a component under warranty.

How to avoid: Read the fine print in your warranty document. It's all there in black and white. Not much you can do except smile and pay up. Taking a strong stand and writing to the manufacturer about premature component failure can sometimes get you a refund. Being friendly with the service centre personnel sometimes helps you to settle a claim under warranty too.

Related thread: Link (The great Indian Warranty scam - How "grey areas" mean you get robbed)

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Old 5th March 2013, 08:59   #15
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Scams related to selling your car

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The new owner does not transfer the vehicle's registration to his name.
The scam: You fill up the relevant forms (29 & 30) and hand them over to the new owner, expecting him to transfer the car to his name. After a few months, you get a traffic challan in your name, which you are legally bound to pay. Even worse, you could have the cops turn up at your doorstep, inquiring about a hit-and-run accident your car was involved in. The new owner not only benefits by not being the person responsible for breaking laws while using the car, he also gains when selling the car, because the car remains a first-owner car on paper.

How to avoid: Transfer the ownership of the car to the new owner's name yourself. View Team-BHP's guide on selling your used car for additional tips.

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Buyer uses a forged mode of payment (eg. fake demand draft).
The scam: The buyer hands you the final payment in the form of a demand draft or bankers cheque, in exchange for the vehicle on the spot. These payment methods are usually trusted to be 'as good as cash', but in this case are forged and worthless. In another variation found online, the prospective buyer who is not in the same city as you will offer to wire you the money. They will then send you a spoofed email that appears to be from your online account (eg. paypal or netbanking) saying that a certain sum of money has been deposited, when in fact it hasn't. One of the buyer's accomplices will come to pick up the vehicle, never to be seen again.

How to avoid: Before handing over the keys to the vehicle, ensure that the whole payment has been cleared and the bank confirms the deposit into your account. This advice applies to every single mode of payment. Be extra cautious when the buyer seems to be in a hurry, or hasn't met you face to face. For online payments, always go directly to the secured site and check that the deposit has been received. Never trust emails, and never use the links within emails when you want to visit the secure site.

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Image Credits : The pictures of this Article have been sourced from various Team-BHP threads. Thanks to BHPians for shooting & sharing them.

Last edited by Rehaan : 5th March 2013 at 13:02.
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